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Advertising with Brand Characters

Some brand characters include Dos Equis’ "the most interesting man in the world", Jolly Green Giant, and The Michelin Man. These characters are meant to establish long term recognition and should be effective in having a cultural impact. What’s the story behind certain brand characters like the Marlboro Man, Pillsbury Doughboy, or Tony the Tiger? How do they embody the brand’s identity and appeal to their target market/consumers? How have they evolved over the years?

  • Let's not forget the Progressive Insurance lady, Flo! She's the best! – Christen Mandracchia 1 year ago
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  • I think it would be more interesting to steer away from simply telling the stories of certain brand mascots, towards talking about the development of these mascots over the years, i.e. who they are appealing to, what sort of marketing concepts are they appealing to. While it will be necessary to discuss the stories behind some of them, there should be some discussion about the development over time, and trying to deduce the path into the future of characters in advertising. – Matthew Sims 12 months ago
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  • I think it will be more beneficial to narrow down the topic to some specific areas of discussion. A common denominator or target theme might help to have a solid discussion. For example focusing on a few different cosmetic companies as a focal point to see how each use characters to create a familiar brand, who their target consumers were and how have they evolved over the years. – Arazoo Ferozan 11 months ago
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  • Two of the commentators before me have focused on the idea of how one of the characters has changed over the years. Two related cases I remember reading something about are Aunt Jemima (with her changing appearances) and the Marlboro Man (introduced to give that cigarette brand an entirely new, masculine association).Rather than track a character over time, it would also be possible to develop a close reading of the character's appearance and performance at any one given moment. – JamesBKelley 2 months ago
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8

David Bowie as Creative Inspiration

How was Bowie’s own creativity through music and other mediums has also caused others to be influenced in their own work.

  • I recommend for researching this to look at recent comments made after this death. Many people have talked about how he was an inspiration. If the writer can find some of these examples he or she can look to that artist's work to find examples. One example I can think of off the top of my head was Broadway director Robert Jess Roth who directed the original production of Beauty and the Beast says that his biggest influence is rock gods like Bowie. This was reflected in the way he designed the Beast as more of a rock star than an animal. One example, but this is the KIND of research and evidence I suggest the writer uses. – Christen Mandracchia 1 year ago
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  • I think it would be useful to mention his androgynout style inspiring lgbt rights and freedom. Also, he blew off his Hall of Fame induction. Perhaps look at that as a form of inspiration to not care about the hype? Then of course his creative and versatile music and his music videos! Find examples if how his musical style changed over time and the artists that credit him as an influence or at least adopted some of his style in their own art. – Robyn McComb 12 months ago
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  • Lady GaGa has always said that David Bowie was a major influence for her music (to the point where she copied or used direct lines from his work). I myself have written a few pieces that were inspired by him. Even the 11th Doctor, Peter Capaldi, said that he based his Doctor Who wardrobe on David Bowie. – JennyCardinal 8 months ago
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  • Dylan fan, mentioned by George Clinton, sampled by James Brown, and declined knighthood; truly one of the greats. – Tigey 7 months ago
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Locked

Freedom of Speech through Creative Mediums

What are the most relevant examples of free speech that has been expressed through creative mediums. Have they perfectly expressed their point or even crossed the line?

  • Could you be more specific in what you mean by relevant examples? Relevant to what? – LaRose 1 year ago
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  • This sounds like it would be a timely topic. I would be interested in pursuing it especially with a view to looking at how comedians have brought about social change and have used political satire to respond to various views expressed by presidential candidates. Donald Trump has certainly challenged and some would say crossed the line in some of his comments. Is this what you had in mind?Also news reporting has become very politically correct in Canada. I regularly watch CNN and am impressed with the well-researched questions asked by various hosts. I have heard Alex Wagner a few time as well as others. In Canada we don't have anyone asking the touch questions and as a result the information conveyed is done in a very shallow and superficial way. At least in America, the topics relating race form a national dialogue.If you could clarify what take you wanted on this topic such as sticking with politics, comedy shows or news reporting, I would be interested in nabbing this topics.Thanks! – Munjeera 1 year ago
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  • I think this is an interesting topic, but definitely needs to be narrowed to a more specific instance, as above, otherwise, it could just descend into soapboxing about when free speech is justified. So, this could focus on free speech in comedy (e.g. Louis C.K's Saturday Night Live appearance). I think whoever writes this up needs to qualify what is meant by creative mediums, especially when discussing something like politics, something which is usually confined to the news side of media. – Matthew Sims 12 months ago
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  • Very interesting, you could add YouTube for this as well, since it is a creative medium to an extent and you get videos of just about anything. As long as it doesn't violate copyright, it stays up. – SpectreWriter 12 months ago
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Taken by aeolsen17 (PM) 1 month ago.
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Trend of Plastic Surgery

Plastic surgery is a trend for men and women. However, nowadays people seem to praise those who do not do plastic surgery. For example, in South Korea many women do at the least botox or double eyelid surgery. But nowadays people have praised actresses like Park Sodam who does not have the "typical" pretty girl look, however, is praised for being beautiful with her natural look. People are emphasizing the fact that she shouldn’t do plastic surgery to survive the entertainment industry. Another example is singer Lee Hyori who was in a famous girl group during the 90s, however, people praise her because she doesn’t do any plastic surgery as she gets older. Many other celebrities her age are starting to look plastic surgery monsters, their faces are unrecognizable.

  • This is intriguing. I'm curious how this topic will extend into art forms. Someone approaching this could potentially analyze if and how the topic of plastic surgery is approached in art and use the real life occurrences expressed here as a jumping-off point. – emilydeibler 1 year ago
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  • There is potential here to talk about the affect of photography as an art form, and the way that editing the human body as part of a piece of art has affected body image? Although that seems to be an entirely different topic. It seems that you're getting at plastic surgery in the context of celebrities and entertainment. – MichelleAjodah 1 year ago
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  • This could be under the literature section if someone wanted to cover the trilogy by Scott Westerfeld of The Uglies, The Pretties and The Specials. – Munjeera 12 months ago
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  • I agree that this topic could benefit from a different angle so that it's relevant to the arts or literature. I would suggest watching out for judgmental language though, (ie. "plastic surgery monsters"). – Tiffany 11 months ago
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2

How Trumpism could Affect the Visual Arts

The recent election of Donald Trump as president elect of the United States has created anxiety in the hearts and minds of much of the populace, especially with regard to a possible repealing of rights for minorities, women, the LGBT population, immigrants, and to the environment itself. Given the prospect of a seemingly more marginalized media, how could such atmosphere affect the visual arts?

  • Much compelling art is made in protest to things exactly like this. Would this be an angle for this article? Or would it be more centered on the acceptance of the creative life within society? – Mariel Tishma 2 months ago
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  • Personally, I've read Literary Hub articles where the arts as a whole actually flourished under Regan (e.g. SST records, the "Our Band Could Be Your Life" book, indie rock in general, among the other mediums). I hope this era of Trump will incentivize another golden age of progressive art. – Kyle 2 months ago
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  • yes this definitely seems like a possibility. It is necessary to stay vigilant and make sure that the freedom of expression that is so cherished in the visual arts is not impeded. We don't need another Jesse Helms de-funding federal resources to the arts. – jonj724 2 months ago
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What do you think will happen to the entertainement industry in the US?

Anyone who has been following the US elections knows about Donald Trump’s moral values, though many would argue that his morals are more than questionable. With such a person taking charge, how will Trump’s radical ideals effect the entertainment industry which uses its productions to highlight ethical values.

  • Undoubtedly cultural life is strongly influenced by changes in political systems and social structures. However I don't think that Trump will have the power to 'overtake' the artistic field in the US. First of all because, according to me, this is a man with no vision for the future, he is narrow-minded and not suitable to be the head of such a leading power country. Second, I think that the indusrty is not that easily manipulated, on the contrary, topics such as immigration, feminism and so on may become the focal point of their investigation. – Kaya 2 months ago
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  • To quote a professor of mine: "The best tragedies have always been written in times of political turmoil. If nothing else, a Trump presidency will mean four years of great theatre." Food for thought. – ProtoCanon 2 months ago
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  • I feel like a large, LARGE part of the answer to this can come from Goebbels and Riefenstahl's films during the Nazi era. The difference would only be in terms of the restrictions imposed. Also, I'm looking to see a rapid undoing of the progress made in terms of female centric / minority centric cinema coming from Hollywood, rapid increase in cultural stereotyping of actors (you could take a look at this YouTube video song for more on this : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSwhRZwFjfY ), and lots of violence and racist/sexist humour in terms of both television, music and cinema. I would like to hope literature will be less affected, but who knows? – JayBird 2 months ago
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  • It all depends on how people react to Trump's win. Those who are morally corrupt will continue to create garbage, and people who are morally correct will excel and create mind-blowing entertainment. Trump is not an immoral person. He said immoral things to get the attention of immoral people. – mjrogus 2 months ago
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  • I tend to agree with mjgorus. Trump's inflammatory campaign, while based on unfettered candor considered to be offensive to certain groups(woman, people of color, immigrants, etc.), spoke to another group of people who were uncertain of how to participate in the ever-growing culture wars consuming our country. I did support Clinton, but I found Trump's rhetoric to connect with a lot of white middle class people who were afraid to address racism and sexism due to the threat of being labeled a bigot, sexist, or racist. Not that I'm advocating all of his grumpy ramblings, but I do think these are in fact very interesting times for our country. It would be nice to see a return to The Golden Age of Hollywood while also incorporating our cultural diversity. But more importantly, it would be great to see NEW movies, and not dull remakes strung together with unintelligible modern twists. – DrownSoda 2 months ago
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Published

Tattoos as Art

From traditional Folklife tattooing to the evolving methods and styles of tattooing (watercolor, biomechanical, pixels, dot work), tattoos are the unsung contributions to the world of art.

In 2013, Buzzfeed compiled a listicle of 13 brilliant tattooists who are contributing to the new artistic stylings: https://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/coolest-tattoo-artists-in-the-world?utm_term=.en0B44Abn#.dhRw44d30

The Smithsonian Center of Folklife and Cultural Heritage held a 2012 exhibit on tattoos, and the New York Times profiled a 2013 Highbrow Ink exhibit regarding the artistry of tattoos.

In what ways do tattoos conform to artistic norms and practices, and in what ways are they still regarded as culturally inferior expressions of art? Examine the bias (and growing acceptance) to tattoo culture, and draw parallels to how similar bias existed regarding modern art, living art, and various other forms artistic expression throughout history.

  • As someone with numerous tattoos--many of which, if not all, are inspired by literary and poetic works--I love this topic! There is always a debate regarding whether or not tattoo artists can truly be considered artists. This is asinine, especially due to the amount of time and skill implemented in the sketches for tattoos. Great inclusion of the exhibit featured at the Smithsonian! I know a few people who went and said it was amazing. I do hope this topic gets picked up...great conversation piece! – danielle577 6 months ago
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  • There's currently an exhibit on until September at the ROM in Toronto called "Tattoos. Ritual. Identity. Obsession. Art.", which explores the history of tattoos (and highlights how so many traditions were destroyed by colonialism...). It was fascinating, and I would highly recommend checking it out for sources. – tmorand 6 months ago
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  • Interesting art form that combines the traditional and the avant-garde! – jcsart 2 months ago
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The progressive side of offensive stand up

An analysis of how stand-up comedy bits deemed "offensive" by many can have positive and progressive effects on society. This could include humor as a method for minorities to gain acceptance, easing tensions between conflicting groups, and necessary questioning of social norms. Distinctions should also be made over helpful, value neutral, or harmful humor. For example, George Carlin’s 7 words bit or any number of Dave Chappelle’s bits on race as opposed to Michael Richard’s racist rant at the Laugh Factory or numerous bits done by Bernard Manning.

  • Russell Peters is another example of this type of humor but he has always stated that he is challenging stereotypes. – Munjeera 8 months ago
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