Jonathan Judd

Jonathan Judd

Six years into the academic system and I'm firmly held to a vow of poverty as a dedicated student and intellectual. Areas of study and devotion are Art and Cultural History.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    celebrity appeal: how celebrity endorsement galvanizes the cause

    Choose a celebrity or multiple celebrities and discuss the phenomenon of celebrity appeal in America. Do celebrities have an obligation to use their popularity and appeal to speak out against things like global warming and war? Also, their great and often rapid accumulation of wealth, should this obligate them to support social justice causes, and in what ways? Some clear examples to discuss are Dicaprio and Pitt or even Mortensen and Michael Moore. Recent developments revolving around the presidential inauguration and celebrity refusals to participate, could provide good points for discussion.
    One more point for discussion would be to evaluate the effect that certain celebrities have had on the social or political causes they’ve endorsed, in our contemporary moment or in the past.

    • This is an interesting topic. I think it might also be interesting to examine the effects of public social/political advocacy on celebrity popularity. At the risk of sounding cynical, it seems to me that a celebrity publicly stating opinions about political/social issues can work either for or against him/her - depending largely, of course, on whether or not people LIKE the opinions he/she is stating. This is admittedly just a casual observation on my part, but from what I gather, when people LIKE the message, they tend to cheer the celebrity on and praise him/her for sharing the message - but when they DON'T like the message, they tend to trash the celebrity, call for boycotts of his/her work, and/or declare that celebrities in general should "just shut up" about politics. The various reactions to Meryl Streep's Golden Globes speech are a good new example. – OBri 1 month ago
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    • Celebs are damned if they do or if they don't. If they speak out about social justice causes, they're labeled as phonies or ppl say that they're only speaking out because it's the 'trend' to do so. However, if they don't speak out they're criticized for not using their public roles properly. – seouljustice 1 month ago
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    • I think another important point to discuss in this is how much the celebrities actually do for the organizations they promote versus just talking about them. This goes a long with the affect they have had on those issues. I think drawing a clear line between the movements/organizations growing because of the groups own efforts and what the celebrities have actually contributed. – JenniferRobinMc 4 weeks ago
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    Taken by LC Morisset (PM) 2 weeks ago.
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    Political Satire and Presidential Decorum: How to Take a Joke

    Discuss the ways in which past elected officials in the U.S. have found themselves the center of one comedic play or another. How have these individuals, from presidents to senators, reacted to the satirical jabs directed at them? Is it possible to maintain the decorum of an elected official in face of a grinning Voltaire? Be specific and really focus in on one or a select core of presidential and or political figures that really fit the bill. Focus on a genre or style of humor like satire and really explore the mechanics of this humor as used for substantive critique. Great potential here, enjoy the adventure.

    • just an awesome topic considering the political season is coming to an end. Use things such as late night comedy to analysis deeper. Saturday Night Live does an awesome display of political satire and persuasion. It also holds a bias that makes it even more interesting. – Brittanie 3 months ago
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    • Don't leave out Amos and Andy. A political satire about the trial of Rodney King. – Munjeera 2 months ago
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    Netflix Originals: an Emergent Space for the Counterculture

    Analyze the depth and breadth of shows ranging from various genres that Netflix as a platform has facilitated. On the whole, the cultural products emerging from this Netflix Originals platform are daring and experimental with a progressive bent. Discuss this choosing a particular set of shows or genre. For me it is striking how many fantastic documentaries they are facilitating. Documentaries that otherwise wouldn’t be produced or would be extremely obscure. The recent documentary on the 13th amendment is amazing, also the recent one covering the minimalist movement shows interesting aspects of countercultural realities.

    • You could also explore where this counterculture comes from and why. Many of the shows are British, but are they more inclusive, less? Is it based on creators? Age? Or even sex? This could all be explored in a study of the counterculture. – TheSwampThing 2 months ago
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    • It would also be interesting to look at the politics of such shows in connection to ist audience. Who watches which Netflix prodcut? Who is reached by Netflix/ Who can enjoy ist content? – Laura Jungblut 2 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Jonathan Judd

    It would be nice to see the character representing Lust to be either androgynous or male. Easily signifying sexual promiscuity through the objectification of the ‘evil woman’ trope is sexist and outdated. The entire deadly sins thematic is a bit problematic for me and shot through with overt Christian moralizing, abstracting elements of the human condition far more complex than a singular moniker can explain.

    Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
    Jonathan Judd

    Well stated Kevin, this is Tarantino’s point and I certainly support it!

    Tarantino Speaks Out: Police Brutality vs. Cinematic Violence
    Jonathan Judd

    your use of the ‘game-play’ theorem to sift through the various temporal shifts in the plot and interpret their potential meaning is really dynamite. I enjoyed the shift in perspective, learning more about movies I already relegated to my mental archives.

    Reservoir Dogs: The Game and Deception
    Jonathan Judd

    Its true, and here in America we seem to have a deep routed and historical love affair with the criminal and vigilante. This goes back to the 1920’s with the citizenry’s infatuation with gangsters and gun-runners like Al Capone.

    Tarantino Speaks Out: Police Brutality vs. Cinematic Violence
    Jonathan Judd

    Definitely, the line between reality and digital hallucination is constantly blurring, there’s a lot of great scholarship on this topic. Some of my favorite post-modern theorists are at pains to explain how our very conception of reality and surreality is hopelessly arbitrary and distorted.

    Tarantino Speaks Out: Police Brutality vs. Cinematic Violence
    Jonathan Judd

    Hooray, it is always my most sincere hope to simply convert someone to powers of Tarantino and his filmography!

    Tarantino Speaks Out: Police Brutality vs. Cinematic Violence
    Jonathan Judd

    This topic is so interesting and cannot be analyzed or discussed enough, some really great work here. I would also look to other female characters in positions of power and the way in which their position involves a masquerade of both feminine and masculine characteristics. This is most salient in hollywood during the 40s and 50s, especially in the psychological thrillers of Hitchcock. I’m thinking specifically of “Spellbound,” great film.

    His Girl Friday and the Agency of Women Journalists in Hollywood
    Jonathan Judd

    Some good critical insight here, the history that you lay out with regard to the Croatoan marking and the racial imbrication of the early settlers and indigenous tribe is great. However, it is important to note that while AHS is certainly problematic it has a deep allegorical complexity to its plotlines, characters and settings that must be kept in mind. In the Coven season there are definite parallels to be drawn between the really existing racial animus of New Orleans and the constructed divide between the witches and the voodoo practitioners. There is also room in any examination of AHS to discuss the element of revisionist history that permeates throughout, where socio-cultural time and space is distorted and reconfigured to often flip historical power-structures.

    A Hidden Racism in American Horror Story: Roanoke