mattdoylemedia

mattdoylemedia

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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Latest Topics

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3D Films: The future of cinema, or a long-standing novelty act?

3D films have been dropping and out of vogue since the 1950’s and have, in actuality, been experimented with prior to even then. But are 3D films really a viable mainstream form of film making, or are they simple a novelty act that evolves with each new era of moviegoers? This article takes us through the history of the art form and discusses how successful 3D films and 3D elements actually are in comparison to their 2D bretheren.

  • Honestly, unless the human eye is able to evolve to a point where it can withstand fake immersive 3D, I don't think 3D has a real future as the next step in theater evolution. VR will expand greatly in the next decade or so, allowing any number of mediums and applications to make use of it. But it will only be able to be enjoyed for reasonable lengths of time by those who do not contract headaches and bloodshot eyes from using either polarized glasses, or double-screen headsets. – Jonathan Leiter 1 year ago
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  • You could talk about how some films use 3D as a gimmick, and how other films like Avatar uses 3D to enhance the experience. I also think it would be worth while to talk about how long the 3D craze can last. For animated kids movies for example, parents don't want to pay extra money for 3D. 3D TV's where predicted to be the new big thing, but almost nobody bought them. It would be interesting to analyses the longevity of 3D in films – Aaron Hatch 1 year ago
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  • Both good points.On the standpoint of it being a gimmick, I do wonder personally if using it sparingly (such as 'Freddie vision in Nightmare on Elm Street 6' works better as it doesn't overdo the effect.The headaches are also a good point because they're what prevent me from seeing modern 3D films. – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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  • I feel The Hobbit films would be worth mentioning and how the 48fps enhanced the 3D. Explore how other advancements affect 3D in films. – 44jeanette44 1 year ago
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  • I agree, I think The Hobbit films would be a unique point of comparison. Great topic, would be interested to see where someone takes this. – emilyinmannyc 1 year ago
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  • 3D will most likely always be a thing, and covering the history will probably show that, but if critic and movie-goers opinions are gauged, it seems to be that we are entering a time when no one really wants 3D at the cinema. – Austin Bender 1 year ago
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  • I have heard that 3D movies do very well internationally, even though here in the states they are commonly seen as a way to flush 2 more bucks down the toilet. It is not as much of an "event." I wonder why that is. – Candice Evenson 1 year ago
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  • In my opinion the situation is somewhat similar to when we switched from black-and-white to color - the technology was available since the beginning of the 20th century but it didn't really pick until the 50s and 60s. It was magnificently advertised purely for the spectacle, people thought it was awesome blah blah blah - and eventually things calmed down and color simply became another tool in the filmmaker's toolbox - no longer a novelty just to "flush 2 more bucks down the toilet" as Candice Evenson puts it.... – jmato 1 year ago
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Latest Tides

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anime

A Crunchyroll of the Dice: Love Live! vs. Sword Art Online

There are countless anime series out there, and it can sometimes be hard to decide which ones to try and which ones not to. On top of that, there are always going to be anime that you know are supposed to be good, but that you just aren’t sure whether or not to give time to. This week, I embraced both two series that fit into that category for me, and did so completely by accident.

In order to make use of my Crunchyroll membership, I decided that it was time to try some new shows. To do this, I set myself some simple rules: I would pick two shows completely at random, if the series picked have more than one season then I start with season, and I make a real effort to watch the first episode of both, regardless of what series I get. The aim was to them post my thoughts on both shows, then set them in a face-to-face battle over multiple categories to decide which one I preferred.

In my first foray into taking a ‘Crunchyroll of the dice’, the two random series turned out to be ones that I knew of, but had intentionally avoided for various reasons: Love Live! School Idol Project and Sword Art Online. Did either win me over? Which did I prefer? Read on, and find out!

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    My Favourite Digimon Moments

    With the release of Digimon Adventure Tri, the Digimon franchise has begun to pick up some steam again. While the quality of this new run has been high, the previous seasons had more than their fair share of high quality moments.

    Herein, we look at a small handful of Digimon’s best moments from Digimon Adventure, Digimon Adventure Zero Two, Digimon Tamers and Digimon Adventure Tri. By not shying away from topics that are not commonly associated with Western children’s shows, we are able to see the characters develop through some tough moments, both physically and emotionally.

    Tailmon and Wizarmon’s relationship in the first two seasons gave us a truly heartbreaking moment in the first series of the franchise, then upped ante to revisit the story again in the second. When season three rolled around, we were thrown into a far ahrsher reality where bonds were tested (such as in the case of Ruki and Remamon) and evil acts did not always lead to an easy redemption. Now, with the original cast back together for Adventure Tri, the characters are older, and their burden is heavier, with the possibility of death being an obstacle to overcome.

    These are among my favourite moments in a wonderful franchise. What are yours?

    • Wow, this brings back childhood memories! Great list. – Emily Deibler 11 months ago
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    • Thank ypu Emily. It was fun trying to figure out which moments to put in :) – mattdoylemedia 11 months ago
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    • So much nostalgia. What a total blast! – RjWignall 9 months ago
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    • I had no idea this show was still going on...I think I'm going to have to revisit it now. – LAMead 9 months ago
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    • I actually went on a huge nostalgia trip when I watched the new Digimon – Elijah 8 months ago
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    Anime Review: Nisekoi Season 2

    Where the first season of Nisekoi succeeded in taking an unoriginal set up and creating an endearingly sweet comedy around it, the second season was tasked with providing an adequate follow-up. One problem with following a popular show is the possibility of having to make a choice between risking stagnation by continuing on the same line or switching things up a bit and risking alienation instead. Nisekoi season two takes a strange middle ground on this by playing things out in much the same way that it always has while attempting to add new elements to the already strong mix.

    New characters abound with three new faces joining up with the main cast, but the result of this is rather mixed. Given that the episode count for this season is almost half that of the first season, the newbies taking centre stage (as they should) for their introductions should ideally have been done to further the main storyline, but instead we end up with some detours and distractions from the overall plot. That said, the series continues to provide some good humour, and Hana, the workaholic mother of leading lady Chitoge is a fantastic addition to the cast. The voice cast puts in another stellar performance and both Raku and Chitoge are given some growth by the season’s end, meaning things end on a high.

    With the mix of pros and cons though, how does the series compare to the first?

    Rating: 4/5

    • I agree with everything that you mention in this review. Not only do you focus on the lens of the current season in question but also mention as part of your introduction the reason for the popularity of the first season which makes this an even stronger voice on the topic. – Kevin Mohammed 1 year ago
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    Anime that deserved another season

    There are many reasons that different anime series succeed or fail, and this can have a great bearing on whether we get to see more than one season of each show. For every run-away success, and every hit that you just can’t see the appeal of, you can guarantee that there will be at least one series that you love even though it was ratings failure. The problem then becomes that you would just love to see a second or third season, but it never materializes.

    Successes such as Spice and Wolf were certainly more than worthy of another run, but with the source material having finished, there can be little hope now of the world being revisited. Then of course, there’s those older series such Gunsmith Cats that never really had a fair shake of the stick to begin with but had material that was perfectly suitable for adaption.

    Meanwhile, the current market is full of lesser known series. Dogs: Bullets and Carnage saw an anime adaption of its original four one shots, but the ever growing storyline has yet to appear outside the manga. By now, it would be natural to doubt that we’ll see the rest reach the screen. Traversely, there is still hope for some others. D-Frag! Continues its popular madcap ways in ‘Monthly Comic Alive’ and the recent OVA could well be a hint at a further run.

    But which shows did you think deserved more time on screen?

    • Too much first-person, and not enough explanations as to why these few series deserved another season. They're also all based on the sole reason that there's more source material. Shouldn't anime-only series have higher priority to get more seasons, since adapted material can be continued outside of the adaptation if the audience goes to the source?The use of AMVs to explain the 'feel' of a show could work if they were embedded instead of linked to. – JekoJeko 1 year ago
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    • I think Dead Note deserved another season, but I can hardly imagine how it would be possible to do it without harming the story... So I have mixed feelings about that. – Paul Iago 1 year ago
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    Anime Review: Persona 4 - The Animation

    The phrase ‘anime adaption of a video game’ has had a checkered past. Given how loved Persona 4 is, there was every possibility that the anime would fail to live up to the hype at all, if for no other reason than that comparisons between media will by nature split fans. Thankfully, the series was run by AIC ASTA who brought us the phenomenal Ah! My Goddess and classic Tenchi Universe series. The pressure of this pedigree appears to have pushed the team into making something far better than it could realistically have been expected to be.

    The large but colourful and well-rounded cast ensure that the story is never without suitable foils to play off, and in turn the animation has a certain slickness to it that lends itself to this type of tale and shines in particular in the well-paced action scenes. For the most part, the series presents itself as a serious (and more than a little dark) action series, but throws in some comedy at suitable times to lighten the mood. In fact, for a short period, the series jumps into comedy overdrive and focuses on this side of the story for a few episodes before leaping headlong back into the main story.

    Of course, the series does have one lingering problem. The lead character is more than a little bland. In the games, he is a silent character and is no doubt designed as such to help the player immerse themselves in the world. Here though, he struggles to stand out against his far more interesting colleagues and, without the interactive element, this remains a constant throughout the 26 episodes. Don’t let that put you off though! The overall quality of the show ensure that this is a thoroughly enjoyable adaption and more than worthy of the Persona 4 name!

    Rating: 5/5

    • I have really been wonder what the Persona 4 anime series is like ever since playing the game and this read gave me a nice push as it gave me a general feel for it without giving too much away. Well done! ^_^ – Kevin Mohammed 1 year ago
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    • Thank you Kevin. I try not to give away too much in the way of spoilers :) – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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    Anime Review: Our Home's Fox Deity

    Our Home’s Fox Deity, also known as Wagaya No Oinari-Sama, is a genre-bent anime based on a series of light novels by Jin Shibamura. The plot is fairly standard (a family is plagued by youkai and so release the family guardian spirit to protect themselves, but said spirit has to find a way to fit in with modern society), but don’t let that fool you. While far from perfect, Our Home’s Fox Deity goes out of its way to differentiate itself from other shows with similar set ups.

    Combining elements of shōnen action, a small degree of harem-esque set-up, a smidgen of horror (including some beautifully done werewolf transformations later in the series) and boasting a fair few slice of life tendencies, it’s no wonder that the show is commonly described as not knowing what it wants to be. Rather than come across as directionless however, the genre-bending pays off thanks to a decent cast that includes a nice variety of spirits: the title fox deity Kuu switches between male, female and fox form throughout the series (it’s been locked up so long that it doesn’t remember what gender it was) and works as a fine lead. Meanwhile, Ebisu (the god of commerce) throws out some wonderful comedic moments and Daigoro the fox child is absolutely adorable. The humans, while less interesting, are not without their charms either. Misaki Sakura, the potential love interest of the elder brother in the plagued family, is an absolute hoot when she lets her paranoid mind run away with her.

    On the downside, the lack of pulling in one sure fire direction will no doubt be harder to stomach for some viewers, and it is undeniable that some characters have been given far less depth than others. In truth though, these are minor issues. The show may not be to everyones tastes as a complete package, but it can safely say that it has a little something for most. It’s simple, uncomplicated fun.

    Plus, any show that has two bath house episodes and avoids devolving into a mass of fan service gags (one is a ghost story and the other a comedy mystery) has got to be worth a look-in!

    Rating: 4/5

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      Manga that never became an Anime

      Art is subjective, and as such you could theoretically ask 100 people what their favourite song/painting/book/film etc. is and get 100 different answers. Being art forms themselves, the same can be said of anime and manga. One of the things that make them so enjoyable as art forms though, is the way they interact: manga, especially popular manga, is often adapted into an anime, giving fans the opportunity to watch their favourite characters and screen brought to life in full-blown, animated glory.

      Now, several things affect whether a manga is adapted into an anime: a suitably large fan base is a positive, the reputation and connections of the mangaka, merchandising possibilities, current market mood, potential controversies, the pacing of the story arcs … all these things can affect the chances of a series moving from the page to the screen. How each of these things is perceived in relation to the series is then of course affected to different degrees by the subjective view of those in charge of the decisions as to which series get adapted.

      The result of this is that you will likely find at least one manga series that you would absolutely love to see get the anime treatment, but it just doesn’t. But which series fit this for you? Perhaps you wanted a full-on Shōnen assault from the time travellers of Psyren? Maybe Masamune Shirow’s Orion tickles your fancy more than a new Appleseed? Does the realistic Yuri world of Octave appeal or do you prefer your romance to have a gender bent Shōjo feel like W Juliet? With a wealth of series out there, you just know that there’s something in your collection that somehow missed the animation boat.

      • Since there are now a plethora of manga series available, it would seem that many manga series that are even low in popularity now have a chance to make it onto the television and movie screens. The niche genres of the manga medium certainly allow for it (as in the case of more and more manga-based anime adaptations coming out each anime season), where there have been some pretty awful anime adaptations that only tailored to a very, very small audience. – Miguel Douglas 1 year ago
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      • I do wonder if a lot of the poor adaptions of manga are made purely because the animation companies view them as falling into a more commercially viable genre/set of tropes than some others that may be better received. – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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      • Sad for me... because anime is more readily available to me than manga is. So the only time I'd read manga is if I had already seen the anime.. :( – Tatijana 1 year ago
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      • Is there a reason the anime is more readily available out of interest? – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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      Anime Review: K Project

      K, also known as K Project, is an anime that clearly places some importance on style. Utilising a colour palette that seamlessly mixes the muted colours of Mardock Scramble with the bright tones of modern features like Summer Wars, it succeeds in creating a distinctive look of its own. Thrown in some consistently smooth animation and some well-placed visual effects and you have a series that is remarkably beautiful to watch.

      Of course, when a series places too much focus on style, there is always the risk that the balance will become skewed and any potential substance will be lost. Thankfully, K manages to avoid this pitfall by weaving an interesting story that not only steps into the territory of world building, but also provides some surprisingly well rounded characters. The perfect example of the latter being the catgirl Neko: one look at the end credits and you’d be forgiven for thinking that she’s nothing more than the token cutesy-fanservice-character. As the series progresses however, you learn that she is genuinely quite sweet and that her powers are not entirely what they seem.

      That’s not to say that K is perfect of course. No matter how cool the characters may be, it’s hard to look at them and not see other, better known characters. In all likelihood, you’ll find yourself watching the opening credits and thinking ‘Isn’t that Kanda from D.Gray-Man?’ or ‘Did I just spot Shizuo from Durarara?’ While a lack of originality in character design is a relatively minor gripe, far more umbrage could well be taken with the conclusion of the series. Throughout the show, you find little plot devices and backstories that you just wish were explored a little more than they were, but you let them slide because you expect everything to tie up in a big finale. Unfortunately, what you’re left with is a scenario where some things reach a satisfactory conclusion, but other points are left unsatisfactorily open.

      Now, it’s worth noting that K is not just a single season anime. There are a plethora of light novels and manga out there, a sequel movie has been released and second season is on the way. When you take that into account, it becomes far easier to forgive the series’ failings in ending the story. With that in mind, K becomes something that, while not perfect, is well worth investing your time in.

      Rating: 4/5

      • I decided to give K a try some time ago... For some reason it just didn't work out for me: it was way too stylized and even random at times (I have to be honest I stopped after episode 3). I'm sure it's a decent anime but Neko-girls and metrosexual samurai as well as 'clueless' protagonists is not really my thing. – crispychips 1 year ago
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      • 'Tis a fair comment. It's definitely one of those shows with great potential to be divisive as far as opinions go. That's the joy of anime for me though. If you don't like one show, there'll be another that you will. – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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      • Haha.. I was about to say "catgirl!!! I'm intrigued." Yep... totally would fall for any "fanservice" ploys... – Tatijana 1 year ago
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      • It surprised me as a series, I must admit. It has plenty going for it in my eyes. – mattdoylemedia 1 year ago
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      Latest Comments

      mattdoylemedia

      Lilo and Stitch is easily one of my favourite Disney films 🙂

      Lilo and Stitch: The Seven Standards of Disney
      mattdoylemedia

      I still remember edutainment games like Carmen Sandiego in my youth. Given the popularity of YouTubers, this is such a good learning avenue for young teens. It’s kinda the modern equivalent of what Robin Williams’ character was trying to achieve with the dinosaur rap in Mrs Doubtfire.

      Snacks for Thought: 5 ‘Edutainment’ YouTube Channels To Improve Your Knowledge
      mattdoylemedia

      A well researched and detailed posting. Good stuff 🙂

      What the West Learned About Japanese Culture from Anime
      mattdoylemedia

      Fan service of course does not just include boob and panty shots, the term was built to include anything that will please the audience. In that respect, having a cut-out of Holo in Durarara! could be seen as fan service as it creates something that fans can look at and say, ‘Hey! How cool is that?’

      On the more sexual content though. Fan service for no reason is a pain. It doesn’t have to ruin a show, but it certainly doesn’t add to it. My problem with this sort of fan service is when it strays too low on age. With older characters like Revy in Black Lagoon for example, fan service doesn’t feel awkward to me. When you head into teenage territory that’s more likely to put me off (I’m in my 30’s, so that possibly has a bearing on that). When you stray to the lower end of teens and beyond, that’s my cue to switch off. I personally find it equally shocking and disgusting that there’s a market for stuff like that.

      Fanservice in Anime: Perception Versus Intent
      mattdoylemedia

      Disney as a whole is showing signs if evolving I think. Look at them portraying lesbian parents in an episode of Good Luck Charlie for example. That would never have happened years ago. This sort of evolution is important to remain culturally relevant and I’m glad that Disney is embracing it. Having strong role models from all walks of life is important for kids and Disney have a lot of power to do good there.

      Masculinity and the Disney Princess
      mattdoylemedia

      I on’t suppose you know if Tri is set before or after Digimon Adventure Anode/Cathode? I’m jsut wondering if Ryo is likely to appear, as he’s the one that ties Adventure and Tamers together as timelines.

      Digimon: Analyzing the Impact of the Monster Franchise
      mattdoylemedia

      Another thing that I liked was that it touched on things like parental separation, loss (my word Wizardmon’s death was heartbreaking), depression, morality and so on where most western kids shows at the time didn’t (maybe Animals of Farthing Wood did to a degree, at least with death) to the same degree.

      Excellent. I am very much looking forward to Tri 🙂

      Digimon: Analyzing the Impact of the Monster Franchise
      mattdoylemedia

      You really did do a great job. I think that knowing that kids today still enjoy it as a franchise is a testament to its quality too. I do still need to watch Tri though. I must some time aside for that.

      Digimon: Analyzing the Impact of the Monster Franchise