Mariel Tishma

Mariel Tishma

Mariel Tishma is a student at Columbia College Chicago where she is studying creative writing. She firmly believes that everyone and everything has a story to tell.

Junior Contributor II

  • Lurker
  • Sharp-Eyed Citizen
  • ?
  • Articles
    1
  • Featured
    1
  • Comments
    6
  • Ext. Comments
    6
  • Processed
    8
  • Revisions
    6
  • Topics
    3
  • Topics Taken
    1
  • Notes
    10
  • Topics Proc.
    6
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    234
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    141

    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

    1

    Santa Claus as a Chaotic Figure

    St. Nick/Santa Claus is often presented as a jolly, warm, and overall positive spirit of the holiday season. However, a closer look at other culture’s "St. Nick" figures (creepier ones like Krampus) and the like could present a darker side. Aside from that, the article would also discuss or look at the deeper motivations behind the St. Nick figure. Why make toys? Why distribute them? What is his motivation? In some ways Santa can be considered "chaotic good"–a figure operating generally for good under their own moral structure. No one has told St. Nick to do these things, he does so of his own volition and for his own reasons. Whose system of morals does the Santa judge children by? What would happen if children were judged on a different system of morals–perhaps "good" children were no longer the traditional moral good, but rather the most ambitious or the most cunning children? Additionally, the santa *punishes* bad children. This goes against the traditional "reform" system where those who are bad are brought gently to good. Krampus type figures even bodily kidnap or harm children to punish them. (A fun and possibly seasonal article.)

    • Interesting topic! I like it. But it might help to ground it in some specific movie versions of Santa. Maybe even including the Grinch Who Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss? – Ben Hufbauer 1 month ago
      1
    2

    Do Settings in Movies Still Matter?

    It seems that in most popular movies the set or the setting isn’t considered as complexly as the setting of say, a stage play or novel, would be. The article would seek to understand the purpose behind settings in modern films, and if they are (or ever were) an extension of the message the film was trying to get across. Consider the following: Does it really matter that the fight took place in a warehouse instead of an alley? Are there cases where the setting is still heavily influenced by symbolism and imagery? Is it all about the mood or is there something deeper?

    • Not many people notice or would write about something like this, so as far as originality goes, this is a good topic. I feel as though it does matter on the type of movie. Good horror movies need a proper setting, as well as action movies. With dramas and comedies, not as much. The more visually-based the story is, the more important that the setting fits the story. A good love story or comedy can be told from almost any setting and work, but an action/horror movie with a bad setting basically makes no sense. So I believe it does matter whether the fight is in a warehouse or alley, but it doesn't matter as much whether the star-struck lovers are in medieval England or post Civil war America. – MikeySheff 2 months ago
      1
    • I would think that settings would still matter anywhere, because there's all kinds of reasons why someone would want to stage a fight in a warehouse or an alley. It can range from being believable to matching the kind of tone that the movie is going for. So I think any one who would start thinking about this topic will start thinking about not only in-universe, but production-wise as well. – DanielMichael 2 months ago
      0
    3

    Merits of writing longhand versus typing

    Many of the old "classic" writers chose to write all their work by hand first and then type, if typing was available at all. Has the use of the computer and typing improved writers ability to perform their craft? Do writers today who choose to write long hand have an advantage?

    • Typing definitely reduces the amount of time spent for writing. However, some writers who choose to write longhand do so because it's their work habit. I think writing longhand helps them spot errors more because looking at a screen might be more difficult for some writers. – seouljustice 3 months ago
      0
    • The act of writing with an instrument in hand infuses one's heart and soul into the work. It is like a tear sliding down the cheek: you feel it. Typing is more like work - just getting it on the page. Forming letters, words, and phrases in ink from a perfectly proportioned pen with the color that fits the mood allows the writer to bleed out on the page. No keyboard can replicate the bond that ink from the hand creates. – ajforrester75 3 months ago
      0
    • The writer might also look into the way the brain works when handwriting versus typing. Handwriting is more engaging than typing. You can cross out words and write small notes to yourself as you go along. There are ways to do that in a word document; however, it really isn't the same. – krae29 3 months ago
      2
    • It may be individual. For example, when I write with a pen, it makes me feel kind of secure. Not just because, unlike with computers, I’m sure my writing will not be accidentally erased or deleted but also because it gives this unexplainable feeling of close friendship with pen & paper) It’s the kind of feeling you have if you prefer printed books over e-books. It also makes my piece feel more real, for some reason. Writing longhand is time-consuming, it’s true. But for someone like me, it reduces anxiety, which is more important to me (if only I don’t feel the deadline’s breath against my back – then the anxiety is inevitable, anyway :)). So, I usually write my stuff down and then put my headphones on with some Aretha playing and start typing it on my computer almost automatically – weirdly enough, I enjoy typing as a separate activity which I cannot properly combine with the writing process that requires concentration deeper than one I have when just typing comments or messages. Plus, papers with handwriting gain even sentimental value through the years. I suppose, I’m a bit old-fashioned and embarrassingly not ‘technology-fluent’ as for a millennial (first time calling myself this way)). I guess, the perfect option for me would be a typing machine – a vague compromise between velocity and cosiness. Unfortunately, I would still have to either type it once more on my computer or use some damn good scanner and a bunch of software tools to convert images into text so I could put my work on the net and have it mobile. So, objectively, it’s most beneficial to do it all A to Z on the computer, but, from an individual point of view, writing with one’s hand has some personal advantages. The evolution of technology has played a crucial role here, but the evolution of people in the context of their readiness or refusal to accept those changes is what really should be examined. – funkyfay 2 months ago
      1

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    Mariel Tishma

    Very interesting article! I’m currently a humble BA in creative writing and had never noticed (or considered) this sort of divide in the curriculum. Certainly in certain professors I’ve had but not in what we had to learn. This is certainly something to watch out for and, as a more “commercial” genre writer in these programs, hopefully something I can work to change.

    Thank you for your insight!

    Genre Fiction in University Writing Programs: No longer the MFA's Red-headed Stepchild
    Mariel Tishma

    Thank you for writing this article. I have always been fascinated with the history of the “Lost Colony” but had no idea that they might not have been lost at all. My teachers have certainly “lied” to me and perpetuated that particular myth. I will now be watching AMS with new insight.

    A Hidden Racism in American Horror Story: Roanoke
    Mariel Tishma

    They’re more like writing exercises now. I’m currently in school for creative writing and we use them in class. It’s similar actually to the thing you mentioned about thinking of a random word. We’ll go around the room and give random words and sometimes sequences of words (like a noun a verb and another noun). We’re supposed to imagine something, for each word, say if someone gave the word shoe I might see a shoe store about to be robbed or something similar. Eventually we settle on one “place” either decided ahead of time or inspired by the games. Then we might describe what’s happening there, who’s there what sounds are there out loud to the class and then on the page.

    It’s a little harder to do on one’s own, but the principle of relaxing the critic and opening up the imagination before going into writing is still good practice.

    Using Zen Philosophy to Improve Creativity and Overcome Writer’s Block
    Mariel Tishma

    I did not know there were so many games out there aimed at these specific topics. Or perhaps I did but hadn’t thought of them quite the same way as I have now that i’ve imagined the pope playing them. This concept could make for quite an interesting series. “What would Buddha play?” “What would the Dali Lama Play?” “What would Obama play?” That sort of thing.

    I also appreciate the whole idea of giving Undertale to the pope. All things considered I bet he would have loved it! So thank you for bringing that to my attention!

    What Would Jesus Play? (or, Gaming With the Pope)
    Mariel Tishma

    Yes, yes yes! I love this article in all its parts! The mention of flow reminds me a lot of the story workshop method where “games” are played to relax the inner critic and get ideas moving before actual writing begins. It’s been useful to me so far. It isn’t an exact cure of writer’s block, but it certainly helps work around it!

    Using Zen Philosophy to Improve Creativity and Overcome Writer’s Block
    Mariel Tishma

    You can teach the basics of writing: the techniques, the forms, the basics. But you can’t teach the thing that makes those forms and techniques become special for each writer and that is the individual voice. A writer’s voice is learned through the practice of writing, not through a class. Someone can have the worlds greatest theoretical knowledge of the writing craft but not be a “real” writer or a “good” writer because they haven’t put it into action. The greatest teacher to the writer is the page itself.

    At least in my humble opinion.

    Can you Teach Someone how to Become a Writer?