Qiao ChengHua

Qiao ChengHua

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Published

    The Age of the Parody

    Parodies are often mockeries of the original and always done for comedic affect, but what about them is so funny? How long have they been around and why do they persist in culture no matter how much that culture changes? Is it possible to do a parody incorrectly? When does it cross the border from parody to inappropriate slander? What are the elements of a good parody?

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      Stereotyping vs Preservation of Culture

      It would be interesting to take a closer look at cultural stereotypes in American films. It is often seen as uncreative to cast conventional roles, but what about cultural preservation? Is making the Asian character skilled in martial arts cliche or does it show a powerful tradition passed from generation to generation? Is dressing the Saudi Arabian woman in traditional clothing stereotyping or does it represent respect towards her culture? When does it change from cultural appreciation to stereotyping and what are some ways stereotyping in a movie can be harmful to a people group? What are some ways to communicate the value of other people groups without stereotyping? It might also be good to mention cultural appropriation versus cultural appreciation.

      • Would also be very interesting to take a look at exactly WHEN the stereotypes appeared and if they changed throughout history. – rp92 1 year ago
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      The Rise of the YouTuber

      Blogging is becoming very common, but video blogging even more so. These days, everyone has their own opinion and feel like it needs to be shared. Is YouTube the right way to express views and opinions? Will YouTube and video blogging one day become the main means of blogging? What effects could this have on written English and the need to read?

      • How about having a short section to describe and highlight few aspects of YouTube/video blogging. Why it is "special" or "different" from other means of blogging like Tumblr. What make it more appealing for viewers/readers? Many it could be tied to a broader issue of digital culture too. – Camella D. Kim 1 year ago
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      Latest Comments

      Qiao ChengHua

      It is rather unfortunate that people find something good and take it to the extreme for their own purposes. I’m sure some of the creators saw Madoka and loved it so much they wanted to do their own spin and struggled to find a way to make it unique. Shows like ‘Yuuki Yuna is a Hero’ and ‘Selector Infected WIXOSS’ became how they are somewhere along the development process, and I’m sure there were many reasons.

      I think the biggest issue isn’t that people try to imitate something good that works, it’s that the viewers expect it. I’m definitely guilty of this as well. I’ll use ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’ as an example. I loved that show, and when they announced ‘The Legend of Korra’ I was beyond excited. When it got down to it, though, Korra didn’t have the character development, individual plot, and overarching plot characteristics that Avatar did. I am not saying Korra was bad, it definitely wasn’t, but it *was* it’s own show, with it’s own pace, story, and development, but I didn’t want it to be. I wanted more Avatar.

      This mentality is why producers try to make something similar, yet unique, and often times fail. When something is good it is marketable and marketable is good but often leads to misleading phrases like “The Next Twilight Fan Addiction” or “Harry Potter Fans Will Love This”! At the end of the day, imitation isn’t what sells. I firmly believe that there is nothing new under the sun, so it then becomes the artist’s job to find a different perspective and a different spin for something everyone already knows.

      Madoka Magica: What Happened to the Happy World of Magical Girls?
      Qiao ChengHua

      It definitely isn’t just magical girl anime. Generation Y does seem quite infatuated with horror, and this is just one of the many affected genres.

      Madoka Magica: What Happened to the Happy World of Magical Girls?
      Qiao ChengHua

      There’s nothing wrong with that. The magical girl anime genre is targeted toward a young audience. However, I would not let a child watch Madoka Magica or Magical Girl Apocolypse. As a rough estimate, those are targeted more toward teens (14-18) and young adults (18+). If you haven’t watched Madoka Magica, I would give it a shot. If it’s not for you, it’s not for you.

      Madoka Magica: What Happened to the Happy World of Magical Girls?
      Qiao ChengHua

      I don’t think that’s being twisted. Real life is hard, and that’s something Madoka captures in a way a lot of anime don’t.

      Madoka Magica: What Happened to the Happy World of Magical Girls?
      Qiao ChengHua

      I can definitely see how that would be distracting. I’m not sure if you’ve seen Madoka Magica, but the viewers are not constantly worried about main characters dying. There are deaths and the deaths can be unexpected, but it doesn’t keep an atmosphere of “everyone is going to die.” If you’ve not seen it, I’d recommend giving it a chance.

      Madoka Magica: What Happened to the Happy World of Magical Girls?
      Qiao ChengHua

      When I first started reading the article I kind of expected to read a bit more on the psychological reasons. Things like which experiences as a child or teenager can cause a person to become obsessive and what stalking seems to fulfill in the stalker. This was definitely an interesting article though. Well put together.

      Japanese Horror and Stalker Psychology
      Qiao ChengHua

      I’ve been trying to convince one of my friends to stop talking about her story and to just write it. I hope this article will help her. I’ve never really struggled with writer’s block because I learned at a young age that you can’t just stare at the page, you have to actually try forming sentences even if you don’t like those sentences. It’s not about how good it sounds originally, it’s about getting the words down on paper. If you don’t like it you can always change it later. Thank you so much for writing this!

      Attention Writers: The Myth of Writer's Block
      Qiao ChengHua

      One of the hardest things about watching foreign television is that it’s about as real as any television: far from the truth. Just looking at American television, life here is rarely anything like that. Certain social constructs and ideas that are commonplace will find their way in, but it isn’t always the norm. In the case of cosmetic surgery in South Korea, yes, it is commonplace, though I’m sure there is a portion of the population that is still not comfortable with viewing cosmetic surgery as a good thing.

      The thing is, if we don’t live in South Korea, if we do not live in the culture, abide by the culture, and understand the culture, we cannot pass judgement on their culture. Compare it to any social hot topic in your country. What does the majority of the populace think? Other countries may disagree with that point of view and while other countries might agree that it’s. It is the same with cosmetic surgery in South Korea. Just because it is different from our culture doesn’t mean it’s incorrect.

      200 Pounds Beauty: South Korea's Plastic Surgery Industry