Sean Navat Balanon

Sean Navat Balanon

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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Latest Topics

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The Power of Magic in The Fairly OddParents

Timmy Turner possesses a huge amount of power through his Fairy Godparents. Although limited at times due to Da Rules, Timmy still has the ability to make significant changes in his life and in the world around him with a single wish. It is made clear that each wish has a consequence to which Timmy is made to face and cope with. In dire situations, Timmy risks the loss of his Fairies ("Abra-Catastrophe) and he turns down the chance at a better life as a result of his parents finding out the truth about his evil babysitter, Vicky ("Channel Chasers"). It is only after Timmy realizes the repercussions of magic that he makes these decisions that determine him keeping or losing his Fairies, and in turn determining the outcome of his life with his family and friends who are not aware of magical beings.

Discuss and analyze the power that Timmy Turner possesses through Cosmo and Wanda. What kind of knowledge does he gain through his interactions with his Fairies and other magical beings? How does this shape Timmy’s identity throughout the series?

  • Tell me about tremendous power. The fairies said dragons are impervious to magic but bringing a dead guy back to life in the exact same episode... No problem. :D Good idea. – SpectreWriter 1 year ago
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  • I like this! There are a lot of insane episodes where he chooses not to do something that could solve whatever issue they've gotten into, but instead goes with a minor, meaningless wish. It's very interesting. – Kendall 1 year ago
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Latest Comments

Sean Navat Balanon

Great article~ I joined Pottermore when it first launched, but couldn’t really get into the swing of it due to the lack of interaction with other users. It became boring really quick. I did appreciate the illustrations and new reading material though.

The Lost Civilization of Pottermore
Sean Navat Balanon

Great analysis. The different examples you brought in really support the article. I find it interesting how the media portrays the villains in ways similar to the Nazi aesthetic, thus presenting to the audience that they should be against such movements in real life. Is pop culture convincing us to conform to this nonconformity? Ah-ha~

Star Wars, Nazis, and the Politics of Nonconformity in American Pop Culture
Sean Navat Balanon

Great intro into the subculture and artform that is cosplay. I wasn’t aware that its origins stem from the 1930s. Wonderful!

An Overview of Cosplay: Exploring the Subculture
Sean Navat Balanon

Really in-depth! I like that you’ve made the point of it being timeless due to its history and identity. In relation to modern pop music, folk music certainly stands the test of time.

Folk Music: A Timeless Genre
Sean Navat Balanon

I do enjoy some slice of life anime, and I’m glad you included Ouran as an example. I never would have thought to classify Haruhi Suzumiya and Chuunibyou under the slice of life genre though, but they do fit well into your theme of Insane Sanity.

Slice of Life Anime: Insane Sanity
Sean Navat Balanon

Very engaging article. I’ve been waiting to read something that describes sex in cinema as something more than just smut or a product for male-gaze. The examples you bring up and how you’ve explained them give a good look into how we can analyze different films and really see these scenes for what they’re meant to be.

Sex in Cinema: Poetry vs. Pornography (Explicit Content)
Sean Navat Balanon

I read Lost at Sea a few months ago, and found how O’Malley presented Raleigh’s inner conflict very interesting. As readers, we’re taken inside Raleigh’s mind and become aware of what she is experiencing. Everything happening externally on their road trip felt very fleeting in opposition to the internal. Which had a good impact, I feel — it’s relatable, as far as dealing with your own interior life while you navigate the exterior, where others may not be so aware of what you’re going through.

What Lost at Sea can Teach us About Anxiety and Depression
Sean Navat Balanon

I enjoyed reading how poetry is used as a platform for truth — more so than the news and multimedia of the time (and even in our present time). Poetry certainly serves as an outlet to express oneself more openly, which you’ve made clear in your writing with the great war poets. Fantastic work.

Poetry and the Great War Soldiers: Necessity of Emotion