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Black Panther

Back-story on the Black Panther that we did not get in Civil War and that we did not see from the Black Panther himself. How he became Black Panther is more depth – because the movie did not go into much of that aspect because of the movie coming out in a few years. This could be the evolution of Black Panther and how he got to be where and who he is, if it differs between what was stated in Civil War.

  • I would read that. However, there is a movie coming, so whoever wants to pick this topic should consider that. At the very least, address it. – ismael676 9 months ago
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  • I do think the choice to leave a lot of his backstory from Civil War was so they have things to show in his standalone film. It would really just be a re-hash of his old comics – darcvader 9 months ago
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  • The Black Panther comic series was canceled for quite a while after the rise of Malcom X and the Black Panthers, due to worries that people may associate the two. Should look into that more, and talk about that.If looking up racially problematic characters, anyone interested should also look up Marvel's Captain Nazi, or the fact that Superman fought Hitler in the comics. – Truthsayer87 9 months ago
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  • Whoever takes this should look at it more thematically, rather than just doing a straight history (which can easily be found on Comic Vine, Wikipedia, etc.). Rather than who he is, I'd encourage the author to look at what he stands for and represents in society. What are enduring aspects of his characterization (not just character), as he is passed from writer to writer? What do his continued associates (Storm, etc.) suggest about him? – m-cubed 2 months ago
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The Advent of Independent Comics: Why Writers Are Starting To Right Their Own Stories

It is no secret that Marvel and DC are the top comic book publishers in the industry. But in recent years, many famous writers and artists like Jonathan Hickman and Rick Remender have left the publishers and have started to create comics for Image Comics or other independent publishers. The results are critically acclaimed comic book series that have become very popular among the comic book community. It would be nice to explore the reasons why comic book writers and artists are leaving Marvel or DC to create their own comics with independent publishers like Image Comics. An examination could even be done into what Image Comics and other independent publishers offer writers and artists that Marvel or DC does not.

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    Mentorship and Parenting in Batman Comics

    In comics, mentor figures are critical to the development of super heroes. Batman is by far one of the most famous characters in comics and his origins involves the death of his parents. Despite being considered the "Dark Knight" and usually being considered a isolated character, the Batman mythos involves a large amount of mentoring and parenting within its long history. In many comics such as Scott Snyders new 52 Batman and Batman Earth One, Alfred moves beyond a servant figure to acts as a supportive and mentoring parental figure for Bruce Wayne as he struggles with his role as Batman. This relationship remains a critical and long lasting relationship for Batman. Additionally, throughout his history, Batman has mentored a variety of side kicks including the robins (Dick Grayson, Jason Todd, Tim Drake, Stephanie Brown, Damian Wayne, and Carrie Kelly), Batgirls, and others, acting as a mentor figure, and sometimes a parental figure (in the case of Damian, Bruce is his father). I think this is a rich area for analysis and that it would valuable to examine the parental and mentor relationships within Batman comics, there success and failures, as well as how they impact our hero.

    • This seems like it would be a good topic. I would explore each Robin's backstory and how Batman was able to be a mentor to them aside from making them his sidekicks. – BMartin43 3 months ago
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    The Little World of Liz Climo: The Aesthetics of Adorableness

    Discuss the career and works of Simpsons-animator, children’s author, and web-comic artist, Liz Climo ((link) . What factors may have led to her success? What is it about her simple, one to two panel comics that makes them so cute and heartwarming? Are there aesthetic standards within the often-neglected form of one/few-panel comics by which her work may be critically evaluated? Where is her place within the long tradition of this form, among artists such as Hank Ketcham, Bil Keane, Gary Larson, Dan Piraro, and countless others? In what ways has her online presence contributed to her work and distribution, as well as the contemporary cultural understanding that comics in the 21st century can exist in spaces beyond the "funny papers"?

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      The Symbolism of Superman

      As a comic book character, few have garnered the notoriety that Superman has. This topic calls for an investigation into the character’s history and an investigation into the symbols the character has come to represent over the years. Questions for investigation may include: How has Superman changed over the decades, and why did these changes occur? What type of ideology does Superman best represent?

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        Aging in Comic Books

        In comic books, character traditionally stay young forever. However, in the past 30 or so years, several important and critically acclaimed stories have focused on aging super hero characters. Stories like the Dark Knight Returns (Batman) and Old Man Logan (Wolverine) have aged their respective characters well into middle age. These stories are considered some of the best for their respective characters (DKR is a landmark title) but how are these characters different than their younger counterparts. What is the impact of aging super heroes, who are traditionally portrayed as eternally young. How does the reader’s perception of these characters change when they grow old or advance in age?

        • Interesting topic. It could be interesting to also discuss why Spiderman hasn't aged much in his comics, since many have already made fascinating commentary on that (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1dO462ufLc; worth watching the whole thing, but relevant content begins at 4:22). – ProtoCanon 4 months ago
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        • Another interesting affect this has on characters is the sliding time line of their back stories. Sometimes the writers can retcon this sort of stuff with little fuss, i.e. punisher fighting in Vietnam is changed to Iraq. But for a character like Magneto, whose origin story and, by extension, entire world view stem from his experience of the Holocaust, it's very hard to explain why he's not dead at this point.I don't know if you want to touch on this also, but related to this issue is the fact that characters who never age never die(and if they do, comic book death is cheap). So we have golden age, silver age, bonze age, and modern age heroes all occupying the same stage, all very nearly the same age. This presents especially interesting problems for legacy characters with large families. Take the bat family, that has something like four robins, three batgirls, and a bat-woman in it right now. And I think all four people who've held the flash mantel are alive now too. Not to mention the 6(?) green lanterns currently inhabiting sector 2814. Crises only keep these characters dead for so long. – ealohr 4 months ago
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        • Also worth noting is how lack of aging can be tied to lack of development in characters, so writers often reuse the same story tropes instead of letting the characters progress (i.e. the reversal of Peter and MJ's marriage leaving Peter as a single guy again, or bringing Aunt May back to life). – jnardone 4 months ago
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        Suicide Squad: Movie VS. Comic(s)

        What was similar and what was different between the Suicide Squad comic and the film? What elements, including characters, from the comic could have made the movie better? What elements from the comic, including characters, would have made the movie worse?

        • This topic could also include the Suicide Squad animated movie. I haven't watched the new movie or read the comics but my love for the animation is what makes me hesitant, since it was so well done. What elements were in both, what was left out? They're both just movies so it's perhaps easier to go into what could and should have been cut to fit an appropriate feature length. – Slaidey 5 months ago
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        • The shared the adventurous, defeat a villain and their army aspect, but what the film lacked was a central point. There was no room for character development with such a huge cast and many characters to follow. The film itself should have lastes at least 2.5 hours if not 3 hours. Really hoping the extended edition fixes this problem. – carlospena 5 months ago
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        • The comic was way better. They tried to put ever comic into the movie in under 2 hours. – mikka1321 4 months ago
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        Wonder Woman: The Evolution

        Since the film has been made and a trailer (maybe more than one) has been released as well – let’s give some background to comic readers who may not know about WW. Explain Wonder Woman’s relationship with herself, the Justice League, and how she came to be who she is today. Also, tieing in the new comic series she has had and seeing where the movie could potentially take from that instead of taking from the older versions of Wonder Woman.

        • This has already been published here: http://the-artifice.com/wonder-woman-history/ – Misagh 5 months ago
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        • Thank you! I meant an updated version [I added it in there], she has a new comic series out from 2016! I wanted to focus on that and how the movie will (maybe) adapt to the newer comics being made recently instead of adapting to the older ones and making it more updated in a sense – scole 5 months ago
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