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Attracted to the Rebel.

For as long as I can remember even as a kid I’ve always been lured toward the ‘rebel’ character in movies, books, TV shows, you name it. For example, my favourite character in Harry Potter is Draco Malfoy, in Beauty and the Beast it’s Gaston, James Dean is my favourite of all time and was the KING of the rebels. would love to see this topic being discussed and about because I truly want to know what this attraction is and why it exists among so many people (I know I’m not the only one).

  • Perhaps in order to make this a topic targeted at a full audience, you could broaden this to discuss what exactly makes the 'rebel' character in stories appealing? Analysing their characteristics and the most common tropes used with these characters to determine which qualities make them so exciting and relatable to fans has the potential for an intriguing article. – SophIsticated 5 years ago
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  • I think this would be more interesting if you examined this from a historical perspective, particularly with reference to gothic literature, which blurred the line between protagonist, hero and antagonist. More recently, this is exemplified in works such as those you have cited as well as cult series like Twilight. I would suggest that analysing the historical significance of these literary works and devices would make for a more thorough and thought-provoking discussion. – bethlauren 4 years ago
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  • Nice topic. :) It occurs to me, you may need to differentiate between "rebel" and "villain." Are they always one and the same--and in cases where they are, why is that? For example, Gaston is definitely a villain. Draco is definitely an adversary of Harry's, but does he become more sympathetic as he gets older, or less? What about female rebels--do they look and act different than male ones, and why? (I noticed all your choices were male, which isn't a problem. But you might delve into gender differences if there's time). – Stephanie M. 4 years ago
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  • I believe that attraction does not necessarily originate from beauty, but from anything that instils intense emotion (regardless of its type) in the audience. Take Marilyn Manson for instance: he works with the aesthetic of grotesque and controversial topics in order ton provoke reactions and opinions. What attracts us is not what we want, but what intrigues our nature. – andagonistic 4 years ago
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  • I think discussing maybe traits to people like in a Rebel would really benefit the article to help your readers connect. – JackWalsh 4 years ago
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  • This topic could become quite nuanced. As already mention, there would need to be a clarification between rebel and villain, and it could even be anaylsed how 'rebels' have changed over the decades, if at all. – taraeast88 4 years ago
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  • I'm not sure if Gaston is the rebel in Beauty and the Beast. In fact I would argue that Belle is in fact the true rebel, as Gaston fits into the mold that villagers expect out of him, while Belle is outcasted for her differences. Belle goes against the status quo, while Gaston works towards fulfilling it. Also I think this is a super interesting topic! – eugeneleec 4 years ago
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  • Perhaps research into Machiavellian villains which has the idea of very evil characters, and yet are portrayed as very attractive (E.g. Edmund in King Lear). The idea of the byronic hero could also be useful (although they are heroes, they have that rebellious and sometimes dark nature to them). – Henry 4 years ago
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