ChrisBryz

ChrisBryz

Rutgers graduate with a B.A. in English.

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Latest Articles

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The dynamic of Jackson Healy and Holland March in The Nice Guys

Analyse the dynamic between Russell Crowe’s character and Ryan Gosling’s character in the new movie, The Nice Guys. I find that this dynamic is a new take on noire films. Perhaps a new era of this genre that involves two unlikely characters that find themselves in a particular situation; considered to each as the "big dirty." For once, it doesn’t seem to involve the cops. . . and has sense of humor.

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    Latest Comments

    ChrisBryz

    Hahaha, yeah. Spawn will blow your mind. He’s a character created by Todd Mcfarlane. Perhaps the most dismal depressing anti-hero. Still a badass though. Thanks for your response by the way. I really loved your article. It gave a different perspective and background on villains. Keep up the writing!

    Superhero Villains and their Struggle with Morality
    ChrisBryz

    Apart from real poetry written by real soldiers, Music has an influence on the experience of the post-war life equally as well as what was experienced during the given war. I believe that this generation uses the older wars as allegories to relative problems that our veterans now face. I am an avid listener to concept artists that imply such case to their music, and it has a profound affect on me. On exceptional band is Defeater. The story follows a WWI veteran and his life since the war, his shared travels with a boy who leaves a disheveled family and how his war stories implore a revitalization toward the boy’s predicament. The music in tandem with the lyrics give a reflective experience.

    Poetry and the Great War Soldiers: Necessity of Emotion
    ChrisBryz

    The case you make on villains is valid and I agree with the majority of what you have stated. Superheros are the ego of what is good and the alter ego to that would be anything bad. The derivative of good is found in the case of, let’s say Batman. His vendetta toward Gotham of his parents death keeps his morals in check. He takes the face of his fears to fight all that is the evil in Gotham. His enemies are evil in the sense that they attest to Batman’s vendetta. . . simply put.

    However, Batman is also considered a anti-hero because of his gloomy past and what the new movies have set him out to be etc. To take a fall for what is right, Batman must take the face of what is wrong.

    Now, another anti-hero that I identify with is Spawn. He was not mentioned in this article for which is why I am commenting. Spawn’s dilemma is that he was originally was a bad dude. A CIA killing machine that when at the face of death, he made a deal with the devil to live again only to see his wife again. I am questioning what makes a man evil opposed to being good. Because Spawn, he is caught right in between. After selling his soul to the devil, he is confronted with a moral dilemma. no matter what he does, killing bad guys for the right reasons, their souls are sent straight to Malebolgia’s army, strengthening its numbers for Armageddon. Spawn made a deal with the devil based on a selfish sentiment. He takes actions to correct it by protecting children etc, but at a catch 22.

    My point that I am trying to make is, villains sometimes have an inner conflict that isn’t reflected properly. It’s like the argument of free-will vs. fate. Sometimes the human condition is damned to the point where evil is defined just by selfish acts.

    I would love to hear anyone’s response to this. Thanks!

    Superhero Villains and their Struggle with Morality
    ChrisBryz

    Hey Kevin,

    Yes! My thoughts exactly. There is much to be explored from Poe’s works. Outstanding synopsis by your hand, by the way. It is just the article that ignites the intuitive thinking behind his genius, and you elaborated it well.

    The Melancholy of Two Ushers: Into the Mind of Poe
    ChrisBryz

    This article has answered some ambiguity that I have been experiencing with this story. Establishing Poe’s background and his psychological approach towards his works cleared it up as well. A note that I have wondered pertaining to this story is Usher’s opium consumption. Is there evidence that this was done because of his hypochondria and using that as an excuse to be an addict? I am aware of Poe’s excessive drinking, but he often mentions opiates in his stories. I wonder if the affects of this consumption is emulated through his characters.

    The Melancholy of Two Ushers: Into the Mind of Poe