Alora

Alora

B.A. Comm., professional communicator, former news writer, current Netflix watcher, and television fanatic.

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Latest Topics

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Using Sexual Assault as a Plot-Driving Device

HBO’s Game of Thrones has never shied away from tackling controversial subjects but a season five episode went too far for some viewers.

Sansa Stark’s rape scene caused uproar among fans and critics alike. Popular feminist website, The Mary Sue, has sworn off promoting the show following the controversial episode. See below statement:

(link)

Are there instances in popular television in which sexual assault and abuse has been handled with care and sensitivity? How can writers handle this controversial topic without falling into a TV trope?

  • Very interesting topic with a lot of potential for exploration. I really hope this ends up being an in-depth article on The Artifice. – Abhimanyu Shekhar 5 years ago
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  • There was a recent episode in Season 3 of Orange is the New Black that deals with the rape of a major character, Pensatucky, with great sensitivity. I think if rape is used as a plot device, this episode can be a sort of guide for how it can be dealt with. The way it was depicted in the show was more so a criticism of how society deals with rape and sexual assault, rather than showing it for shock value. – Emilie Medland-Marchen 5 years ago
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  • Very interesting topic! I already wrote something for The Artifice a few weeks ago dealing with sexual assault in Game of Thrones. It was hard to write about, and I am always interested in how other shows succeeded or failed in dealing with such hard scenes. – HeatherDeBel 5 years ago
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All Male Panelists at Denver Comic Con's 'Women In Comics' Panel

The convention held in Denver, Colorado featured no female panelists and an attendee alleges one of the male panelists explained the lack of female comic creator on the fact, "girls get bored with comics easily". (Source: The Hollywood Reporter, "What Happened After Denver ComicCon Ran A "Women in Comics" Panel Without Any Women")

Is it necessary for con panels about women to be hosted by all-female panelists or could it be a mix of genders? What was the more troubling part of this event, the fact there were no female panelists or the comments made by the male panelists of Denver ComicCon organizers?

  • This is SO important to shed light on! You have to write this! – CassDM 5 years ago
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  • This irritated me so much. Woman should be handling this topic. – KatieNoelWinters 5 years ago
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  • I don't feel that the panel need be entirely female to be a success, however, for it to be all male is a complete disaster.If the article explored the merits of mixed gender vs mono gender would help create perspective.My initial comment, regarding mixed, is more that it would open the panel to a male representative, not as a driver, but as someone to be available for questions and opinions, where appropriate. But however, entirely unnecessary or a requirement.There are many great women in comics, Trudy Cooper is one that comes to mind, who would be entirely brilliant on a panel. Add Rebecca Sugar, and you've got an awesomely weird mix of content :) – carboncopyben 5 years ago
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Latest Comments

Alora

I believe there is a certain amount of emotional attachment to these films as well. I would say humans are inherently egotistical and seeing our history up there on the big screen makes us feel important. We also feel a kinship with those on the big screen because now we have an understanding and connection with these historical (whether fabricated, exaggerated, or real) figures.

Sometimes it gives voice to otherwise unheard stories, such is the case in films like 12 Years a Slave. These allow an outlet for groups who are traditionally silenced to share their impact on our history and their struggles. In the same breath, those who aren’t members of the group feel they have a different understanding of the others’ suffering.

During your research, did you find any socio-political dramas slated to be hits but flopped at the box office?

Socio-Political Drama: The Genre That Never Disappoints
Alora

An interesting companion to this piece is the documentary Please Subscribe. Its from 2012, so most of the references and vloggers are actually already outdated, but there is some interesting discussion about the nature of the YouTube business.

YouTube has taken celebrity culture to a new level. Its strange because these vloggers make achieving stardom easy and contribute to our obsession with achieving fame.

Vlogging has the ability to spark so many different discussions. I love it!

YouTube Capitalism: Vlogging Celebrities and Advertisers
Alora

I believe Beth may have been unpopular in her beginnings, simply because the writers weren’t giving her much material to work with. But as the author of this piece said, she went through a huge transition and for many fans, was becoming a favourite. Her character had more depth and with that, more fans. Judging by TWD fan outcry, this was not a popular decision.

The Fridging Dead: The Walking Dead's Patriarchal Problem
Alora

There is the strangest, most magical feeling about walking through the Disney gates. It is impossible to explain it to someone who hasn’t been. My fiance and I are going in September/October for our honeymoon. He hasn’t been and I can’t wait to show him how special of a place it is! Despite all of the negative, anti-consumerist drama that surrounds The Most Magical Place On Earth, I can’t help but love it there!

Great article!

6 Reasons People Continue to Visit Disney World