Antebellum

Antebellum

English Rhetoric major. Working on becoming a published horror novelist and Technical Writer in the future. Lover of anime, movies, TV, music and so much more.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Published

    Downloadable Content - Difference Between a Cash Grab and Actual Content

    So many games lately have been focusing on releasing hoards of extra content after the base game’s release. Sometimes, there is the season pass system, which doesn’t even offer you access to all of the content that will be released (look at Borderlands and Fall Out for two quick examples), or sometimes, the content just really isn’t that impressive and makes you wonder why it wasn’t included in the base game (look at the new Lego Games and Batman).

    But then there’s games like the new The Witcher – where the add-on content adds almost a whole new game onto what has already been released.

    Why is there such a huge range in terms of what game development companies are doing? Are some truly just attempts to get more cash out of consumers for their products? Is content like The Witcher’s expansions a sign of more dedicated developers? Why are so many games seeming to cost more and more, with less value being added?

    • Definitely a topic worth writing about. As you stated, there's such a wide margin for what qualifies as DLC and what qualifies as a completed game. I think the mentality for developers has become "Well, if we don't finish this before release, we'll just make fans buy a Season Pass for content that should've been in the main game!"Speaking personally, I think the quality of games has gone downhill a lot in the recent decade. You used to be able to count on that you were getting what you paid for, and I understand development is a time consuming process but...at least give me a game that's not in pieces at the end of it all. – Nayr1230 11 months ago
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    • I'd like a layer of real-world research in this piece, exploring rate of production/speed of release and number of costly DLC's. To better explain: are companies forcing games into the public's hands before they're fully complete, knowing that the skeleton structure of a game will demand a DLC? Or are they flushing out fully realized games, taking their time in creation, writing and production, and then providing additional outlets for further exploration. – Piper CJ 11 months ago
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    • Check out the game Evolve, and how it's undergone a complete resdesign in its philosophy concerning DLC. Also, talk about "On-Disc DLC," where content is already in the game, just gated behind a paywall to unlock it at a later date (like the latest Street Fighter installment). – Tarben 9 months ago
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    • Don't get me started on Starwars Battlefront and how it changed the way we play video games; for the worst that is – Riccio 9 months ago
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    • Riccio, I think you just came up with a great topic. – Tigey 8 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Antebellum

    Those are great examples. The focus here was supposed to be on the popular European fairy tales, written by Perrault and The Brother’s Grimm, and the ones that were in particular turned into the popular Disney films that we know today.

    I do agree that not all fairy tales have the issues that these ones have – it’s just these ones in particular that should be under some scrutiny because of their historical purpose and content.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Antebellum

    I really enjoyed reading this. I have been disappointed by so many trailers which give away the entirety of the movie before I even get to see it, which is why sometimes I like just going in blind to a movie.

    Nice to see this kind of argument backed up by solid proof and analysis!

    Time to Trim Trailers? The Death of Surprise in Modern Hollywood
    Antebellum

    I think there needs to be more of a balance. Going too far one way or another doesn’t solve anything.

    Given that life itself rarely exists in extremes, but more of a grey area, I think any modern fairy tale retellings need to shoot for that, rather than the extreme ends of the spectrum that seem to exist.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Antebellum

    They do represent goodness, but there is just the aspect of them being too good. Having that kind of message pushed as being ideal behaviour, being that unattainably perfect person… Well, real people can’t really handle that. It just creates undue pressure, in my opinion.

    Thanks for reading though! Glad you enjoyed it.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Antebellum

    That’s why I tried to touch on the somewhat unrealistic expectations that they set for males as well. Gender roles nowadays don’t conform to the roles that these stories were trying to teach – as you said, the readership no longer exists.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Antebellum

    Thanks so much. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Antebellum

    I feel it’s different when those “fantasy creatures” are people, which was discussed in the article.

    The stories were originally designed as prescriptions and ways to teach behaviour for males and females. The fairy tales were based on the societies that they were intended to teach, as well.

    I am not interested in the comments that they make on people, but rather what they are teaching those that interact with them today. Every form of writing is a type of communication, with both implied and inherent messages. The messages that some of these fairy tales can send are problematic for today’s society, because they don’t mesh with the way expectations and progressions in roles have changed for all people.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"