KeeleyFaith

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    The Power of the Powerless Jane Austen

    Analyze Mrs. Bennet and Mr. Wickham from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. The common connection with these characters is that they both scheme to escape their powerlessness in the British social structure of the time period. Possible that the novel was Jane Austen’s own scheming to escape powerlessness and comment on that society?

    • What do you mean by "powerless" in this context? It might be helpful to clarify that before you delve too deeply into this topic. – Luthien 6 years ago
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    • The article could also address how Austen couldn't even publish under her own name since it was viewed as unladylike. – Liz Watkins 6 years ago
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    literature
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    A Psychoanalytic reading of 50 Shades of Grey

    It has come to my attention that many people overlook the most obvious reading of these novels because of the erotic content of the novels. Christian Grey shows clear signs of repression of his violent childhood memories and displacement of the anger cause by that childhood onto the women he enters into BDSM relationships with.

    • I can see how this might become... bland. The whole "rough childhood transitioning into a violent adulthood" is a lot like the "it was all a dream" ending: possibly effective, but runs the risk of becoming a lazy explanation for the current disposition of a character. Whoever does pick this one up, try and add more than just the typical signs and traits of traumatic early experiences and stick to the novel more than the psychology. – Austin 6 years ago
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    • I don't believe Psychologists would call psychoanalysis a "lazy explanation for the current disposition of a character," because psychoanalysis is a completely valid explanation for every person's current disposition--not excluding fictional characters. Many people disregard psychology as excuses for behavior and ailments, but that is simply ignorance and lack of understanding. This novel actually has quite a lot of support from those suffering from psychological illnesses for bringing to light social taboos and fostering understanding for those who take part in them. – KeeleyFaith 6 years ago
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    • I don't mean from a psychological point of view, more from a literary one. Nor do I mean that the "lazy explanation" bit applies specifically to this novel. I just pointed those out because a past trauma is an easy way to give the character a reason to act a certain way but is sometimes done lazily so as to give the impression of false depth. – Austin 6 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    It makes perfect sense that the Hobbits are the heroes of the LOTR trilogy. Tolkien was undoubtedly a true Romantic author.

    Hobbits: Tolkien's Unlikely Heroes

    As a feminist myself, I find that some of these deliveries blur the overall message of the feminist movement. I am referring to the self-objectifying tendencies of Beyonce, and also the obscenity of the FCKH8 video. Personally, my way of fighting for the feminist movement is simply being a successful woman and promoting the other women around me to achieve their goals. While I see the need for Feminism to be present in popular culture, I think there are more convincing ways to get that message across without compromising the value of the message with these tactics.

    Feminism in Pop Culture: the Good, the Bad, and the Topless

    A great overview of three of the novels most compelling themes!

    To Kill a Mockingbird: Discrimination Against Race, Gender, and Class