Kidcanuck

Kidcanuck

Feminist father. I read voraciously, write sporadically, and have been threatened bodily by various organizations. I love comic books, sushi, and procrastinating.

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    Latest Topics

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    Nerd Culture is Mainstream Culture

    Ed Brubaker said, "If you look at the generation now in power in the entertainment industry, they grew up with comics as serious stuff. The Geeks have won." Discuss how elements of nerd culture have become part of every day life. Technology, media, the vanishing stigma of coding. Comic books and the rise of alternative fiction. Have the Geeks won?

    • I think this would be a fun discussion to have. I think unfortunately it is never this cut and dry, those leading the entertainment industry (when looking at financial power) are not the geeks. However, with concepts such as BitCoin becoming viable, the financial viability of the gaming industry, and the franchising of Marvel, all do suggest that perhaps an argument could be made. However, part of this needs to also be, as your heading suggests, a definition of geek and nerd culture that was previously alternative culture and if these are still viable subcultures or merely part of mainstream culture. So perhaps the double edged sword of the rise and fall of geek culture? – SaraiMW 5 months ago
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    • great topic! – Amitis 5 months ago
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    • In tandem with the first comment, I think the 'why' of this topic needs to be explored carefully. Beyond the fact that people who have grown up reading comics are now in charge, what other conditions have made Nerd Culture possible? – jallegro 5 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Kidcanuck

    I agree with Jessicalea’s comment above. I think fan-fiction is an amazing starting off point for writers to develop a love of writing and to find their own style. My only fear (beside the copious cringe-worthy stories) is that fanfic encourages new writers to be shallow in their creation of characters. They don’t need to flesh out the characters in a story because they are able to rely on a fandom’s understanding of those characters. (for example: you don’t need to describe Dean from Supernatural because people who watch Supernatural know who he is, what he’s done etc.)

    The author can rely on the assumption of the reader. And that is a bad habit for a writer to get into.

    Fanfictions - Delusions or Expressions of Admiration?
    Kidcanuck

    As a white person sitting in the theatre watching Black Panther, I couldn’t help but feel that I was having a completely different viewing experience from fifty percent of the audience. I wasn’t seeing the same movie as them and that was okay.

    It was better than okay.

    It was beautiful.

    Black Panther: Not the First Black Superhero Film but the Most Impactful
    Kidcanuck

    I truly believe that there is a comic out there for everyone. The three comics that I use as “gateway” comics for non-comic readers are “I Hate Fairyland”, “Pride of Baghdad”, and “Fables”.

    I’m curious. It has been over a hear since you wrote this article. Assuming you are still on this platform to read this: do you still think there is a stigma attached to reading comic books? I think that comics (at least superhero comics) have become so integrated into modern entertainment (i.e. the popularity of the Marvel Cinematic Universe) that there’s next to no stigma attached to reading them.

    They don’t get the recognition they deserve as literature. People still put novels on a pedestal and have comics maybe on the floor leaning against the base of that pedestal. But there is movement. I think things are getting better.

    The Social Stigma of Comic Book Reading