stephameye

stephameye

I write to try to make sense of the world.

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Let's discuss the No Man's Land scene in Wonder Woman (2017)

We now live in a post-Wonder Woman live-action film world, and it’s glorious. However, Wonder Woman cinematographer Matt Jensen revealed in a recent interview that the now-iconic No Man’s Land scene almost didn’t make the cut. What do you think about that? What effect did that scene have on you? (Personally, I’ve watched the film four times now, and I still cry every time I watch that scene. I come out of the theatre wanting to flip cars!!!)

  • This is an amazing piece of film. It has amazing music and it plays a huge role in Wonder Woman's development as a hero! – Sean Gadus 3 years ago
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  • If someone from film would take it on, perhaps. I'm not sure what it does aesthetically or narratively. That's not to say it doesn't have precisely the sort of emotional impact or resonance with viewers you describe, of course. Whether someone could write a tenable essay on affect in that scene is questionable, I think. I'm confident someone could write an essay deconstructing the scene technically. – Paul A. Crutcher 3 years ago
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  • The scene can be analyzed through the lens of how difficult it is for women to express themselves publicly. Since this movie is the first superhero blockbuster with a female lead (not counting Catwoman) and the first to be directed by a woman, you can go into some detail on Patty Jenkins and her process making the film. Or even analyze how Wonder Woman proves to her comrades, and the audience, that she is a bonafide superhero who could help end the war if given the opportunity to fight in the front lines. – Rico 3 years ago
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  • Wonder Woman was a brave, much-needed and very important film for the sexist male chauvinist society of our times. – Vishnu Unnithan 3 years ago
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Latest Comments

stephameye

I agree with what you’re saying, but I’m not entirely sold. Disney princess movies over time have mostly been about the princess getting her Prince Charming at the end of the movie and living happily ever after. That’s not real life. I’d like to see movies about how their lives turned out because “happily ever after” would be so boring!

I think these princesses can definitely be seen in a feminist light, as you’ve mentioned above, but they’re also problematic as f*ck. I’m glad that Disney princess movies have gotten better at writing strong and independent female characters over time… for example, Moana teaches young girls that you don’t need a love interest to a) win your battles and b) end up with.

Feminism and Disney: They're Not As Different As You Might Think
stephameye

I never really considered this view before, though Harry’s normalcy is right in your face throughout the series. Thanks for writing this, Sarah!

Harry Potter: The Remarkably Unremarkable Main Character
stephameye

An insightful analysis… I find that, sometimes, emojis convey more meaning than words. At the end of the day, isn’t that the point of language?

Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak
stephameye

“She was sassy but clever, strong and independent, and she showed compassion without being a mother-figure to the other characters.” THIS! Women are mostly portrayed as mothers, or with motherly qualities … so it was refreshing to see such a kickass female leading role be otherwise. Star Wars was so ahead of its time, but I’m so grateful it was made when it was.

Princess Leia was the mother of all badass female film characters. May the force be with her always.

The Legacy of Princess Carrie
stephameye

Great, comprehensive analysis.

Star Wars: Who is Rey (And Why Do We Care)?