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Latest Topics

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Filler Outside Anime

Anime is mostly known for filler, but sometimes, even books or movies, TV shows or anything else, can have filler too. This article would examine such instances and how they were received.

  • Did no one catch the obvious problem with this topic before they approved it? How is Anime "mostly" known for filler? A prominent trait of Anime is filler. But Anime is "mostly known" for filler," it's mostly known for crazy hair, loud screaming, school girl sailor outfits, and magic. I get the intention of the description, I just find the opening line misleading and poorly phrased. – Jonathan Leiter 2 hours ago
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When Anime Ends

Sometimes, an Anime ends before it’s supposed to, or it ends in a poor way, a way devoid of any meaning. Surely it’s not just a decision on the part of the directors to discontinue it without giving a coherent ending. Anime like Pandora Hearts, Blood Lad, and Darker than Black gives that sort of vibe. Why does this happen, what options can a viewer explore if they want to satiate their hunger for more?

  • Some animes end because the viewer rating expectation is not fulfilled. Pandora Hearts is still ongoing as a manga, so technically it didn't end. It just wasn't funded in that medium. – Jill 2 days ago
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  • Yes, and that's sort of what I'm talking about. I know the manga is ongoing, but what caused viewer rating to go down? Why not give the first season an open-close ending and leave whether or not to continue on how things look later? – SpectreWriter 2 days ago
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  • This wouldn't have anything to do with how Gangsta ended? Because... that ended on a cliffhanger from what I heard. – DustinKop 5 hours ago
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Afterlife as Portrayed by Death Parade

Analyze the 2015 hit anime series, Death Parade, and discuss the meaning of the afterlife according to the series. What are the rules of the afterlife and the beings that reside within it? Talk about the concept of good and evil, what is deemed to be right and wrong and the effect that it has on the characters in the future.

  • I would love to write on this topic as well. Death Parade is awesome haha. But when you say the rules of the afterlife according to the series in relation to the western view of the afterlife (heaven vs hell) or in terms of reincarnation? (Like how the characters can relive their lives if they win) Also, I think you should also maybe consider the middle ground of good and evil, or the idea of the spectator, as seen through Decim. He isn't good or evil but seems to have some sense of morality? – kmjp 4 hours ago
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The Ultimate Arrow "Who's in the Grave?" Theory Roundup

Arrow season 4 spoilers.
Going on the Arrow sub-reddit there seems to be several "who’s in the grave?" everyday. I suggest having a definitive roundup of who could be the person theorised about so much. Whose death would have the biggest impact on the show? Are Felicity and Thea in the clear now that they’ve survived near death experiences? The writers/show-runners say Felicity is not in the grave, but could her body be elsewhere and the Felicity in the car with Oliver be a hallucination much like Shado was in the flashbacks.
What about Oliver’s son? He seems like the next character the show is teasing to die after Malcom told Darkh about him. Would a character the audience has seen maybe just two times leave a big enough impact on the viewers? Would they even go so far as killing off a child? Even with its somewhat darker tone, Arrow still doesn’t seem like the sort of show that would do this.
This should aim to be the definitive piece for the "who’s in the grave?" theories. Which characters make sense? Which characters don’t?
Prime candidates: Diggle, Laurel, Felicity, Thea, William Hawke and possibly Quentin Lance.
Finally, is this who grave talk taking away from the rest of the show? This seems like a tunt to get the fandom in on speculating who is going to be killed off when this could have been handled as a surprise death.

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    Pirates of the Caribbean- Should it Continue?

    Since The Curse of the Black Pearl, Pirates of the Caribbean has been a major franchise for Disney. However, ever since the end of the original trilogy, it’s sort of lost its original flair. Should it continue? What should Disney do to revive interest when the fifth one does come out? Why make more?

    • Maybe detail a few of the major flaws from On Stranger Tides, and how the series has gotten worse from it's premier to it's latest flop. – luminousgloom 23 hours ago
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    When Filler is Good

    Sometimes, filler is dreaded. It’s a time when an Anime fills in a gap with unneeded material, usually to give it’s source material time to give them more material, and fans start letting out a groan of frustration. But it’s not always bad. Sometimes, it’s good. This article would explore when filler is actually good, and by good, we define it as something that, in a way, adds something to the fictional world or plot of the show.

    • I have been actually thinking about doing an article like this! Once it gets approved, I would love to write this! – Kevin Mohammed 1 day ago
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    Pirates of the Caribbean: Glory of Piracy

    From the first film, Pirates of the Caribbean has basically focused on the inherent code of piracy. But there’s a moral dilemma here. Does it defend piracy? Does it deplore it? What message does it send to kids who watch the movie? In the end, are the British Royal Navy really the bad guys?

    • Swashbuckling and looting on the high seas have always captivated readers. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island told tales of seafaring outlaws that filled their days by having endless adventures. Their missions included visiting islands seeking riches, battling vicious savages and fighting the oppressive British Navy. The lifestyle of piracy was not entirely anarchistic because loyalty was carefully measured using laws; these supported by an honorable self-governed system. The pirate code of conduct was a way to punished captured enemies as well as providing a necessary social contract between the captain and his crew, an accord that if broken, resulted a stroll off the plank regardless of their rank. More importantly, why was this society revered or even respected by audiences? Is it the little guy taking on the big bad government? These were killers, rapists, etc. It seems odd that we vilify modern day Ethiopian pirates with machine guns yet Europeans are romanticized? Is only white piracy glorious? – Jason052714 1 day ago
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    • I believe in one sense the film also shows people's perception of what piracy was during the colonial era. For those who approach to write this particular topic, it would be essential to understand what were some of the circumstances that gave rise to piracy in this time period, and why people misunderstood pirates. – aferozan 24 hours ago
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    The "It's Complicated" Relationship of Deadpool and Spiderman

    There are always characters stories intersecting within the Marvel universe in print and on screen. This volatile dynamic is created when two or more superhero egos are positioned against one another. The result might be a tension that forms a bond or such irrevocable differences stage a violent confrontation. Occasionally, the latter changes when each character encounters a situation where the enemy of my enemy is my friend applies and they invariably join forces. The relationship between Deadpool and Spiderman is one example when a dialectal bond forms but not necessarily for the traditional reasons of completing a shared objective. Although this juxtaposition of good vs. evil or forming unlikely alliances is a commonplace plot convention, what makes the merger of Deadpool and Spiderman narrative so compelling?

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      Anime as an Art Form: Baccano!

      Part of a running series of examples of anime as an art form. Previous articles have established that anime has the ability to produce art; the question then becomes what sort of anime can be constituted as artistic. Baccano! is an artistic anime for a myriad of reasons. Its use of of neo-noir narrative techniques and editing helps build mystery while simultaneously creating a personality in the show that fits its title of "ruckus." Rather than creating confusion, it serves to weave its own meta-narrative of the events of a group of immortals over four major time periods. This becomes no small feat as almost two dozen characters are introduced in the show, often sharing time periods and plot-lines. Throughout all this, the editing serves to maintain control over the situation, dishing out information in small doses rather than large portions. This creates a sort of logic puzzle where the beginning and end of the narratives for the majority of the characters are known early on, and the remaining episodes are how the actions of the characters lead to their inevitable conclusions. Because of this, Baccano! succeeds in developing a narrative much to the effect of Guy Richie’s "Snatch" or Quentin Tarantino’s filmography.

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        Sasami-san@Ganbaranai: Religion, Tradition, and the New Age

        There’s this stereotype commonly associated with the teenager. They’re at this age where they become rambunctious and rebellious, and it becomes this struggle between parent and progeny characterized by whether or not the latter will be properly disciplined by the former before it’s too late for them to integrate in and contribute to society. Underlying the assumptions behind this stereotype is that the teenager is completely in the wrong. In response to this stereotype is another stereotypical conflict of the underdog teenager being oppressed by the authoritarian parent.

        Sasami Tsukuyomi is in her teenage rebellious streak as well, having rejected her mother’s expectations, run away from home, and becoming and becoming an otaku. Like perhaps many teenagers in the real world, Sasami is at the crossroads of adolescence, suspended between the world of past (embodied in Sasami’s mother) and present (lived through Sasami herself), trying to find a lifestyle that suits her temperament as a girl from a traditional family who has grown up in more liberating new age. Opposite of a functionalist scenario of the mother successfully reeling in the daughter, or the conflict scene of a daughter successfully rejecting the mother, is a negotiation between social obligation and individual freedom.

        Through its negotiation between the expectations of Sasami’s mother Sasami’s own experiences for a lifestyle, a set of values, and a (nevertheless Shinto influenced) spirituality that works for Sasami, Sasami-san@Ganbaranai is a show made for the traditionally raised Japanese youth of the new age.

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          Brevity is Power: Why Another Cour Won't Make It better

          From communities on MyAnimeList and Reddit to self-hosted blogs, anime viewers often turn to a number of stock phrases and judgements when ‘reviewing’ the shows they watch. It has too much ‘forced drama’. It’s too ‘edgy’. Or, perhaps most frequent of all, it should have had another cour.

          But when it comes to the desire for a show to have had its story stretched over twice as many episodes – to give the characters ‘more time to grow’, for instance (which implies that no movie character grows enough) – can we really argue that we would have enjoyed twice as much of a show that didn’t impress us with just one cour? And, alongside that, shouldn’t we rather be asking the show to be shorter, cutting out its unfulfilling content so that the story focuses on what the writer and studio have been competent with? Perhaps then we would end up with stories as cleverly paced as Eve no Jikan’s original ONA run (which kept viewers hooked within the massive gaps between the release of the show’s mostly smaller-than-average episodes), or comedies as instantly fulfilling as the currently-airing short Ojisan to Marshmallow.

          Drawing on a number of philosophies that clash with the thinking behind the ‘it should have been 24 episodes’ bandwagon, it becomes clear that asking for double the length – expecting a canvas twice the size to cater to the artist’s needs and treating a single cour as a canvas too small – is an escape from criticism, not an exercise in it.

          • I think this is an interesting topic, however one thing in which I strongly recommend are examples of series that support the information given here. – Kevin Mohammed 4 weeks ago
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          • I've given many examples; Eve no Jikan and Ojisan to Marshmallow are mentioned above and in the article, and also in the article are notes on the significance of Sword Art Online and Sushi Police. The article doesn't deeply analyse any of these shows as it aims to avoid concerning the discussion about one show and instead tries to keep it on the nature of criticising anime as a whole.The main issue is that we're dealing with hypotheticals, and it's hard to find an example of a desired second cour that doesn't actually exist. – JekoJeko 4 weeks ago
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          Film

          Poeticism in Cinema
          Poeticism in Cinema
          Star Wars, Nazis, and the Politics of Nonconformity in American Pop Culture
          DC v Marvel War: What is it Good For?
          Oscars 2016: Recent Trends

          TV

          The Walking Dead: Rick vs Deanna
          The Walking Dead: Rick vs Deanna
          Relationship Gender Roles in Sitcoms: For Better or For Worse?
          The Modern Freak Show
          The Keys to SuperWhoLock

          Animation

          Is the World Ready for an LGBTQ Disney Princess (or Prince)?
          Is the World Ready for an LGBTQ Disney Princess (or Prince)?
          Masculinity and the Disney Princess
          Understanding the Art of Stop Motion
          The Corpse Bride: The Beauty of The Dead

          Anime

          A Look at the 1980’s Anime OVA Legacy
          A Look at the 1980’s Anime OVA Legacy
          Slice of Life Anime: Insane Sanity
          No Game No Life: Post-Modern Detectives
          Ten Years of Kyoto Animation: Missed Tricks and Lasting Hits

          Manga

          The 5 Saddest Moments in One Piece
          The 5 Saddest Moments in One Piece
          Dragon Ball: Why is it Still Endearing to People Everywhere?
          Eyeshield 21: The Treatment of Opposing Teams
          14 Sai no Koi: The Manga Manual to Puberty

          Comics

          What Lost at Sea can Teach us About Anxiety and Depression
          What Lost at Sea can Teach us About Anxiety and Depression
          Kamala Khan: The new Ms. Marvel
          Deadpool: The Origin Story
          Using X-Men: Magneto Testament to Teach the Holocaust

          Literature

          Heart of Darkness: The Two-Sided Mask of Kurtz
          Heart of Darkness: The Two-Sided Mask of Kurtz
          Poetry and the Great War Soldiers: Necessity of Emotion
          The Origins of Middle-Earth: Gods, Poems, and Dragons
          Influence of the I-Novel (私小説) on Makoto Shinkai’s Films

          Arts

          Folk Music: A Timeless Genre
          Folk Music: A Timeless Genre
          The Feminist Makeup Culture: Reconsidering Cosmetics
          Shock Art: The Name Says It All
          Spotlight on Lauren Kalman: Pleasure and Pain In Gold

          Writing

          The Act of Writing: A Semantic Exploration
          The Act of Writing: A Semantic Exploration
          The Modern Translation of Writing
          Fanficton: A Practice in the Art of Storytelling
          Attention Writers: The Myth of Writer’s Block