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Latest Topics

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Positive representation in the media for women, specifically within the web videos medium

Women in the media tend to get a negative stigma against them and that needs to change.

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    From Manuscript to Screen: The Involvement of an Author in the writing of a book's Screenplay

    Consider an author’s roll in the writing of the screenplay if his novel is offered a film deal. Should the author be the main screenwriter? Should he be involved at all? Not everything in a book translates well to screen (which explains material that is only in the film & not the book). Not all authors are meant to be screenwriters (and not all screenwriters should be authors). So: do we segregate the two, or can they play nicely together?

    • I think the Harry Potter movies are a testament to authors and screenwriters working well together. J.K Rowling did not dominate decisions for the movies but she had great influence and insight, I've read that she greatly helped actors fill their role better by being there to give them deeper insight and background into the character. The actor of Snape knew his entire backstory long before anyone else because Rowling let him in on the secrets. The author should at least be well informed if the adaptations want to stick true to the books so they don't do anything that would contradict what might happen later in an unpublished series' next book. That being said it's okay to continue without author's influence if the adaptation makes clear to fans that it is blatantly deviating from the books such as with Game of Thrones now that it's caught up with the books and wants to continue production on their own terms, and spin offs like Full Metal Alchemist which animated itself before the manga concluded which led to drastically different endings (noticeable to those who didn't read the manga because the series was re-animated in FMA Brotherhood which stuck to the manga once it was done). – Slaidey 2 days ago
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    Could Black Widow Have Her Own Movie

    Everyone loves Black Widow in the cinematic universe, not just because she is sexy and bad ass, but also because her character in more normal when compared to the other members to the Avengers. So could she handle a whole movie, sourly dedicated to her. On one hand, It would be interesting to see where the Marvel Cinematic Universe would take a spy/superhero film. On the other hand, it is not interlay necessary considering we already know so much about her already.

    • I think it might be a stretch for her to have her own movie, but I could see her playing an integral role in say a Hulk film. This would kind of make sense seeing as a romance was "teased" in Age of Ultron between Widow and Banner. Widow would definitely not be the conventional love interest and to an extent she could even be the main character of the film. The film could even continue with Disney/fairy tale links and use themes from Beauty and the Beast. – Jamie 2 months ago
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    • Another topic to explore for a movie featuring Black Widow would be financial support for a female lead in a superhero film. Who would produce and back this project? This article could look at females who are in the minority when it comes to lead roles, directors and writers in mainstream media; especially in action hero themes. I though would support Black Widow in her own movie as a fan. – Venus Echos 2 months ago
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    • In the MCU, we actually know very little about Natasha, except what she tells us in movies where she is undercover or otherwise covering for herself (the exception is the fragmented scenes we see in Age of Ultron, and the events Loki mentions in the first Avengers film).By the end of Captain America 2, however, Natasha willfully disseminates every part of her history she's ever had to keep secret in order to save the world. For a character whose trade is secrets, that is a huge emotional development, and ripe for a continuation in her own movie.In any case, it seems nonsensical to me that she would be denied a film on account of familiarity, when Spider-Man will have no less than three separate origin movies by the end of the decade. Black Widow has had solo runs of comics for decades now, including the excellent spy thriller Name of the Rose by Marjorie Liu, and can surely take on a movie of her own. – bouzingo 2 months ago
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    • Natasha's rogues gallery is a touch on the light side. That's not to say she couldn't borrow them from somebody else obviously, just that it probably doesn't help her odds of getting a film. – Winter 11 hours ago
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    The most accurate portrayal of loneliness and isolation in film

    It is difficult to narrow it down to one, but Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation feels like an extremely accurate exploration into the themes of loneliness, reticence and human detachment. Other contenders would be Buffalo ’66, Detachment and Close-Up, all favourite films of mine, too.

    Also, a film I recently saw, the Danish film Blind. About a woman who has recently lost her sight and retreats into the safety of her home and imagination. The film is more about loneliness and writing than blindness which is superbly realised by the director.

    • Possibly the topic could be made into a list since it is difficult to narrow down. – Jordan 1 day ago
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    • The title is too vague in terms of a possible objective with "loneliness/isolation" and since five different films are also mentioned and speculated over within the description, it would definitely be more appropriate for this topic to be centered around a list of some sort. – dsoumilas 1 day ago
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    • Agree with what's been said. A list of "10 great films about loneliness" or some such could be interesting though. – Winter 11 hours ago
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    Young Adult Novels that are taken seriously

    I know a lot of teen fiction gets a bad reputation for being sappy and cliched. It’s easy to forget the struggle of growing up and the pettiness of high school. There is something magical about reading about a first kiss or a teen getting their first taste of the real world. The Uglies trilogy by Scott Westerfeld had a profound effect on me even to this day, from when I first read the books at age 15. The main character, tally, was constantly doing the wrong thing for the right reasons and she struggled with maturity and beauty in a dystopian landscape that is not too different from our own. I would like to see an article about different Young Adult novels that are still well-respected literature.

    • Good topic! I think that your topic can be broken down even further to discuss the motif of growing up/maturing but also how this is done. Post apocalyptic, dystopian, agrarian...all of them have shown themselves in YA literature. I think this would be a really interesting article to read – DClarke 3 days ago
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    • This will be a great topic! You could provide a selection of YA novels that are considered "well-respected literature." You can even provide a few examples and critically analyze them, proving that YA novels are not always, in your words, sappy and cliche. After all, some YA novels are taught in classrooms and you can discuss what YA novels are taught in classrooms and why. For example, Monster by Walter Dean Myers and The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian are taught in classrooms and introduce students to themes such as identity and encourage them to read diversely. – Amanda Dominguez-Chio 2 days ago
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    • If you need more examples of novels that are being studied in high school, I remember reading 'Catcher in the Rye', 'Haroun and the Sea of Stories', 'The Kite Runner' and 'Looking for Alaska'. – YsabelGo 22 hours ago
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    Actors Changing Characters

    I recently read an interview with Stephen Falk commenting about the second season of You’re The Worst and he commented that Chris Geere’s character of Jimmy was not intended to be British but the character was specifically altered after seeing his Audition. This surprised me as a Brit because a lot of Jimmy’s humour is so quintessentially British that I thought his character would have had that running through all of the early scripts. So an interesting article could be how much a certain actor can influence changes in their character, a few more examples springing to mind are Morgan Freeman in Shawshank and Mackenzie Crook in The Office. Could be Film or TV.

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      How to watch films critically?

      I was walking out of a cinema last winter when I couldn’t help overhear a woman talking about the film – in a most insightful way; in terms I never thought of. I wished I asked her for reading recommendations. I continue to wonder how one can view a film beyond just one’s subjective experience of it. What would be the basic terms that would direct critical thinking about a film? How can I see for example the new Mad Max movie as a fragment of its Avant Garde-like original with its thundering base from the engines creating a new ground that the current one is totally devoid of? Or the lack of depth, in comparison?

      • A good focus would be forming a template for basic storytelling. Some flexibility must be allowed for interpreting art of course. – Joseph Manduke IV 2 months ago
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      • People think that simply finding flaws in a film officially makes them a critic, when really it is more complicated than that. It is not only important to understand why a film does not work, but also what makes a good film work so well? When you understand good character development and good storytelling is a well made film, the better you will be at understanding why a bad will does not work – Aaron Hatch 2 months ago
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      • The best way to write this topic will be by listing down the features that critics look out for in films and then explaining them one by one. – dhananandini 2 months ago
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      • I just took a music and film course in school and it totally changed the way I watch movies. Often the sounds we hear fade into the background of our consciousness. We can't necessarily pick out what music is playing, but it helps without fail to make us feel. They aren't sound clips chosen at random; the director and a whole team of people work to compose and compile every sound recorded to contribute toward the final product. – Nicola 2 months ago
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      • In any type of artwork, a film, a musical piece - a narrative, the artist is trying to lead the reader through their piece to get them to see something, hear something, feel something, etc. depending on the art form. Although this is the ideal framework in which to interpret, it is not often one we can know or ascertain. – kathleensumpton 3 days ago
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      • Thinking critically about a film--or about anything, really--is simply not taking everything at face value. Sometimes it can be useful to look at the narrative of a film through different theoretical angles: political, economic, racial, gender and feminist, historical, social, etc. The list is almost endless. You bring up the example of Mad Max--one way to think critically about this film is how women and femininity (and sexuality) are represented in what is clearly a very patriarchal universe. A good place to start is with your subjective experience, with those gut reactions, then it's a matter of being mindful of those reactions and take a few steps back in order to analyze them more objectively. – Rachel Watson 2 days ago
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      Religion in Video Games

      Many video games with their own universes create a religion to follow it. It is tough to create a religion that seems both believable and also seems like something that people would purposely devote themselves to. Lots of these religions (like in Dead Space or Resident Evil 4) are cults but occasionally there are religions that mirror real life faiths to such a degree that they almost seem believable in their own world’s mythos. Religions like the Chantry in Dragon Age or the comicly overdone Epsilon Program of GTA V feel believable in their world because they represent a lot of things that people believe in within that world. I personally don’t know much about religion in the real world so I don’t feel qualified enough to really write about this but it could be an interesting topic to write on.

      • Religion is also a major theme in the Legend of Zelda series and at this point is pretty much accepted by fact as all the characters. It is also constantly evolving and plays a more and more major role with each console game. It would be interesting to compare this to how religions operate in the real world (which is often very static) – Grace Maich 2 months ago
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      • Assassin's Creed would be a great example here. – Joseph Manduke IV 2 months ago
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      • I know Final Fantasy XIII is not that popular, but the storyline has a lot of against gods and fate. – Jill 2 months ago
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      • Final Fantasy ten would be a great case here and specifically looking at Seymour and the conflict with Sin. Organized religion is usually made to be either a main villain, or some type of sub villain. This topic would be fairly broad though. Maybe focus on either spectrum? The representation of religion in video games as evil or good? Maybe ask questions as to why this might be the case. – Xemnas 2 months ago
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      Film

      Film vs. Theatre: Engaging Young People in Off-Screen Drama
      Film vs. Theatre: Engaging Young People in Off-Screen Drama
      The Social Relevancy and Enigmatic Messages of “Gilda”
      Back to The Future: The Function of Supporting Characters
      The End of The Tour: The Loneliness of the Long-Form Writer

      TV

      Firefly: A Freudian and Jungian Analysis
      Firefly: A Freudian and Jungian Analysis
      Game of Thrones: Don’t Judge a Boob by its Cover
      Sexual Assault in HBO’s Game of Thrones
      Spoiler Alert! The Science of How Spoilers Can Ruin TV

      Animation

      Five Animated Musicals That Are Not Disney
      Five Animated Musicals That Are Not Disney
      Feminism and the Disney Princesses
      The “Just for Kids” Excuse: Analyzing Animation in Modern Entertainment
      The History Behind Disney Princesses

      Anime

      How Takeo Broke the Mold in Ore Monogatari!!
      How Takeo Broke the Mold in Ore Monogatari!!
      Hatsune Miku: How a Virtual Idol Inspired Creativity
      Perceptions of Maturity in Anime
      Full Metal Alchemist: Science vs Religion

      Manga

      14 Sai no Koi: The Manga Manual to Puberty
      14 Sai no Koi: The Manga Manual to Puberty
      Love in Masashi Kishimoto’s Naruto
      Cyborg 009: The Long Road to an Ending
      Trauma and its Representation in Manga

      Comics

      Superheroes: Are They Really Heroes?
      Superheroes: Are They Really Heroes?
      Frank Miller’s Return To Batman Comics
      Batman and Bruce: Superheroes and Identity
      Batman and Superman: Comparing Two Iconic Superheroes

      Literature

      Lovecraft: Why His Ideas Survive
      Lovecraft: Why His Ideas Survive
      What Does it Mean to Be a Literary Artist?
      Analyzing Jane Eyre as a Contemporary “Bad Feminist”
      Why We Need Mina-Centric Dracula

      Arts

      Banksy: The Elusive Street Graffiti Artist
      Banksy: The Elusive Street Graffiti Artist
      Alfred Stieglitz: Meet the Artist Who Popularized Photography in America
      Christopher Lee: The Legacy of a Fascinating Man
      Ballet as a Progressive Art: Expectations and Perceptions

      Writing

      Attention Writers: The Myth of Writer’s Block
      Attention Writers: The Myth of Writer’s Block
      Working with The Shadow: A Writer’s Guide
      Critical Judgement: A Personal Perspective
      Writing: The Real Reason You Procrastinate