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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016); Captain America: Civil War (2016)
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The eight 2016 Oscar nominees for Best Picture.
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All that glisters is not gold - Shakespeare
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Loki avengers
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Jean Cocteau Orpheus Criterion Collection
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Jurassic World Park
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Film and Video Games: The Adaptation Dilemma

With so many video game franchises scheduled to be turned into major motion picture films over the next couple years, explore the brief history of the video game film adaptation. Take a closer look as to why these types of adaptations haven’t been very successful, answer some of the tough questions like: can a video game to movie adaptation actually work properly? Do the two mediums have enough in common that lend themselves to adaptation? Can upcoming films like Ratchet and Clank, Uncharted, The Last of Us etc. change the trend moving forward? What are the differences of these two mediums?

  • I think it almost goes without saying that Tomb Raider should be looked at with this article and how the films potentially hurt the games coming after that until the reboot in 2013. Wreck it Ralph though would be a good example of how to do the adaptation well, using familiar game characters, but not as the primary protagonists/antagonists. The writer could look at toys, board games, card games that have received movies off the back of their success; I'm thinking of Bionicle, The Lego Movie and even Battleships. It may also be worth looking the other way as well. Film/TV to video games like South Park: The Stick of Truth. – Jamie 8 months ago
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  • I know many people in the gaming community who liked Tomb Raider. Angelina was a perfect actress to play the first version of ladies cost. The action could have been better but it wad much better then let's say the Super Mario brothers movie.I think with games having more narration to them adaptation will be easier to do. Perhaps the issue is that Hollywood feels that they do not need to pour as much work into the films because they already have a fan base. This may be true of books but games are different and not every liberty can be taken with then add Hollywood has done... "Battleship" – fchery 8 months ago
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  • The biggest challenge is the films give narrative control to the film makers. Games give some or all of it to the audience. If you're watching a film in the theaters, you can't control the cinemotography (space/position) and you can't control the editing (time/pacing). In games, though that's often not the case, usually you have some say over how long the game will be played, how it will be played, whether you want to finish it. Moreover, since designers for many reasons can't anticipate all your actions, they often leave a lot of the character work to you. Did you like FFVII in spite of or because of the blocky figures, which forced you to project all sorts of qualities onto Cloud, Aerith, etc? Remember what happened to Nintendo when it tried to give Samus a lengthier back story in Other M? A game like The Last of Us, might work on film, because the game monopolizes most of the story and character development. Indeed, that might be why adaptations of more recent games will do better than earlier ones because in many cases the player has less discretion over how to interpret the story. That is to say, since so many games try to be "cinematic", adapting them should be easier than prior efforts. – rj2n 8 months ago
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  • I completely agree with rj2n. For example, also, how will they create Portal? They are going to make it into a film. The fun of the game was figuring things out as the player and using your own skills and thought process to finish the game. Is an audience just going to sit there and watch? – Jaye Freeland 1 day ago
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What makes a scary movie...scary?

Examine the elements of horror movies that are generally considered the most effective at scaring, disturbing, or unsettling audiences, and how these have changed over the decades, from early silent films to Hitchcock’s masterpieces to modern remakes.

  • One direction this article could go could be to make a list of the recurring motifs in horror film according to film theorist Robin Wood, which are Psychos, Nature, Satanism and possession, the Terrible Child, and Cannibalism. It could also explore the idea of repression and the Other in film, not to mention the idea of horror originating from something totally normal being scarier than horror originating from the outside world. – VelvetRose 6 months ago
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  • What's interesting to note here is the mood and setting when sitting down to watch a horror film. The setting created by the atmosphere of the movie and the music's score help turn things which would normally not be scary for some, and makes them terrifying. Example, I am not scared of clowns but you be darn sure I freaked while watching IT for the first time. – cdenomme96 6 months ago
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Audience for world cinema in the 21st century

It would seem the majority of casual film-goers have no time, or interest, in films from overseas. Has this always been the case, or is such neglect for foreign cinema a new development? With the rapidly growing popularity of reality TV shows, along with social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, is the attention required to sit through a subtitled film merely regarded as a waste of time and effort by the average citizen? Any thoughts?

  • This has always been a problem, though things have actually improved in terms of acknowledging foreign films. Critically at least. The general public doesn't have much interest. This may be due to a very centralized view of the world in general. – Joseph Manduke IV 5 months ago
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  • You could also argue that with the rise of technology, the access to foreign films is made easier. The critics and festivals make a point to discover, distribute and showcase foreign films as part of a more 'globalized' world. And when they get critically acclaimed in prestigious festivals like Cannes or at the Academy Awards, the general public follows since it has been 'recognized' by big (mainstream?) institutions. – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 5 months ago
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  • I love world cinema and music. Recently I watched "Winter Under Fire" about Ukranian politics. Hoping to see "A Tale of Love and Darkness" because Natalie Portman is a great international actress.That is why I think marketing to the West is a major problem in getting to see movies in languages other than English. Netflix and Youtube do a great job of making movies accessible and Netflix will recommend one foreign film if you watch a few which leads to some pleasant surprises. As Rachel said, tech helps.But for most people I think if international productions houses were able to advertise easily in the West that would make a difference, international awards shows help and also awards in Hollywood could help, if inclined to do so.I think you are right though because even for a world cinema fan like me, it does involve some effort. But since I am addicted, I do it. That is one thing to watch out for is that once you get into it, it's too engrossing. I loved the Japanese comedy "Shall We Dance" in 1996 and am still going strong.Munjeera – Munjeera 4 days ago
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Memoir to Wes Craven

On August 30 2015, Wes Craven passed away. He was known for slasher films, in particular, A Nightmare on Elm Street. This article will go in-depth about Wes Craven’s contribution to the horror genre, and be an informative article about this film director.

  • Minor note but "Nightmare of Elm street" should've been "A Nightmare on Elm Street," as far as the title of that film goes. In any case though, another film that needs to been mentioned in an article about Wes Craven is The Last House on the Left (1972) because that was his first film and it was followed by so much controversy over both its advertising (i.e. the tagline "it is only a movie, only a movie...") and its then controversial subject matter of graphic rape and revenge. – dsoumilas 5 months ago
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What would have happened if Tom Holland wasn't picked to play Spider Man?

There were lots of extremely good choices for the next Spider Man character. It was highly projected at one time that Asa Butterfield would land the role, but by June, Butterfield was out. There were several other choices as well, and Marvel and Sony both spent an entire year searching. Holland has characteristics that overqualify him, such as his ability to dance and do his own stunts, especially flips. But what were to happen if someone else was chosen? How would they rank against Tom, and each other? If Tom wasn’t a good choice, who should they have chosen? Spider Man, according to Marvel.com, is "the most successful franchise in the history of Sony Pictures, with the five films having taken in more than $4 billion worldwide," after all. Did they pass off the role to the right person?

  • It would be a little odd and wrong to judge actors against Holland without the film actually being released yet. Perhaps instead of comparing to Holland you could inclue him in the discussion into what would make him a good Spider-Man as well as the "what ifs". Other than holland and Butterfield I didn't really know which actors were up for consideration so maybe as well as discussing the actors you could talk about the different people who have taken on the persona of Spider-Man: obviously Peter Parker and Myles Morales but maybe also an older Parker or a new character altogether. – Jamie White 4 months ago
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  • It's a marvel film, I don't think it really matters. They could used a chimpanzee, call him Banana Parker and fans will still love it – Lazarinth 4 months ago
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The conditions for watching films: the importance of the big screen

This is a hard topic to write about so the article will probably have to be personal yet rely on statistics, investigations and numbers as well. The conditions of how we watch a film are extremely important as they influence our reception, understanding and appreciation of the film. Watching a classic like The Usual Suspects on a small screen is never as satisfying as watching it on a big screen. Yet classics are very rarely projected again on big screens. In Paris, a cinema has just opened, specializing in projecting Hollywood and French classics on a big screen once again for the public. How much are screen size and ratio important in our experience of the film? How can you read a film through the cinema experience and through the home experience? How aware are the distributors on this subject and how does it influence their decision? In contrast, can we appreciate a film more at home, in the comfort of our personal space? How does our experience change if we watch it on TV? On a laptop?

  • I think it changes in that when we goto a theater, we are going out of our way for that experience. The theater is exclusively a place for films to be watched, the home is not so. Our attention is easily diverted and in all likelihood not as audio/visually potent as the theater system. The common moviegoer will always deny caring about film vs digital, big screen vs little, high quality sound vs low, or anything else in regard to the film's aesthetic. The thing is that those things make an effect whether or not you realize they are or not. You know something about to come crashing through this door, but why did you know? Because Tarantino Dollied in on the door. This scene feels warm and romantic, but why? Because of the delicate lighting. These things will always make a difference, even to those people who deny their importance. – AaronHunt 5 months ago
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  • I've always found a horror to be more frightening in a cinema, a comedy to be more hilarious, and an action sequence to move me closer to the edge of my seat. There's something to be said for group-think, shared emotions in space, and the ability of a theater-goer to feed on the thoughts and emotional reactions of others.Also, my living room can never get as delectably dark as a movie theater. That's important in my book. – Derek Jackson 5 months ago
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  • I think the question of medium specificity is often overlooked. This question looks like a great jumping point for a discussion about the sensual or material qualities of cinema. Thank you for sharing. – InAugust 5 months ago
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The role of the male protagonist in Hitchcock cinema.

In Alfred Hitchcock’s films produced in the 1930s, the master director/producer develops his protagonist in each film following a generally prescriptive pattern of having the leading man stumble or fall (intentionally or not) into conspiracy, controversy, and calamity. Then, the hero must struggle to redeem himself, usually with the assistance (invited or not) by the leading female. How do these film plots portray and challenge ideals of modernism?

    Taken by Munjeera (PM) 4 days ago.
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    The Rise of Netflix in College Students

    I know from experience that Netflix is very popular among college students as a form of amusement and stress-relieving. I think this might be an interesting topic to talk about how it might be affecting their education and/or social experiences at college. Is this a problem? or does it have the capability to eventually become a problem?

    • Can Netflix lead to procrastination when in college? Sure, but so will a million other things like playing video games, hanging with friends, and watch sports. Netflix is hardly a bad thing because college students need a break from all the studying and writing they have to do. But like anything that is fun, it can soon become addicting. – Aaron Hatch 4 months ago
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    • Perhaps Netflix isn't necessarily bad for success in college, but maybe there's a factor that separates these two: health. Too much of a good thing sometimes is bad for our bodies. Does Netflix binging have any effect or relationship to physical, mental, social, etc. health? And how does THAT affect one's college experience? It's really interesting how popular of an outlet this is for students to spend free time nowadays. – James Smith 4 months ago
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    • Procrastination occurs in all college students. I'm supposed to be writing an English paper right now. – AlyssaMariano 4 months ago
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    • I find that having Netflix on while I do my work actually reduces the likelihood of me procrastinating because I won't feel like all I'm doing is work. It tricks the mind. However, there is an additional likelihood that it detracts from the typical idea of social experiences. More often than not people are talking about Netflix and chill rather than hooking up at a party, and if you are bored with friends you can turn on a show or movie and distract yourself. – Catherine Conte 4 months ago
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    • I think Netflix becomes a problem when you let it become one. If one knows how to successfully manage their time between studying and Netflix, there really shouldn't be a problem. I think it really just depends on the kind of student you are. – iamclystanieves 4 months ago
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    • I'll admit that I have the urge to visit Netflix every now and then, especially when I should be reading for classes. However, since I'm an English major aspiring to become a film critic, I often find that some Netflix viewing enriches my life as a student. I'm pretty selective about what I watch, and the films/TV shows I watch offer new perspectives on certain topics I study in my English classes. Everyone always says that a little bit of reading goes a long way, but I think a lot of people underestimate how film can be just as beneficial as reading, if not more so. – Ben Bouffard 5 days ago
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    Japanese Horror: What to Watch Next

    After watching Ring and The Grudge, some horror fans can be at a loss of where to go next. Here is an eclectic mix of J-Horror for you to try out next.

    Audition, 1999, Dir. Takashi Miike
    A lonely widower holds an audition in order to find a girlfriend. Unfortunately for him, the woman he selects has some dark secrets that destroy their relationship and even his life.

    Battle Royale, 2000, Dir. Kinji Fukasaku
    A class of delinquents is stranded on an island, forced to kill each other over the next three days. If there isn’t one person left at the end of those three days, everyone dies. Hell breaks loose, with friendships and rivalries being taken to whole new levels.

    Dark Water, 2002, Dir. Hideo Nakata
    A recently divorced mother moves into a run-down apartment building with her daughter. The constant presence of a mysterious handbag, dripping water, and strange appearances of a dead girl threaten the mother’s sanity.

    Hausu, 1977, Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi
    Six girls travel to one of their aunt’s house for vacation. But after decades of living alone, is the aunt still the same woman she was?

    Ichi the Killer, 2001, Dir. Takashi Miike
    Depraved hitman Kakihara is out for revenge when his gang’s boss is taken out by a mysterious assassin. What follows is a blend of dark humor and disturbingly graphic imagery.

    • I'm not sure if you would call Battle Royale a horror, but it did have its gruesome moments. I can't believe I was able to watch that on my own! – YsabelGo 3 months ago
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    • I thought I left a comment but maybe it didn't go through. If you're talking about great horrors and you include Hausu and Onibaba, I feel there is a need for Jigoku and Kwaiden. Otherwise, solid list of the Japanese horror notables. – Connor 3 months ago
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    • I've never experienced Japanese horror. It sounds interesting! – trapgrandma 3 months ago
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    • I'm afraid of scary things. They didn't actually used to bother me. I can pinpoint the EXACT movie that ended my scary movie watching. The Ring hahaha. Never been the same. I had to have my parents remove my TV from my room so I could sleep. So I'm sorry to say, that even though a lot of these sound super interesting, I'm going to stick to the ones clearly marked as "more suspense than horror." Haha. – Tatijana 3 months ago
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    • Great list! I'll be sure to check these out. – Emily Deibler 2 months ago
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    • Japanese are the best at horror! – crolins 2 months ago
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    • Japanese are the best at horror! – crolins 2 months ago
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    • You always gotta love a brilliant Japanese horror! – Kevin Mohammed 1 month ago
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