Film

Latest Articles

Film
40
Film
26
Film
30
Film
31
Film
57
Film
62
Film
48
Marvel Superheroes and Villains
Film
45
Film
52
Film
45

Latest Topics

5

The Use of Music in Baby Driver

Analyze the use of music in the film. The music Baby listens to becomes a major part of the movie’s score and also serves to punctuate many of the film’s amazing chase sequences; it is often synced perfectly to the action, as Baby is meticulous in timing the music just right. A film’s score is always deliberately attuned to the story’s plot and themes, but do the musical choices, timing, and the fact it is usually coming from a character’s iPod produce a new or different effect upon the viewer?

  • I have yet to see baby driver but I hugely appreciate a good soundtrack in a movie so this topic would be great to explore the importance of music in film and how it can at times be equally as effective as special effects and dialogue. The Dark Knight trilogy is a great example of this as I believe Hans Zimmer's composure on that made it all the more amazing. – AdilYoosuf 1 month ago
    4
  • It would be helpful to add a track-listing for the Baby Driver soundtrack, and possibly a link to its iTunes page so readers can have a place to sample songs track by track in case they forget a song. – TeriekWilliams1988 1 month ago
    2
  • I recently watched a clip from an interview where the actors talked about the fact that music was a big part of this film already in the scripting phase. They even wrote a special program to help readers experience the story and the music together while they were shopping it around. https://youtu.be/RB7E0geIeV8 – derBruderspielt 1 month ago
    1
  • There are various very useful video essays on this topic on YouTube, typing Baby Driver essay on it should find some. – Henry 5 days ago
    0
5

The differences between the DC and Marvel cinematic Universes and why we care so much

Since the two companies became huge competitors in the comic book industry, DC and Marvel have split fandoms and caused many heated debates among their followings. Why is this? Why do people swear that Zach Snyder films are terrible and say Superman is a boring character, and than praise the Marvel movies? Are there biases involved? Do DC movies simply not put enough jokes in them? Why all the hate? And is there any hope that it will be acceptable to enjoy DC movies as well as marvel movies? I would like the person who picks this topic up to discover first the differences between these two franchises, and then talk about how these differences play out into the Cinematic Universes.

  • You wrote: "Do DC movies simply not put enough jokes in them?" Maybe it's not just the presence/absence of jokes but rather the type of humor used? For me, there's definitely a streak of camp and self-awareness in many of the Marvel movies that is not present in the DC movies. – JamesBKelley 1 month ago
    0
7
Locked

Dark, Light, and Color in Tim Burton's films

An examination of how color, light, and dark have been used in Tim Burton’s films to reflect the view points of his characters and the observance of the mundane vs the outrageous. Specifically looking at how Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children differs from many of of Tim Burton’s other films by providing more "grey" spaces that are neither colorful "dream worlds" nor colorless "realities". It would also be interesting to include an analysis of the film Edward Scissorhands and how the "normal"/suburban world is portrayed as the "dream world" through color reflecting Edwards viewpoint.

  • May I suggest adding Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to the article? Not only is the film bursting with color, it's simultaneously similar and different in theme to the other two. You could do the same with Alice in Wonderland. – Stephanie M. 1 month ago
    4
Taken by IAmToast (PM) 1 month ago.
5
Locked

The Effects of Iconic Roles on an Actor and His/Her Career

Most actors play a plethora of roles in film and on television shows. Some actors though, are best remembered for one or two iconic roles, even after the film has been out for years or the show gets cancelled. Examples include Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, best known for their portrayal of Michelle Tanner, Jaleel White (Steve Urkel), and Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter). More examples: Juliette Binoche (Vianne Rochet, Chocolat), Julie Andrews (Maria Rainer, Mary Poppins), and Leonardo DiCaprio (Jack Dawson).

Does being associated with an iconic role help or hurt an actor’s career? Does it make a difference whether the actor was a child or adult at the time of the role (s) in question? Do viewers prefer that actors stay in iconic role "molds," or would they rather actors create new characters/avoid typecasting? Explore these and other questions, as well as any examples you might choose, to determine the positive and negative aspects of associating actors with very specific roles.

  • The best actors would tend to belittle any type of impact, I would say. Take my childhood idol Clint Eastwood: traded his spurs for a holster, plays good guy or bad guy with equal tact; and still going strong in politics of all things--makes it seem as just matter of dusting off the layers of script material and moving on to the next being thing (nothing to it). Not convinced? Then, there is Arnold Schwarzenegger: Mr. Universe, Mr. Titanium, and Mr. Dream Teacher; still turning heads in politics. Positive and negative in Hollywood, not these guys. – LFreire 2 months ago
    3
  • Yet another interesting topic suggestion from Stephanie. I suppose there are examples of iconic roles that have helped an actor's career and others that have hurt a career. Off the top of my head I could mention just how long Sean Connery took to shake off the '007' tag, as some people actually confused the actor with the role, but he has gone on to more interesting roles, even if he did revisit Bond in 'Never Say Never Again' (1983). Conversely there's the controversial 'unsimulated sex act' that Chloë Sevigny performed in 'The Brown Bunny' (2003), which she will no doubt be forever remembered for and appears to have damaged her standing as a serious actress. Remaining in an iconic role certainly helps with the bank balance, but doesn't stretch an actor in any way - the actor Adam Woodyatt, who plays the character, Ian Beale in the long running British soap 'Eastenders', lives a few miles away from me and is often seen around in his Maserati (No, I'm not envious!...Well, maybe a little). The locals all refer to him by his on-screen character name. However, for me, the best example of someone who has never let the grass grow under his feet is Sir Patrick Stewart - perhaps best known for Captain Jean-Luc Picard in 'Star Trek: The Next Generation', who has since returned to his Shakespearean roots with vigour as well as delivering one the best performances as Ebenezer Scrooge in the 1999 version of 'A Christmas Carol'. – Amyus 1 month ago
    2
  • I think being strongly associated with a role is probably harmful for an actor in terms of their future career prospects. It's difficult to be type-cast and if an actor is type-cast than I suspect it would be very displeasing for them to have to struggle to break into new roles and in new genres. That being said socially it's probably neat for them to be strongly associated with a type of character or genre which would be cool if it didn't also impact what casting agents and directors think of them. – LucianoTheWriter 1 month ago
    1
Taken by LucianoTheWriter (PM) 1 month ago.
5

Teen Films as Sexual education

This article could asses the ways teen films inform, it’s primarly teenage audience, about the social and emotional ways of dealing with sex. Given this is never addressed in the clinical and scientific approach schools take towards sexual education, its reasonable to assume that most people would understand the other elements of sexual education through alternative mediums. Teen films are a great example as they often focus around the sex quest for boys i.e. Superbad, the Inbetweeners movie, Sex Drive, American Pie etc. Its could be said these films often create a gender disparity in dealing with sex as there is barely any female representation aside from the, older and sexually intimidating character

  • This is an interesting topic as it would be worth looking at the impact also of the genre of the film on the presentation of sex in such films. For instance the role in comedy is often to amuse and this can be used to soften the awkwardness of such sexual encounters and exploration. However, some of this does also normalise and champion the pursuit of sex as a rite of passage, which can send a negative portrayal of sex. The presence of sex in horror films is perhaps one of the most disturbing as often there are undertones of rape, force and abuse, 'Cherry Falls' is a concerning one. Then the issue of teen romance films can both have a positive and negative portrayal of sexual relations, 'Girl Next Door' and '100 Girls' are two interesting and frank films that deal with unusual portrayals of the emotional connection related to sex. I think this could be an intriguing topic to discuss. – SaraiMW 2 months ago
    2
  • I would add that there could also be strong critique involved. The teen dramas also facilitate an idealization of sexual engagement and often promote problematic images of women. – Jonathan Judd 2 months ago
    3
  • YES! I'd be interested to know how newer films tackle this idea, too. – Emily Esten 2 months ago
    2
9

The biblical allegory within Darren Aronofkys Mother

Mother is a film which has received rather controversial critical reception for its gratuitous brutality and extremely intricate plot line. Perhaps what is overlooked however, is the overall premise of the film being a biblical allusion and social commentary- particularly in an environmental sense. An article going into the depth of this using examples of the film and Aronofskys directing will be quite engaging.

  • an interesting topic to look into! however, the director and the actors in the film have all come out saying that instead of being a biblical allegory, Mother! is an environmental horror film, with both the female lead and the house itself representing nature and "mother earth" – ees 2 months ago
    6
5

Why "Hocus Pocus" Continues Putting a Spell on Us

Halloween will soon be upon us and with it, classic Halloween films. Ask anyone who grew up in the 1990s or early 2000s what their first or favorite Halloween films were, and Hocus Pocus will probably top the list. With three incredible lead actresses (Bette Middler, Kathy Najimy, and Sarah Jessica Parker), quotable lines, and bewitching songs, the film will probably endure much longer than the Sanderson sisters.

This said, many critics feel Hocus Pocus is overrated and too campy. It’s not necessarily scary, unless you’re around little Dani’s age (played by Thora Birch). Many critics are unsure why a Disney movie aimed at kids and tweens talks so much about virginity and sex. Others claim that though they try, the Sanderson sisters just aren’t that funny.

So what’s the truth behind Hocus Pocus? What makes it good? If the elements listed above are not done well, what is (or is the film scarier, funnier, or smarter than we give it credit for)? Did the three lead actresses give their best or sell themselves short/"phone it in?" Discuss.

  • I've always been mystified by the popularity of this film. A critical discussion about its craft and elements would be very interesting. Perhaps, this exploration could increase my appreciation of this quirky romp. – L Squared 2 months ago
    4
  • I watched it last year to see what all the fuss was about (saw it as a kid, but in an elementary cafeteria with poor acoustics, so I didn't hear/understand a thing). IMHO, some parts are good but it's not the A+ film a lot of people seem to think it is. I'd argue that with films like this, the nostalgia filter blinds viewers to certain flaws. Of course, that could be good or bad. – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
    5
  • Definitely need to address nostalgia goggles and how the new generations react to this without that previous experience. – AGMacdonald 2 months ago
    4
6
Locked

Efficacy of the Bechdel Test

A work of fiction is considered to have passed the Bechdel test if it features two women who talk about something other than a man. In many cases, it also requires that the women have names. Nearly half of films meet this requirement. Does this test truly examine the portrayal of gender in media?

  • Maybe an additional question you could also ask is, what kind of insight does applying the Bechdel Test on films give us about particular filmmakers (and give some examples) and has the introduction of the Bechdel Test changed the industry at all? – Kevin 1 year ago
    2
  • I think another important question might be, does a film that fails the Bechdel Test always portray gender negatively? Does a film that passes the Bechdel Test always portray gender positively?If not, what does the Bechdel Test truly show us? – C8lin 1 year ago
    2
  • You probably already know this, but there are a lot of films, such as Showgirls or films by Russ Meyer, that pass the Bechdel Test despite the fact that they are FAR from positive portrayals of women. – jsanoff 1 year ago
    0
  • This could open up a really interesting argument into how low the bar is set for feminist media these days. If so many meet the requirements, are the requirements strict enough? Are they asking for enough? What would be a better test? – Mariel 1 year ago
    1
  • It's important to recognize that the Bechdel Test is a bare minimum of what should be required for female representation in media, not a be all end all. – Laura Andrea 12 months ago
    2
  • Good topic, because in my opinion, the Bechdel test sets the bar too low. Just because two female characters are named and have conversations unrelated to men, does not make them strong or memorable people. Films aimed at girls and women are particularly guilty, from Disney princess movies to Jane Austen adaptations to modernized "chick flicks." – Stephanie M. 7 months ago
    1
  • I've always wondered what the Bechdel test is trying to achieve. Is it trying to divide the genders, or empower females? Star Wars failed the Bechdel test, but Leia Organa is a stronger character than anything in the Ghostbusters remake.It also limits roles for women. If a women is playing a devoted parent, if her child is female, she passes; if her child is male, she fails. Surely that character would have the same level of strength regardless of the gender of her offspring. – AGMacdonald 4 months ago
    0
  • Maybe you could also look at other tests that measure equal representation in film and media (but it would be a good starting point!). – AnastasiaS 4 months ago
    0
Taken by AGMacdonald (PM) 2 months ago.