Film

Latest Articles

Film
28
Film
26
Film
35
Film
45
Film
29
Film
34
Film
27
Film
20
Film
38
Film
41

Latest Topics

5

Who is Rey? The identity of the newest hero in the Star Wars universe.

Using the hints in the movie ,Star Wars the Force Awakens, suggest possibilities who the character Rey is and what could be her possible origin. She appears to be the main character in the story and there are a few obvious possibilities who she really is. This would be an interesting topic to explore because the question as to her identity is a mystery thus far.

  • I feel like this has been the most talked about thing since the movie came out. It's such a big mystery, with many fans divided on who she's related to. Is she a Skywalker? I've also heard things about her being related to Obi-Wan Kenobi. And what is the importance of her family? Do you think it's a good idea that she's related to some other main character? – thewyverary 11 months ago
    1
  • Hopefully Rey doesn't become another River Song, where the question is asked and teased so much that eventually the audience no longer cares. – J.P. Shiel 11 months ago
    0
  • Another area you could think about is what is the significance of discussions related to her birth and genealogy?How would Rey as a character change if she was a Skywalker, a Kenobi or from a brand new bloodline. Would the viewer's view of the character change drastically based off the revelations of her identity/parentage. – SeanGadus 3 months ago
    1
  • If one wanted to get philosophical, one might address first, the speculation, but next, the reason behind it. Why do people care about her origins? Because they're a JJ Abrams 'mystery box'? They're never hinted to be relevant to THE story, just HER backstory. Because lineage matters in Star Wars? Because lineage matters in real life? Because of ESB? Will the solved mystery be underwhelming? Because of speculation?I tend to see a lot of guessing the 'truth' in fictional works, but haven't been able to determine what makes us seek it. Will Rey be a better/worse character if 'hey, her dad is Luke' and it holds no other significance.I dunno'... I guess this is a small part of a larger narrative: audiences prioritize plot when there's so much more in a story. Meditate on it if you desire. – m-cubed 3 months ago
    3
2

Amadeus and the Mark of Cain

Juxtapose the Biblical story of Cain and Abel with Milos Forman’s film Amadeus. Posit that the relationship between Salieri and Mozart mirrors the relationship between Cain and Abel.

Salieri perceives that God has betrayed his faith by granting more talent to Mozart, similar to the ways in which Cain feels that God has given Abel the upper hand. While Mozart’s cause of death was not murder, Salieri repeatedly expresses a desire to kill him. Salieri also spends so much time manipulating Mozart, while Mozart spends most of his time composing; similar to the work ethic of Cain and Abel.

At the end of the film, Salieri attempts to play God by "absolving" himself and his fellow psych ward inmates, much like Cain tries to play God by taking away a life.

  • Sorry I didn't mean to mark that as fixed, I just wanted to thank you for the note. I thought I was so witty and original for thinking of this! In all honesty, I'd much rather explore a different topic based on this recent discovery. But I'm glad you told me about this research. I'm reading the article now! – DrownSoda 1 month ago
    2
  • Unfortunately, I haven't seen Amadeus, but this makes me want to check it out. :) – Stephanie M. 1 month ago
    0
  • Genius! You have a talent for seeing connections. – Munjeera 4 weeks ago
    0
2

Portrayals of Omnipotence and Ascension in Japanese Animation

Princess Mononoke (Miyazaki), Paprika (Kon) and Akira (Otomo) were landmark films in the development of Japanese animation in the late 1900s and early 2000s. Otomo’s magnum opus has had an unprecedented impact on science fiction. Miyazaki’s groundbreaking work established his reputation as Japan’s most skilled animator. Kon’s film, on the other hand, is a showcase of his inimitable style paired with his excellent editing, detailed in a video by Every Frame a Painting.

(Spoiler Alert)
All three sport a familiar plot device that kicks in in the third act: the presence of an omnipotent being, though not quite fitting entirely in the definition. The three films end with the presence and emergence of a godlike figure-in PM, the Forest Spirit, in Paprika, the chairman and eventually Chiba/Paprika herself, and in Akira, the eponymous character. Personally, i found these three films (both because of their similarity in portrayals of omnipotence yet varying style, as well as the proximity of their releases) as good examples of a possible investigation into Japan’s preoccupation with omnipotent and powerful beings (most involve a kind of ascension, a veil that is passed through, a barrier crossed). Perhaps one could go further into analyzing Japan’s postwar cultural booms and how they eventually culminated in such films.

  • Hey thanks for the revision! Actually i did consider putting in under the anime category, but i wasn't entirely sure if it was strictly anime. The anime section and i suppose, by extension, the definition of anime itself is pretty widely contested, but i came to understand anime as more than just Japanese animation but the smaller subset of serialized animation within the larger sphere. I assumed "anime" to be long-form, that is, a series of episodes (ranging from 10-40) a season as opposed to Film, which i thought fit my bill of examples better. Hopefully someone more educated than me on such definitions could help clarify. – Matchbox 4 weeks ago
    1
4

Marvel Cinematic Universe: How much is too much?

The Marvel Cinematic Universe is complex and fascinating, and like many fans, I love the crossovers among the films. However, with the addition of several TV series (Daredevil, Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D., etc.), it seems nearly impossible to keep up with the intricacies of the world. With more TV content on the horizon for Marvel, I wonder if the platform is too much. It’s confusing for new watchers to fully understand the overall plot without having seen previous Marvel films. I think the argument can go both ways. On one hand, the multimedia platform is exciting and facilitates depth. On the other hand, is there a point when it will all be too much?

  • This is a very interesting point that you have brought up. With solo films for Black Panther, The Wasp and many other superheroes coming up too, it has become next to impossible to keep track of all the stories. One can also contrast the current times where a superhero film is released every 6 months and series like Luke Cage, Jessica Jones on Netflix ensure that we have stuff to watch all year round with say, a decade earlier when people used to have to wait for a couple of years to get a Batman or Spiderman movie. – Vishnu Unnithan 1 month ago
    4
  • Is it possible that the constantly growing scale of the MCU won't necessarily kill it but force it to become more and more niche? A casual viewer may reach the point of superhero fatigue or throw up their hands and say "I can't keep up with this anymore", but the more hardcore comic book fans who've kept abreast of decades of comic book history as well as all the multi-verses, galaxies, and timelines would theoretically still support these stories coming to life in all forms (as long as they maintained their level of quality). – LC Morisset 4 weeks ago
    2
  • You can never have too much Marvel. Just like you can't have too much ice cream. – Munjeera 4 weeks ago
    0
4

Super Heroes films as Genre Films

Super Hero films are here to stay. Each year a variety of super hero films are being released during the course of the year. While the genre "Super hero films" is the predominant label for these films, many super hero films fit very well into other established genres. Guardians of the galaxy fits well into the established Sci-Fi genre. Captain America 2’s cast and director said that the film was influenced by 70 thrillers. The trailer for the new Wolverine film title "Logan" used Johnny Cash’s haunting version of the song ‘Hurt’ to evoke a western feel. The director and star of Logan have gone so far as to dub it a "modern western". Recent trailers for Spider Man homecoming have focused Peter Parker’s high school experience, which might fit in with John Hughes films and other coming of age high school films.

A question that remains is this: What are the advantages and disadvantages of separating films from the label of "Super hero" films and putting them into other genres such as crime, western, sci-fi, and fantasy? Do we gain deeper insight into these super hero films when we examine the other genres that they are a part of.

Does saying that a super hero film like The Dark Knight is a crime film help the viewer better understand the film and thus analyze its themes?

This topic could be taken in many different directions depending the writer’s interest.

  • I agree with you. Super hero films have been and still are a go to choice as far as genre among people. and think are here to stay. They are popular for all ages. and I think are here to stay as far as popularity. You got me to put on my thinking cap on to separate the advantages and disadvantages on super hero films? – veyonna 4 months ago
    1
  • I think that there could be a backlash coming to super hero films. I think that, like the western, it will vanish. Eventually people will lose interest, especially once their favorite actors start being replaced e.g., Robert Downey Jr. will eventually not be Iron Man. I think that they should be put into the box that best represents the theme of the movie. Ant-Man is definitely a heist movie, up there with the Ocean's movies and doesn't bear much semblance to a super hero movie like Guardians of the Galaxy or The Dark Knight. – ZachCarlson 3 months ago
    1
1

Space Marines as Modern Military Satire

Few can watch a movie like Starship Troopers, and take it seriously. Most military satire incorporates some degree of jingoism and intensity to make a political point–but all these films run the risk of offending real people who sacrificed everything for their countries. But what if you place a movie in space? Make the adversary some alien–like a bug, gremlin, or otherworldly thing? Is sci-fi military the ultimate vehicle for satire?

    0

    The diversity of Best Picture Oscar Nominees 2017

    Explore the different topics and issues raised by this year’s Oscar Nominees: Arrival, Fences, Hacksaw Ridge, Hell or High Water, Hidden Figures, La La Land, Lion, Manchester by the Sea and Moonlight are, compared to one another, incredibly diverse, and they demonstrate that Hollywood this year has been experimenting in new interesting ways. Especially focus on issues of gender, race and genre.

      4
      Published

      The Success of Marvel Movies and Why DC Falls Short

      A long fought debate since the dawn of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. A comparison behind the cohesion between franchises, writing, and overall story arc between DC and Cinematic Marvel and where DC is heading next in order to keep up with and eventually catch Marvel. Could take many approaches for this.

      • A worthwhile topic. There are any number of possible reasons and explanations for why DC has been unable to live up to Marvel's success. This has come to a shock to a lot of people, considering that DC, overall, owns the more popular properties. I don't think anybody was expending Civil War to crush B v S in opening weekend box office the way it did; Batman and Superman are the two most famous superheroes of all time, and the lost out to an equally unnecessary grudge match between Iron Man and Captain America (who, it can be easy to forget, nobody outside of the highly esoteric world of comic book fandom had ever given a second thought prior to 2008). Personally, I think the biggest reason for DC's failure -- aside from the obvious point about Zack Snyder -- is a matter of anxiety of influence. It's actually not the case that this is a "long fought debate since the dawn of the Marvel Cinematic Universe," given that the DCEU only launched in 2013 with Man of Steel (i.e. five years after Iron Man 1) and only really became an extended universe this year with the release of B v S. Having come late to the party, DC is frantically trying to play catch-up, which has added the extra burden of trying to not seem as though they're overtly imitating their more successful rivals. The dark aesthetics that seem to have characterized their first three movies seems to be in direct opposition to the fun Whedonism that has contributed to the MCU's charm. This clearly deliberate differentiation effort has only worked against them, since it's operating off of the self-sabotaging premise of, "let's do the opposite of what seems to be working for Marvel." And the ironic thing is, the reason why the DCEU is so belated is because, while Marvel was getting things rolling with Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk, Christopher Nolan was busy releasing what is objectively the greatest superhero movie ever made. If DC had used Nolan's trilogy as the jumping-off point for their universe, they might have had a much better chance for success -- as they would have gotten started even before Marvel (Batman Begins being from 2005), with a much stronger foundation. However, because of the realism factor (which was a large part of what made The Dark Knight so good), the world that Nolan created proved to be not very conducive to the inclusion of other (more "super") heroes, requiring a fresh start. – ProtoCanon 4 months ago
        4
      • Would be helpful to define success here - is this cinematic quality of success? Financial? Quantity of movies? Appeal to the masses? Are there some areas that DC movies are more successful than Marvel? – Kevin 4 months ago
        1
      • I think part of Marvel's success has come from making a large cinematic universe that connects over many movies and two TV shows (Agents of SHIELD and Agent Carter). DC has TV shows that are not at all connected to the movies, which is why we are seeing two Flashes, instead of seeing the same actor play the same character in both TV and Film, like Agent Coulson. Also, Marvel built their world from the ground up, starting with iconic and traditionally important Marvel characters and working from there. DC started out by focusing on their most important characters, but then crashed (in my opinion) by making Suicide Squad. If you're a comics fan, you know that this completely ruins the normal timeline. We also skip over Harley Quinn's and all the other characters' origin stories. They tried to do too much too early. They should've known from Marvel's success that great movies are built on great and relatable characters. This is a really interesting topic, and one you can go in-depth on if you want. Great idea. – JamieRich 4 months ago
        1