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How to transition from YA literature to grown-up books

Most teenagers like books written by certain popular YA authors: Suzanne Collins, Stephanie Meyers, John Green, etc. How do these teenagers transition from reading YA literature to reading books that aren’t centered around the lives of teenagers?

  • I like the topic.I think maybe you should try connecting the difference between modern books that centre around teenagers and more classics that centre around "coming of age" and teenagers such as in Jane Eye. Also what is considered a grown up book? Maybe clarify this. – birdienumnum17 3 days ago
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The Modern Orphan Figure

There are several famous literary orphans, from Jane Eyre to Oliver Twist to Anne Shirley. Traditional orphanages have been replaced by more modern solutions but orphans as main characters are still quite prominent, from Harry Potter to Theo in the Goldfinch to Wade Watts, the protagonist of recent science fiction novel Ready Player One. Explore the use of this trope in modern day settings.

  • Leighann Morris's article "Why Are So Many Disney Parents Missing or Dead?" will be a really crucial resource for this topic: http://www.hopesandfears.com/hopes/culture/film/216573-disney-single-parents-dead-mothers – Piper CJ 11 months ago
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  • This is a recurring theme in many stories. I think Joseph Campbell's The Hero of a Thousand Faces can be a good resource for this paper, even though it is quite an old text. But I think it's a good idea to analyze how it works nowadays, perhaps it was a different meaning than it did back then. – odettedesiena 11 months ago
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  • Love this topic! There are so many literary orphans you could talk about. You might even argue the trope is one of the oldest, since so many fable and folktale characters are orphans. Another angle to explore: have modern orphans become stronger and more self-determined? And, does "orphan" currently mean "no parents," or does it mean, "child without adequate parental figures?" (Example: Katherine Patterson's Gilly Hopkins, whose mother is alive but absent). – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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  • I think this is a really good topic. You can add a psychological twist in how being an orphan, something that is a bit psychologically traumatic, can lead into resilience, strength and heroism. Maybe this is why so many great writers still use orphans as their main characters. – birdienumnum17 1 day ago
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What is the Aesthetic Value of Physical Literature As Opposed To Digital Literature Such as eBooks?

Am I the only one that prefers a physical book over electronic forms? There is something magical about the smell of a physical book. Seeing yours or other people’s notes in the margins. Having a tangible representation of a story? What is everyone’s opinion about this?

  • You could consider this topic from the point of illuminated texts such as the ones found in Ireland (Book of Kells)... Or even first edition printed copies of books. As someone who likes to collect physical books, I think there is a lot you could write about here. – Lauren Mead 2 weeks ago
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  • I would find studies or articles detailing if electronic books are starting to outpace physical books to see if the digital age is starting to see the end of the physical book medium. – BMartin43 2 weeks ago
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  • The materiality of a book is not only of value for the individual reader, but also research Topic in many insitutions. It might be interesting to look at the changing materiality of a text and how it is presented. – L.J. 2 weeks ago
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  • I finally broke down and got a Kindle for Christmas. I love it, but agree physical books are irreplaceable. There's something beautifully comforting about holding and reading a physical book. – Stephanie M. 1 week ago
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  • Yes, its as if I remember it more with a physical copy. – melanie614 1 week ago
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  • I agree with others that there is something tangible about holding a physical book in your hands. Maybe it's because you're more active: you have to turn the pages, feel the paper. Books have a smell that bring to mind a lifetime of perusing bookstores and libraries. I own a Kindle and I like it- I've ready many books on it. But it'll never fill me with the nostalgia (maybe that's what this is really about!) and satisfaction of a physical book. – Jesse Munoz 4 days ago
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  • I do like a physical book, but with my OCD it's hard for me to enjoy having a physical copy because I am so concerned with making sure it does not get dirty or any of the pages get bent. While I prefer reading a physical book, it's easier for me to manage an ebook. – ac7r 3 days ago
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Comparing The Aeneid and The Odyssey

Analyze the differing portrayals of ‘heroism’ in the Aeneid and the Odyssey, two epic poems which explore the lives of heroes after the events of the Iliad. What do these differences reveal about the different values of Romans (Vergil) and the Greeks (Homer)? Consider Aeneas’ internal struggle between acting in self-interest, as Odysseus often does, and following his destiny and exhibiting ‘pietas’. What roles do the influences of Octavian and Homer play in the Aeneid?

  • Good topic. Something worth addressing could be the different conditions in which the two texts came to be written and "finalized." Whereas it's widely accepted that Virgil was one autonomous author who penned his opus from start to finish, it's been argued that Homer's works were originally recited orally and written down by the author's (or possibly authors') disciples and compiled into the complete text by later editors. How might these different processes of composition have shaped the narratives within them? – ProtoCanon 2 weeks ago
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  • This is an awesome topic! The Aeneid and the Odyssey are truly national stories and can tell alot about what the Greeks and Romans valued for better or worse! Two great national works of literature. – SeanGadus 2 weeks ago
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The Chrysanthemums vs. Fifty Shades of Grey

Compare and contrast the short story by John Steinback, to the popular trilogy and motion picture. Both pieces use their plot and literary elements to depict sexual relationships with frustration and mild rage, but in entirely distinct ways. Explore each work and analyze the author’s purpose for both

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    Why Do People Not Like To Read Anymore?

    Why is it that people find it so difficult and unsavory to read? Very few people actually enjoy and take it upon themselves to read anything from literature, modern works, the news, or frankly anything that consists of many words that require analytical thought to understand. Has this become too much for people? Literacy should never be compromised.

    • Who are these people?! And also what makes you think we read less? I guess I don't know either way, but do you have some statistics saying that book sales are lower? Or libraries are empty? I know print is going away, but I think people still read news on line. Or read magazines. – Tatijana 1 year ago
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    • I can personally vouch for some of your sentiments. Despite my best intentions, it takes a lot of personal coaxing to get myself to sit down and read instead of doing something else. Because when I like to relax, I like to use my eyes and my hands or my ears rather than sit in the same position letting my eyes roll over a page. Although to be honest, I've had this inkling lately that I would get much more satisfaction from reading a book than watching a film, because often, the stories in some of the books I remember enjoying in the past were more engaging and dynamic than a lot of the films I enjoy. So I have plenty of reason to return to reading books. I just don't find myself doing it much, if at all, on a day to day, week to week, and month to month basis. I DO, however, read plenty of articles and stuff online, including here on the Artifice. It's just when it comes to books, especially thick or heavy ones, I have less of a tendency to pick one up. – Jonathan Leiter 1 year ago
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    • I think you would find it very difficult to argue that no-one reads when they would have to read your article to see your argument..? It could certainly be said that people's reading habits have changed: Online content tends to have shorter paragraphs to keep attention; short stories and poetry are starting to be more popular again because they can more easily be devoured in a short amount of time; if you really wanted to argue that people don't read at all, you could potentially look at the re-emergence of spoken-word poetry (such as Polarbear or Kate Tempest) and how people are listening to poetry because of podcasts, commutes etc. rather than buying poetry books and reading them (this can be proven with the poetry book sales vrs views on youtube etc. for said artists.) – Francesca Turauskis 1 year ago
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    • If you Google "people reading less" like I did, you may find more concrete examples to support the topic, as others have suggested. In an October 2015 study, to paraphrase, American people in general read less, but women and young adults read the most. I'd be curious to see why that is. Here's a link: http://electricliterature.com/survey-shows-americans-are-reading-less-but-women-and-young-people-read-the-most/ – emilydeibler 1 year ago
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    • This is very interesting. I would like to see some psychological articles interact with this reading into our culture, and possibly the implications of the dominance of social media. – emilyinmannyc 1 year ago
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    • Others above have questioned the general statement about 'people not liking reading'. But could it be asked, "What has happened to society's attention span?" Someone once said he reads the first paragraph of a book and if it doesn't interest him, he moves on. Really? I also heard someone say they won't watch any movie from the 70's or before because they are too slow. Where is the public's patience? I attended a lecture by a successful screenwriter and he said there is a golden rule in the biz that no one camera shot lasts longer than 8 seconds. I didn't believe him until I started counting at the movie theater and sure enough, the camera changes every 8 seconds. Does the 'fast' changes of camera shots, the high paced video games and instant chat of texting influence our attention span? Are we no longer satisfied with Fast Food and now demand Faster Food? This could be a relevant take on the subject. - Dr. T – DrTestani 1 year ago
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    • I this topic could be taken in the direction that people don't read as much as they used to. To support this idea, things such as the decline in business success of bookstores, or the rise of flash fiction as a popular form of literature can be examined. Is it that people no longer like to read, or that they would rather pull up a piece of flash fiction on their phone rather than lug a copy of Anna Karenina around with them? – MichelleAjodah 1 year ago
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    • I have to question such an absolute statement as literacy should never be compromised. I am not sure if you mean literary appreciation, which I definitely think can and should be compromised. I think that literacy is irrelevant and a completely different issue than what you are discussing before. Whether or not one can read does not mean that they will want to read, and I think that the causes for someone being illiterate are different for those who are less passionate to read. Anyway, I think this is an interesting topic, but the writer needs to have a wider view of the media landscape than saying that something should not be compromised. Perhaps, look at some of the benefits/harms of straying from normal reading activity, the changes in how people consume literature, and definitely why these changes have occurred, and perhaps where we are moving towards, whether it be some post-physical or post-social landscape of reading, or so on. – Matthew Sims 1 year ago
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    • I think this could also discuss increasing visual and other literacies that have taken primacy in a more visual culture. "Reading" itself has changed, and is no longer viewed as one person interacting with a text -> an author -> an idea, in a vacuum. Instead, reading has social elements (Oprah's bookclub, for example) and there are other motivations to read instead of just for literary learning. – belindahuang18 3 months ago
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    • I think this should also cover the use of audio and e-books which have seemed to replace "regular" reading. Are people possibly just getting too lazy to pick up a book or are they too busy to sit down and read? – kspart 3 months ago
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    • Something should be said about the new culture we live in when it comes to books. There is a reason why the argument on 'if we need libraries any more' even exist, or why Borders went out of business? I don't necessarily think people aren't reading anymore I just think how people are reading is changing... – cousinsa2 3 months ago
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    • I understand where you're coming from, but I also believe that, as technology continues to advance, people tend to read in a different setting or capacity. It's not necessarily that people are reading any less or are straying away from it as a whole, it just varies from person to person, what technologies they immerse themselves in, how it affects their time/motivation to read, etc. – caitlynmorral 3 months ago
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    • This could easily be an interesting article to explore with some substantial evidence. Instead of going in with the assumption that nobody reads anymore, try focusing more on the how; how people read. It's ridiculous to assume nobody reads, it's not to assume that people read differently than traditionally thought. – Shipwright 3 months ago
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    • You can even investigate how children's literacy today is compared to that of those in the 20th century. – BMartin43 3 weeks ago
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    • Perhaps you could tailor this to ask the following question: Why do people not like to read physical forms of literature. How has the digital age affected readership? – kraussndhouse 2 weeks ago
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    Can you subject the law to literary analysis?

    The tools of literary analysis help you submit cultures and texts that form these cultures to rigorous analysis. You can examine the rhetoric, the linguistic structures, etc that makes a text what it is. Can we do the same with law and what would such an examination yield?

    • The word 'slave' was never used in the original 3/5 clause, which says a lot about the culture at the time (I like to consider it a pre cursor to the Gag Rule). – m-cubed 3 weeks ago
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    • I believe the history of Western legal system is forked by dual branches: common vs. civil. Perhaps a good starting point is exploring the different philosophies of civil and common law in the West. From there, analyze and contrast how the legal system is written, reflecting the demands of society and its ideals. – minylee 2 weeks ago
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    What is the purpose of Dystopian Literature?

    Analyse what a Dystopia is whilst describing distinctive characteristics of the typical dystopian story. Draw comparisons between today’s societal struggles, such as the epidemic of social rebellion and political disagreements, and the dystopian story – could the purpose of this literary genre be the author’s portrayal of modern day society? Perhaps the author wishes to enlighten the reader of such issues in society through story-telling, an appealing and engaging form of media. Dystopian literature also sheds light on philosophical questions which could be further explored such as ‘What does is mean to be human?’. Most literature leaves the reader asking questions, however does this genre more so than others by forcing us to accept humanity’s flaws? Use literary examples throughout this discussion.

    • I think I might do a post focusing on this subgenre. – ChrisKeene 2 years ago
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    • Remember when Dystopia wasn't just in young adult media? Those were the days. – Lazarinth 2 years ago
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    • Also explore the idea of why so many dystopian books are at the forefront of modern education. Animal Farm, 1984, A Brave New World etc. as well as the outburst of "teen" literature. – vforvangogh 2 years ago
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    • This is an awesome topic!I love the idea and question of dystopian literature. Orwell especially, is a person you have to mention/focus on in this topic! – SeanGadus 4 weeks ago
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    • Explore what was happening during the time of the publication of the previously mentioned modern education books such as Animal Farm, 1984, and A Brave New World to find any other sparks that could have created the desire to write a dystopia novel. – AnthonyWright 3 weeks ago
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