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Latest Topics

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Of Monetary Value: The Artistry of the Undervalued

In this day and age the arts are one of the most freeing career paths a person can choose, from drawing and painting to animation and sculpture the field is vast and full of potential. Discuss why people devlue the art of learning these subjects, often expect work to be done for free, and then celebrate the art as beloved. Do we value the work and undervalue the artist? Is this ideal changing? Discuss how this mindset and belief that art is not of valur affects the "little" guy while allowing large main stream corporations to become highly monetarily successful.

  • The devaluing of art is constantly present in creative communities and it's a vicious cycle. The mentality is that "the smaller you are (reputation-wise) the less you can charge" otherwise "you'd be bigger," and "you have to work for it." And this thought process stifles one's ability TO grow while in a constant lack of proper support. Rather than pay a small creator for the time and effort they put into their work, people flock to brand merchandise or cheap widely distributed prints. What it boils down to is a lack of understanding on the part of the consumer for the market: they try to equivocate the price of the products while completely unaware of the resources spent to make them. "Why pay $20 for this when I can get it for $5 somewhere else." The need to make money in any form, forces small creators to accept low wages or to be paid in "exposure" because it's that or nothing, which in turn justifies the devaluing of their and others' art in future. So the cycle continues. Since art is so accessible, and there are so many artists out there, it's hard to stop this from happening. I'd love if the article included ideas on how to combat this mentality and educate consumers on where their money is going when supporting small creators. – Slaidey 3 days ago
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  • I also should have added that I do think the attitude toward smaller creators is shifting in some regard. Mentioning Patreon and sites which help support creators is relevant to the topic and could be worth mentioning :) – Slaidey 3 days ago
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Humanity of Renaissance Art

Put side-by-side subjects in medieval art appear generally as identical, flat and featureless, two-dimensional portraiture’s with white pasty faces. By referring to Jean Clouet’s Portrait of François I King of France, 1525-30; Hans Holbein’s The Ambassadors, 1533 and François Clouet’s A Lady in Her Bath, 1571 humanist thinking in the Renaissance period let artists embark on representing people physiologically unique from other humans. Realizing also that the artists’ works mentioned are a valuable part of history. The artists’ resurgent innovation begins in Italy where it is in respect to God’s handiwork of the human being, the body. Leading the way to a worldwide impression of days gone by which is in portraits of people with individual traits.

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    Loving Vincent

    The new movie "Loving Vincent" is a celebration of Van Gogh’s life. Write about the film that made history as the first fully painted feature film as an international effort.

    • By sheer coincidence I happened to acquire a copy of this film recently and watched it this evening. 'Loving Vincent' is a thing of beauty and an astounding project to undertake. I can only imagine the technical difficulties those involved had to overcome, but the end result is well worth the time and effort. Perhaps the only suggestion I could add to your topic suggestion is to also look at the artists involved in the film making and how they approached the subject matter, what research they did and what insight they (hopefully) gained into the art of Vincent Van Gogh. – Amyus 4 weeks ago
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    Kehinde Wiley and the Presidential Portrait

    Barack Obama recently selected Kehinde Wiley to paint his official portrait. Consider how Wiley’s works compare with those of other presidential portrait artists. In what ways can we consider Wiley’s work to be in a continuum with other presidential portrait artists? How can we anticipate his work will diverge from the traditions of presidential portraiture?

    • I think you have a great topic here. It's specific and being posted at a great time. I am excited to read this one. Everything about the Obama Administration was about change and creating new ground for future generations to stand on. Having his presidential portrait created should be no different. His portrait will define what America is, so comparing Obama's portrait to those before him is important. I also think looking at his legacy to the changing art industry may be interesting. – Emily 2 months ago
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    Locked

    Cats and the artists they keep

    Every "Caturday," the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art facebook page highlights a cat in an archival object in their collections. The array of their examples is vast, showcasing how artists have found inspiration and solace in their feline companions over the course of the history of contemporary art. What do such examples of interactions between cats and their artists demonstrate about the relationships of these two peculiar types of animals? How do artists celebrate or immortalize their cats?

    • Fascinating topic. Perhaps some attention could be paid to the relations between cats and artists of other mediums aside from the visual arts. To quote Robertson Davies, “Authors like cats because they are such quiet, lovable, wise creatures, and cats like authors for the same reasons.” That said, I'd understand if this broadens the scope too far beyond the specific Caturday event. – ProtoCanon 4 months ago
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    • I love it! A topic I would never have thought of in a million years (excuse the hyperbole). There's really nothing I can add to ProtoCanon's comments, so a thumbs up from me. Plenty of scope for cat-puns too! – Amyus 4 months ago
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    • LOVE the topic! – Stephanie M. 4 months ago
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    • What a fascinating topic. It would be really interesting to look at the different cultural significance of cats throughout history as this will be reflected in art also. It is also perhaps interesting to consider that cats may not have been always portrayed in a positive light. Also might be worth looking at animal imagery and the meaning behind the choice of cats in a particular artwork. As Amyus said, I would never have thought of this as a topic - very interesting choice. – SaraiMW 2 months ago
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    Taken by SaraiMW (PM) 1 week ago.
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    Greatest Portraits of all Times

    We all recognize Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci to be one of the most iconic portraits ever painted. But only the true art enthusiasts are aware of the greatest works of art ever. From the powerful Mr & Mrs. Clark & Percy by David Hockney to the Jan Six by Rembrandt, there are endless other portraits that are a treat for the eyes. In this post, we will enlist 10 of the greatest portraits of all times.

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      Is the increase of accessibility to art and media dissolving marketability of demographics?

      Everyone has preferences in regards to what becomes integrated into our self-identity.
      With the increase of choices, does marketing play a significant role any longer? Or, do people (even within niche markets) know what they want and how to find it; so as far as profits are concerned, it is more about quality than hype or any other strategy, thus bringing about a societal need to cultivate creativity?

      • This is an interesting topic.I do think that marketing will always play a significant role, even more so with the increase of choice. Regardless, of who the initial demographic, the goal is to draw as many people you can to whatever artistic medium . I think this topic is interesting, but a little broad. Perhaps you should narrow it down to one or two types of art and media. – MKLee 2 months ago
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      10

      tattoos: an element of visual culture, or fine art?

      Visual culture is the aspect of culture expressed in visual images. Visual culture includes but is not limited to advertising, buildings, photographs, movies, and apparel. Today tattoos are no longer considered a symbol of rebellion or subculture, but a form of self expression. We proudly adorn them on our skin for others to see. In recent years there have been fine art exhibitions that feature photographs of tattoos by famous tattoo artists. For example in 2015 the auction house Guernsey offered a collection of 1,500 images by some of the worlds foremost tattoo artists. But does the fine art community actually see tattoos as fine art, or decorations to permanently wear?

      • If the day comes that the million dollar paying critics accept tattoos as fine art the art industry will change drastically. Once tattoo artists become renown and their time to make work gets valued to the point of museum or major gallery level commissions, what will previously experienced collectors of art say or do? They can't collect tattoos, and their value depreciates over time as skin ages. How do tattoos break into the fine arts world with these limitations? Are images of tangible tattoos enough or will they always face some form of stigma? – Slaidey 4 months ago
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      • Cultural iconography is expressed through tattoos; from anime to tribal symmetry, the fact that an individual is able to create an expression of their identity of which is cultivated by their upbringing and society fits the definitions of what we are calling art. The issue is the canvas used, human skin. I have personally known individuals who's skill was originally cultivated through the root cause of their profession; a painter or visual artist, who became good enough to become a tattooist. They already think like, and behave like a painter who has made the choice to focus on tattooing as a means of ether, exploring a new medium, or a way to practice art while being able to pay the bills. If the art was instead done on a canvas there wouldn't be any difference in question. There is no way of owning an original, so as far as galleries are concerned, photography is the only way to create a "market" of sorts outside of the tattoo parlors themselves. I don't believe there to be an arbiter of taste, the event that is human expression does not depend on this or that critics opinion; it has been said that the writing on the bathroom wall is a more pure form of artistic expression than that of the person who creates with premeditated intent, especially when pecuniary gain is to had. On the other side of the issue, some go into tattooing due to the ease of "paint by numbers" techniques, the people who going to it with the mindset of making money and social status tend to produce lesser quality work than those who apply themselves due to their own passion for the art, this happens in all areas of expression. – LelandMarmon 3 months ago
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