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1

I watched you Nae Nae, now what? - Is the lack of lyrics a reflection on the attitudes of today's popular music listeners as a whole?

Comparison between songs that are more recent and ones that are older throw up a large number of differences in terms of lyrics. One prime difference is that newer songs have an increasingly decreasing (heh, see what I did there?) number of lyrics.
Examples –
‘You a Stupid Hoe’, ‘Turn Down For What’, ‘Now watch me whip, now watch me nae nae’, ‘I know you want me, you know I wan’cha’

Is this constant reduction in the number of words in a song a reflection on
a) Our memory – we can’t remember words to songs anymore, or it seems like a waste of time to do so.
b) Our attention span has dropped so low, that we can’t be bothered to listen to music that isn’t composed of repititive phrases, we can’t be bothered to exert the effort to figure out what longer, more extensive lyrics say.
c) Just bad taste.

Is it a combination of all three?
Is it a different reason altogether?
Is there a more complex reasoning behind this?

  • I think the simplicity of minimal and shallow lyrics isn't exactly a reflection of our intelligence more so that it's necessary for certain moments. There are several music genres that thrive with complex, poetic lyrics such as Hip-Hop, Alternative and arguably some Pop music and they are highly praised. Kendrick Lamar, Big Sean and Kanye West are insanely successful rappers if for nothing else then for the complexity of their wordplay. All of the songs you listed weren't created with the intention of making people come to profound revelations; they are simply dance songs. The only job they have is to get you to shake what your momma gave you and they do it well. – sastephens 6 months ago
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  • I agree with sastephens. I think different genres of music are meant to satisfy different drives and relate to different moods. That's why if someone has an eclectic taste in music, he or she can more easily adapt and access a range of different personas than someone with a more limited musical palette. There are certain songs that are meant to be shallow, but incredibly catchy and there are deeply meaningful songs that aren't designed to get burned into listeners' brains via radio overkill. Obviously, there are those instances where songs are both catchy and deep (and it's really terrific when that happens, but not every song has to do that to be a good song). I do agree that there's a trend recently of repetitive, catchphrase-type songs. It may be an attention-span thing as you mention since our tech-obsessed world is dealing with that problem as a whole. I've heard this trend's been happening with movie titles for that very reason. – aprosaicpintofpisces 6 months ago
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  • I think its a combination of bad taste and the fact that it will simply make millions of dollars. Those songs are what dominates the charts. They aren't groundbreaking; they are just meant for a night out. And that's fine, but it would be great to get back to songs with more substance. That's just how our culture is right now. The attention span is decreasing. I like to believe that there are still a lot of people who respect and identify with great lyrics. Right now it's the trend but I think people want more depth in a song. – joshmccann 5 months ago
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6

How did politics permeate Pop Music of the 60s?

The 1960s overflowed with social injustices, civil rights, and the Vietnam War. The civil rights movement and the Vietnam War took center stage. Activists exercised democracy in action, demonstrating their rights under the First Amendment. These protests were breeding grounds that forged a path to songs by musicians with a social conscience. Protest songs of the 60s were instrumental in shaping domestic policy. "Times They are a Changin", by Bob Dylan became a theme song of the civil rights movement. "Eve of Destruction" by Barry McGuire influenced legislators to reduce the voting age to 18 with the line, "You’re old enough to kill, but not for votin". Jimi Hendrix’s solo, spell binding guitar rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner" at Woodstock was symbolized to be the most influential protest song of the 60s. What other songs contributed to change in America by utilizing American values?

  • I would recommend looking into Peter, Paul and Mary, Pete Seeger and others who collaborated with them for more on this topic. – LisaM 6 months ago
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  • It doesn't get any more accurate or pointed than Dylan's "Masters of War," or "Only a Pawn in Their Game." Dylan just added another trophy - the Nobel - to his shelf, by the way. Not bad for a guy who couldn't get a band in high school. – Tigey 6 months ago
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  • This topic would make a great regular column. There's so much ground to cover. Practically limitless, really. – albee 6 months ago
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  • Absolutely! I felt this way, but had to put the brakes on. – Lorraine 6 months ago
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  • To quote the seagulls from "Finding Nemo, "Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine. Mine." This should be fun. – Tigey 6 months ago
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  • This would be interesting to hear more about. Many American think of Creedence when it comes to Vietnam "era" music. I would like to know about other pieces that impacted the movement and vice-versa. – dekichan 2 months ago
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  • This topic is a very good topic, it could even make a great column. – jhennerss 2 days ago
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2

Visualizing Terror: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Visualizing terror is no easy task for filmmakers and writers, given the sensitive nature of the topic. Several productions have tackled the subject in various ways with shifting point of views and emphasises. Examples include Air Force One (1997), Bloody Sunday (2002), Omagh (2004), Syriana (2005), Munich (2005), World Trade Center (2006), The Baader Meinhof Complex (2008), Olympus Has Fallen (2013). How is terror visualized? What purpose does it serve to portray it? Where does fiction start?

  • "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" just serves as a good title. It might be referenced in the article, though it is a fictional event that focuses not on terror but more on coping with it. It might be a good starting point in the article as well, maybe with a quote or Illustration or something. – L.J. 4 days ago
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  • This is an interesting topic that could be filled in with a little more shape if you pinpoint the aspects of film-making or writing the author should/could use. Perhaps a suggestion on not only how terror is visualized but also on the politics of representation and the limits of the visual. – Jonathan Judd 22 hours ago
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2

What is the Aesthetic Value of Physical Literature As Opposed To Digital Literature Such as eBooks?

Am I the only one that prefers a physical book over electronic forms? There is something magical about the smell of a physical book. Seeing yours or other people’s notes in the margins. Having a tangible representation of a story? What is everyone’s opinion about this?

  • You could consider this topic from the point of illuminated texts such as the ones found in Ireland (Book of Kells)... Or even first edition printed copies of books. As someone who likes to collect physical books, I think there is a lot you could write about here. – Lauren Mead 6 days ago
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  • I would find studies or articles detailing if electronic books are starting to outpace physical books to see if the digital age is starting to see the end of the physical book medium. – BMartin43 6 days ago
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  • The materiality of a book is not only of value for the individual reader, but also research Topic in many insitutions. It might be interesting to look at the changing materiality of a text and how it is presented. – L.J. 5 days ago
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  • I finally broke down and got a Kindle for Christmas. I love it, but agree physical books are irreplaceable. There's something beautifully comforting about holding and reading a physical book. – Stephanie M. 5 days ago
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  • Yes, its as if I remember it more with a physical copy. – melanie614 4 days ago
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1

Comparing The Aeneid and The Odyssey

Analyze the differing portrayals of ‘heroism’ in the Aeneid and the Odyssey, two epic poems which explore the lives of heroes after the events of the Iliad. What do these differences reveal about the different values of Romans (Vergil) and the Greeks (Homer)? Consider Aeneas’ internal struggle between acting in self-interest, as Odysseus often does, and following his destiny and exhibiting ‘pietas’. What roles do the influences of Octavian and Homer play in the Aeneid?

  • Good topic. Something worth addressing could be the different conditions in which the two texts came to be written and "finalized." Whereas it's widely accepted that Virgil was one autonomous author who penned his opus from start to finish, it's been argued that Homer's works were originally recited orally and written down by the author's (or possibly authors') disciples and compiled into the complete text by later editors. How might these different processes of composition have shaped the narratives within them? – ProtoCanon 7 days ago
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  • This is an awesome topic! The Aeneid and the Odyssey are truly national stories and can tell alot about what the Greeks and Romans valued for better or worse! Two great national works of literature. – SeanGadus 7 days ago
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2

How Does Anime use other Historical Periods for Inspiration?

In Anime such as Full Metal Alchemist, anime can be seen pulling story and other aspects from different historical time periods. This can affect they way the production is portrayed. Discuss the different historical time periods that Anime pulls from and how they affect the plot. story line, costumes, and characters. As well as how the original history compares to the Anime

  • It would be a good idea to compare the real history with that of the anime. – BMartin43 2 weeks ago
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  • It would be helpful to anybody who is interested in writing on this topic to have a list of anime that are set in particular historical periods to aid in research. Let me start by suggesting Mushi-Shi. It's set between the Edo and Meiji periods and the way the fantastical intersects with the mundane in it is very fascinating. – Lokesh Krishna 6 days ago
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2

Groundhog Day (1993): thematic roots in Buddhist and existential philosophy

Analyze how Groundhog Day (1993) has thematic roots in Buddhist and existential philosophy, particularly Friedrich Nietzsche’s concept of eternal recurrence, and how it offers a compelling look at the process of change and approaching a more authentic existence.

Bill Murray does a convincing job portraying the various stages of the path, making his transformation from cynical/nihilistic to genuinely kind-hearted believable.

    1

    The Chrysanthemums vs. Fifty Shades of Grey

    Compare and contrast the short story by John Steinback, to the popular trilogy and motion picture. Both pieces use their plot and literary elements to depict sexual relationships with frustration and mild rage, but in entirely distinct ways. Explore each work and analyze the author’s purpose for both

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      Anime

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      Manga

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