Featured Articles

Anime
41
Literature
61
TV
29
TV
43
Arts
53
Film
35
Arts
35
Film
28

Latest Topics

1

End Game: An act of genocide or an agent for change.

Analyse existentialism and Thanos as a free and responsible agent of change through his own genocidal acts in the name of environmentalism, make a comparison to the environmental concerns we face today and if Thanos was right in his efforts to decrease or eliminate the population.

    2

    What is in an anime opening?

    This topic involves an examination of the animated opening/ending credits sequences that bookend most popular modern anime. In anime, an opening credits sequence often highlights main characters, hints at plot arcs, and features the names of studio staff, all while synchronized to music. Analyze how an opening may influence the "tone" of a show, and how that may correlate to sub-genre. What does a "good" opening sequence do for an anime? What does it do or provide for audiences? Perhaps look into the history of opening/ending credits sequences in anime to compare how fans view & share these openings today online. (I had some trouble coming up with a catchy title, so any and all suggestions are welcome!)

    • Hmm, for title suggestions, maybe something like "How an Anime's Opening Affects Its Audience's Expectations" or something in that vein, since the focus seems to be on how the opening sets the mood and expectations for those watching. – Emily Deibler 1 day ago
      3
    • ^Agreed with the title suggestion. It will also be interesting to analyze how a great anime opening/ending has furthered the career of singers/musicians/artists. For instance, I am automatically attracted to any songs from Asian Kung-Fu Generation used for an Op or Ed. I have discovered this band thanks for anime but now, I find myself "liking" shows thanks to their contribution. – kpfong83 17 hours ago
      0
    3

    TVDU and it's abundance of LGBTQ ships

    The Vampire Diaries and its spinoffs (The Originals, Legacies) and canonically full of mostly heterosexual relationships, but a significant portion of the show’s followers and fans are deeply committed too gay, lesbian, bi and pan ships that have little chance of setting sail or solidifying. Is this because of the show runners? Is this because of the channels it’s airing on?

    • Great topic! Be sure to check a couple typos ("are" instead of "and" in the first sentence). More importantly, though, I would recommend looking at queer-baiting across fandom. Fans have spent decades building huge archives of fan work dedicated to LGBT+ "ships" to compensate for the lack of LGBT+ relationships in mainstream television shows. I would recommend looking into reasons why fans feel so strongly about these ships, and then look at some statistics about LGBT+ representation on tv. Also, can fans ever go "too far" with these ships? The Vampire Diaries is a great series for this topic, but I've seen a similar trend with Supernatural, Game of Thrones, and lots of anime. – Eden 1 day ago
      0
    6

    What does Mob Psycho 100 say about individuals?

    Mob Psycho 100 is a series from the creators of One Punch Man. Focusing on the title character of Shigeo "Mob" Kageyama. Mob is a esper, he learns as a child that his powers are link to his emotional state. As a result he is emotionally muted and appears with a blank expression. He has no friends (in the beginning) and is social awkward. In contrast, the character of Reigen is the opposite of Mob.

    Reigen is the boss and master of Mob. He is a con man, whom, uses the power of his words to manipulate his clients into believing he is helping them with their problems. A common theme that is brought up in the series is the idea that Mob’s psychic powers are one aspect of him and he is no better than other’s. Reigen believes that his powers are really no different from someone who can sing, dance or play a sport. Basically, everyone has something special about them.

    Explore the theme from the series, that we all are special in different ways. Question what the difference between being ordinary and extraordinary is. Explore how the various characters, specifically, Mob and Reigen display the theme.

    • Yes, so much yes. The idea of "being the protagonist of your own story" is a great theme to delve into, as well as the emotional lessons of the story. I would also touch on additional characters and how they negotiate having powers, i.e. being special, with their level of emotional maturity. Ristu, Serizawa, Sho, Hanazawa, and Toichiro all cope with being "special" in healthy and unhealthy ways. I'd be very excited to read a piece about this. – Eden 8 months ago
      4
    5

    Fan Fiction: Credible Art Form or 'Kind of Lame'?

    Fan fiction seems to be a bit like Marmite: fans of original fiction either love it or hate it.

    When I took my ‘first foray’ into the realms of fan fiction, I was surprised to encounter a wider range of sub-genres, tropes and terminology than I had realised…

    Sequels and prequels to other authors’ narratives, along with spin-off texts, new characters and ‘non cannon’ rewrites can prove contentious–especially when fans feel that the new text undermines or distorts aspects of the original work.

    Yet, for some people, it extends the enjoyment gained from the original text and adds dimensions to the fictional universe in question. It can prove satisfying to read (or write) a character’s backstory or find out what happens next–even if these events and characters were created by someone else and/or not generally considered to be ‘cannon.’

    In some cases, prequels, sequels and rewrites by different writers–without the approval or authorisation of the original author-have become published or otherwise firmly established in mainstream culture. Examples include Jean Rhys’s ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’ (a prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s ‘Jane Eyre’), and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s stage adaption (and rewrite) of Gaston Leroux’s ‘Phantom of the Opera’ and a sequel, ‘Love Never Dies.’

    In the case of the latter, Lloyd Webber’s narrative is arguably better known than the story it was based on.

    Does this mean that, what essentially began as a form of fan fiction has now entered the literary/cultural ‘cannon’? If so, at what point does this happen and how do we decide which ‘fan fictions’ become ‘cannon’?

    I’d love to hear other people’s thoughts on the topic of fan fiction, particularly with regards to ‘intertextuality’ and Barthes’ theories on ‘The Death of the Author.’

    • I love the subject matter being explored here, and I think it would make a great article. Another random "fan fiction" of sorts that was adopted into the literary cannon would be John Gardner's Grendel from 1971 that built on the story of Beowulf from the antagonist's perspective. I hope someone picks this up! – Aaron 8 months ago
      1
    • The mind is a entity that knows no bounds. More often than not we see people through a third eye, imagining what they would do if they were faced by different circumstances. We need to live and let live, let people create their own worlds. – MsLinguista 8 months ago
      1
    • I gave up writing fan fiction years ago after three of my sub-plots for Star Trek Voyager mysteriously appeared in the next season. I wrote a novelette titled 'Thursday's Child' in which Ensign Kim assumed the (temporary) captaincy of Voyager and a member of the crew became pregnant, later giving birth to Voyager's first baby. Both ideas were roundly slammed by other fans, stating that they would never happen - but they did, in the very next season. A scene I wrote had Torres and Paris stuck on a desert planet, trying to survive long enough for Voyager to find them. A very similar scene, only set on a frozen planet, which even had very, very, similar dialogue between the two appeared in a later Voyager episode. Now I'm not accusing anyone of plagiarism (I can't afford the legal fees! LOL), but I began to wonder if the writers for Voyager (and other shows) occasionally scanned fan fiction for ideas they could use? Why not? It's cheaper than hiring a new writer. – Amyus 3 days ago
      1
    • The music for "Love Never Dies" is absolutely stunning, and was actual rather controversial around my circle. However, this example makes me wonder if a re-adaption counts as fanfiction in some cases or not. R.R Martin said about A Game of Thrones that the show could not do the same things the books could do, and so they were in essence their own thing.However, one's creative efforts in fanfiction can teach plot driving and story mechanics. It can build community. Although I am not a fanfiction writer, or common reader, I admire the community for its ability to come together.PBS' Storied actually did a Youtube video on a similar topic. It might have some more interesting ideas on the subject. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdDIMOehLm8 – ruegrey 13 hours ago
      1
    9

    The Silent Protagonist

    Analyse what makes a silent protagonist work and what doesn’t: when does a game benefit from having one? When does it not? What are some instances where a silent protagonist could have been better as a speaking one, or vice versa?

    Or maybe, what warrants the use of a silent protagonist, particularly in plot-heavy, character-driven series’ like Persona? How are they characterised, if at all, and why?

    • Could look at Link in The Legend of Zelda as well! – Sean Gadus 5 months ago
      1
    • There's also the case where silent protagonists stop becoming silent in the series, such as Jak in Jak and Daxter. – Emily Deibler 5 months ago
      1
    • One could consider the role of the silent protagonist’s “silence” as it pertains to immersive purposes. Some silent characters are not only mute—they have no explicit Idiosyncrasies or traits to establish themselves as full characters. Others, like Link in “The Wind Waker,” have more a sense of character through facial expressions and other complex reactive behaviors to story and gameplay elements. Exploring this dichotomy can prove useful in answering the question of the benefit of a silent protagonist. – James Polk 3 months ago
      0
    1

    The Evolution of Mills and Boon Romance Novels

    Analyse the history and evolution of the Mills and Boon romance novels. How the content and cover art changed throughout the years.

    • Mills and Boon romance novels have been around for so many years, maybe like 50 or 100. You can analyze how they evolved over the years in terms of their covers (illustrations on the covers) as well as the stories themselves. For example, more recent versions have more explicit language. – nsafwat 7 days ago
      0
    2

    COVID-19 on (lack of/Postponed) Movie Releases in Theatres

    Obviously, COVID-19 has seemed to stop everyone in their tracks, even postponing blockbusters including No Time to Die (James Bond) and Black Widow. What does this mean for the theatres? Will the pushing back of highly desired films start the habit of staying at home and opting for an online streaming service (ex. Netflix/Hulu)? Will movie theatres be an item of the past? How have movie theatre sales been affected by past trauma?

    • This is a great question. I'm curious how this will affect the culture of cinema as a whole if the experience of going to the movies is taken away completely. – sophiawestover 17 hours ago
      0

    Film

    Aesthetics of Tableaux Shots In A Globalising World
    Aesthetics of Tableaux Shots In A Globalising World
    All The Director’s Men: A Notable Kennedy Narrative
    The Paradox of the Strong Female Character
    The Rise of Skywalker Succeeds As A Legacy Film But Illustrates The Flaws Of Disney Era Star Wars

    TV

    The X-Files: A Feminist’s Analysis of Gender Imbalance
    The X-Files: A Feminist’s Analysis of Gender Imbalance
    The Mainstream Effect of SNL
    Person Of Interest: The Art of putting Kant’s Philosophy into a Computer
    The Sobering World of BPD in ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’

    Animation

    How Princesses of Color Have Improved the Disney Princess Narrative
    How Princesses of Color Have Improved the Disney Princess Narrative
    The Legendary and Cautionary Tale of The Simpsons
    Ray Harryhausen: The Monster Maestro
    Live-Action Disney Remakes and the Souring Faith in Animation

    Anime

    Anime in America: The Adverse Affect on Women
    Anime in America: The Adverse Affect on Women
    The Religious Politics of Hellsing Ultimate
    Interpreting Live-Action Adaptations of Anime
    Exploring The Theme of Death in Anime

    Manga

    The Horrifying Appeal of Junji Ito
    The Horrifying Appeal of Junji Ito
    One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
    Manga: How to Travel Between Dimensions
    Naruto: The Unresolved Revolution

    Comics

    Monstress: World-Building With a Feminist Twist
    Monstress: World-Building With a Feminist Twist
    Why Has Batman’s Origin Remained So Iconic?
    Feminist Criticism of Society and Comic Books’ Past
    The Batman/Catwoman Wedding Is Supposed to Upset You

    Literature

    The Giver: Memory, Meaning and Belonging
    The Giver: Memory, Meaning and Belonging
    An Analysis into Screen Adaptations
    Edgar Allan Poe: Unknown Horrors
    How Cosmic Horror Made Paganism Great Again

    Arts

    Problematic Creators: How Do We Interact With Their Work?
    Problematic Creators: How Do We Interact With Their Work?
    Gavazov and the Eastern European Art Scene
    Alienation in Simon and Garfunkel’s Music
    Craft-Mageddon: The Explosion of DIY Culture

    Writing

    The Relationship between Travel and Creative Writing
    The Relationship between Travel and Creative Writing
    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Planning for a Better Communication
    The Emergence of New Media Writing