Featured Articles

Games
26
Games
31
TV
34
Film
44
Games
31
Arts
43
Writing
53
Film
35

Latest Topics

2

To what extent did Virginia Woolf's family influence her depiction of families in her novels?

In many of Virginia Woolf’s novels (such as "The Voyage Out", "Night and Day", "Mrs Dalloway", "To the Lighthouse" and "The Years"), the concept of family, and in particular family breakdown, appears. Considering her own life (her parents, brother, and half-sister all died when she was relatively young), does her family influence this portrayal of families? Obviously, one would have to give biographical information about Woolf and a description of the principle families in some of the novels (Mr and Mrs Ramsay in "To the Lighthouse", the Dalloways in "The Voyage Out" and "Mrs Dalloway", etc.)

    1

    The Male Dominance of Art Institutions

    Analyse the extent to which art institutions remain male dominated. Some institutions actively aim to promote and encourage female artists, but others, particularly state and national galleries consistently show blockbuster male artists. This can be seen as discouraging for women and girls aspiring to work in any kind of art field, but can also just be a reflection of the underrepresentation of women in the art industry.

      1

      Narnia: The Silver Chair, is it doomed?

      Is the new Chronicles of Narnia film doomed for failure? Discuss the struggles of making the film slated to reboot the franchise almost 7 years after the last movie (Voyage of the Dawn Treader) and 3 studios later (was Disney then Fox and now the new studio). Will it do as well as the original trilogy or has it lost its momentum?

        2

        Women's language in Mrs Dalloway

        Virginia Woolf was a declared feminist, although critics find it a struggle to claim her works for feminism. Her writing style—the multiplicity of perspectives and her stream of consciousness technique—were argued to be presenting a “denial of authentic states of mind, namely the ‘angry and alienated ones’” (Elaine Showalter). Woolf has also been accused of simply subscribing to the “separation of politics and art” because she refuses to “describe her own experience,” instead always relying on shifting points of view (Moi 3). However, it may be possible to reclaim Woolf’s works for feminism by reevaluating these same aspects of her work. Is she demonstrating a new way to grapple with language to suit the needs of the woman in the modern age?

          4

          What is the appeal of time travel stories?

          Time travel is a frequently revisited topic in both popular and literary fiction. What is the philosophical appeal of time travel? Does it simply speak to our personal regrets or to large global/political/social issues that we wish to undo? Is it egotistical to think that ‘hight sight is twenty-twenty’; that to know the negative outcome of one event/one decision would allow us to course correct and thereby find success? Can humanity (globally or personally) only learn or develop compassion through disaster?

          • I personally think that the appeal of time travel stories lies in our flawed nature as humans. The possibility of reversing/changing the outcome of our own mistakes and/or the wider worlds' is very appealing, as well as egotistical (we get to play the hero). However, the appeal also lies in the unknown i.e., what will the alternative outcome be if I go back in time and ensure Hitler wasn't born? Will there be a better outcome or a worse one? That's just my opinion on the topic though! – Ness 1 week ago
            1
          • I think it is a case of regret. Everyone has defining moments in their lives that determined the course of their life trajectory. In those vulnerable moments of self-doubt, it is only human to wonder about the road less travelled.A few suggestions for revisions:Perhaps "hightsight" could be fixed to read "hindsight." I think this is a great topic but would narrow the focus to an individual's life. Most people may not have the clout to decide world events, with all due respect to our readership.Also, examples like the Arrow and Flash and even Quantico have employed the flashback sequence. Would you want to include the examples you have in mind so the writer of this topic can understand your meaning more clearly? – Munjeera 1 day ago
            0
          • I've always loved time-travel stories. The appeal for me is the idea of not being tied down to any one place and not missing out.The ability to travel anywhere, during any time is the superpower that I've always wanted. There are moments in history that I would love to be apart of. And I have this unquenchable thirst to see space, and other planets and their civilisations.Not to mention, time travel means shirking responsibilities. Not being tied down to anything or anyone.For me, it's simple wanderlust to the extreme extent. – KintaW 21 hours ago
            1
          2

          Body Language as the Catalyst of Passion in Jane Austen's PERSUASION

          Jane Austen is well-known for her witty dialogue, back-and-forth banter between characters, and free-indirect discourse; yet, Persuasion is a complete departure from all of her previous works. Persuasion is a more ‘adult’ novel, with the female protagonist as a 27-year-old unmarried woman. Her once betrothed, whom she denied due to his lack of wealth and societal stature after persuaded by her aunt, has returned to her life seven years later. The lack of dialogue that ensues between these two characters throughout the majority of the novel creates a level of excruciating passion and anticipation that is palpable, and unmatched in any other work by Austen. Focusing on the sensory capabilities of the two characters creates a sensual environment where the body remains in the foreground. When reviewing Austen’s breach from the traditional overload of dialogue and new reliance on body language, the power of perception and keen sensual prowess, do we in fact have a more ‘adult’ geared book, matching her own age, and possible longing for more sensuality, and less games?

          • I would compare Austen's previous works to this novel to get a better sense of what has changed in terms of story mechanics. – BMartin43 2 days ago
            2
          3

          1970's Film and the Failure of the Studio System

          Known as the "maverick" or "auteur" era of American film, the 1970’s represented a unique era of American film-making, perhaps the most experimental since early silent ear. Traditional musicals, melodramas, and epics were no longer drawing in audiences, and, desperate, studios began giving money to fledgling directors often fresh from the brand new film schools cropping up, leading to far more daring and unusual films, such as Taxi Driver, the Godfather, and Star Wars. Well documented as this period is, take some time to examine the period just preceding, and how it enabled these films to exist at all.
          That is, look back, first at the Paramount Decision in 1948, which ended the studios monopolies on theatres and film distribution and enabled independent filmmakers to gain foothold in the American film landscape, and the rise of television in the 1950’s, which forced to make going to the movies far more of an event, with big-budget epics, full color, and features such as 3-D and widescreen. By the late 1960’s, the mediocre performances of the anachronistic Hello, Dolly! and plodding Cleopatra rendered tried and true money makers impotent. Examine how changing audience expectations, over saturation of the market, and other such factors allowed movies like Bonnie and Clyde to set the scene for the New Hollywood of the 1970’s. If the studio system hadn’t failed, would the 1970’s era of film-making ever been allowed to happen in the first place?

          • I would include certain film and TV examples that defined where the Studio System was heading towards. – BMartin43 1 day ago
            0
          3

          Does contemporary art attract more artistically minded individuals

          Traditional art is based upon faultless technique, well-defined subject matter and definitive notions of beauty, while modern art is based upon personal expression, vision, originality and innovation. Analyse the idea that traditional art is more focused on portraying a theme or suggestion that is attractive or realistic to the eye, while modern art is more intent on conveying a theme or idea that is relevant to everyday life.

          Based on this response, do individuals who prefer modern art over traditional appreciate artwork on a deeper and more meaningful level?

          • I hope this clarifies the topic a little better. – Ness 4 days ago
            1
          • This is a good topic. I think the argument could go either way, based on opinion and experience. I think personal upbringing and culture may play role as well. You might want to add that in. – birdienumnum17 2 days ago
            1
          • Great topic. It is important to remember the different priorities in traditional art practises. In renaissance and neo classicism, artists were trained technically, with a priority of replicating reality. This obviously does not take much understanding to comprehend. Having said this, perhaps it is a reason why artistically minded people are more interested in contemporary art that holds more hidden meaning? There is so much room for debate in this topic! – emhand 24 hours ago
            0
          • An intriguing topic. I think that people who are not artistically minded appreciate traditional art over modern art because their talent is undeniable, as seen with their perfect execution of technique and beauty (as you have aforementioned). However artist, art theorists and other artistically minded people may appreciate modern art because of the idea's they are trying to convey. I think the idea of the "individual" needs to be redefined as either "do you think that the general public prefer modern art over traditional", or "do you think that contemporary artists / theories prefer modern art over traditional". The individual is a debatable perspective to write under. – Jessica Carmody 6 hours ago
            0

          Film

          Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”
          Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”
          Super Heroes films as Genre Films
          Mythological Motifs in Mainstream Media
          The Legacy of Princess Carrie

          TV

          Black Mirror: A Look at Modern Day Paranoia
          Black Mirror: A Look at Modern Day Paranoia
          “The Flash” as the Modern Equivalent of 1960’s “Batman”
          ‘My 600-Lb Life’: Dead Weight TLC Should Shed?
          Once Upon A Time: A Work of Creative Genius or a Tangled Mess?

          Animation

          Feminism and Disney: They’re Not As Different As You Might Think
          Feminism and Disney: They’re Not As Different As You Might Think
          Disney and the Perils of Adaptation
          Masculinity in Steven Universe: A Matter of GEMder?
          The Legend of Korra: Empathizing with Villains

          Anime

          The anime gold rush in the early 21st century
          The anime gold rush in the early 21st century
          The Magic and Artistry of Studio Ghibli’s Films
          Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
          Death Parade: Humanity in Yuzuru Tachikawa’s Anime

          Manga

          One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
          One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
          Manga: How to Travel Between Dimensions
          Naruto: The Unresolved Revolution
          The 5 Saddest Moments in One Piece

          Comics

          Comic Books, Adults, and a History of Stigmatization
          Comic Books, Adults, and a History of Stigmatization
          The Social Stigma of Comic Book Reading
          What Should Happen To Captured Super Villains?
          Finding the Bridge Between Superhero Comics and Hip-Hop

          Literature

          Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
          Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
          The Power of Biographies: A study of The Road To Nab End
          Terror and Horror in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado”
          Fahrenheit 451: What’s In a Tale?

          Arts

          Discovering the Five Poussin’s in ‘Gallery 617’
          Discovering the Five Poussin’s in ‘Gallery 617’
          Understanding Abstract Art
          The Future of Cultural Accomplishments: A Look into the Creative Virtue of Artificial Intelligence
          Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO

          Writing

          Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak
          Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak
          Parallel and Alternate Realities; Fiction Tells us the Difference
          Genre Fiction in University Writing Programs: No longer the MFA’s Red-headed Stepchild
          Can you Teach Someone how to Become a Writer?