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Is disabling comments on internet articles and videos brave or idiotic?

When online publications release a video or an article that covers a controversial topic or expresses a provocative opinion, more and more frequently the moderators of the website decide to preemptively disable the comments section. Is this a smart idea, given that some topics on more popular websites will inevitably draw internet trolls or similar undesirables to flood comment sections with useless vitriol that overpowers legitimate discussion? Or is this an idiotic action that stifles any chance of legitimate discussion for fear of having to deal with hateful or useless material? Are moderators afraid of being accused of fostering a hateful environment if they allow this material to be presented in their forums? This is especially relevant given that many websites feature a voting system for their comment sections which allow audiences to give relevant comments more visibility based on the opinions of the people actually reading the article or watching the video, thereby allowing audiences to self-regulate what material they choose to engage with.

  • I would suggest being wary of using qualitative terms like "brave" or "idiotic" without strong supporting data (statistics, news headlines, polls, website usage data, etc.). What defines "brave" or "idiotic" is subjective. This feels like it could include a bigger discussion about freedom of speech, censorship, cyber bullying, and hate speech. I would be very interested if this focused on one platform like a case study (YouTube, Twitter, Twitch, 4chan, etc.) because it might be a lot of work to do a broader examination of online commenting. – Eden 1 year ago
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  • If the comments are very/all negative, then you absolutely must disable them. Of course, if the content is disturbing or shouldn't be seen and it causes public outrage, then disabling them seems redundant. However, for something innocent or religious, disabling comments would definitely be necessary. – OkaNaimo0819 1 year ago
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  • Interesting topic! You could possibly explore reasons why disabling comments would be appropriate or argue that it is never appropriate depending on your stance. – Dena Elerian 1 year ago
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The Central Role of Inspector Javert in Les Miserables

Les Miserables passim has themes of reform, personal development and redemption. These premises are contained within the character of the protagonist Jean Valjean, particularly after his theft and forgiveness therein of his theft of a silver candlestick holder.

These themes however are much more prevalent in Inspector Javert. He has an ultimate moral quandary expressed in his pursuit of the criminal Valjean. He held a virulent belief that the law was the correct course of action. His observations of Valjean’s deportment clashed with his fundamental beliefs on the law. This creates the quandary. Since he could not resolve the quandary, he committed suicide toward the denouement.

Analyze Javert’s thoughts, actions, et alii in his pursuit of Valjean and how it advances the themes and aims of the literature, and ultimately its plot and thesis. An example of a key moment would be where Javert interacts with Valjean as mayor, when Valjean has another identity.

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    Books Without Blessings: The Watch and Discworld

    The recent BBC America production, The Watch, has received polarized reactions. It is inspired by characters from Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld book series, though it does not claim to be a direct adaptation. If one alienates the people who are already self-proclaimed fans of a certain work, where can one go from there? How important is the original author’s or family estate’s approval of an adaptation for a TV show or movie to be considered successful? Sometimes deviations allow for greater artistic license, but it can come at the cost of bearing little resemblance to the original source material and turning off the already-established fanbase. Alternatively, when sticking closely to the source material, it can attract a large number of people who are already invested in the characters and storylines but may also lead to sanitization and excessive caution in an effort to preserve the work’s and the author’s existent legacy. There are also legal issues to be considered here. Sometimes the difference can be a result of ownership (or lack thereof) of the author’s estate/works. One could examine The Watch’s resemblance and departure from the Discworld series and/or other similar ventures and their outcomes.

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      The Tug-Of-War In Video Game Remasters/Remakes Between Preserving The Original Release's Atmosphere And Crafting A More Detailed World

      With the launch of the PlayStation 5 also came that of Demon’s Souls, the remake of the 2009 PlayStation 3 original to be precise. Reviews have generally praised Bluepoint Games’ attempts at revamping the graphical assets to show off the PlayStation 5’s increased horsepower. But some critics also pointed out that in the process of updating the art design, Bluepoint also sacrificed a bit of the original’s feel and atmosphere, the increased detail depriving the art of the lack of clarity that lent the original its eerie tension.

      In light of these observations, it’d be fitting to have an article that takes a closer look at video game remakes/remasters, particularly the tug-of-war between updating assets that may not hold up well to scrutiny on more modern displays and preserving as much of the source material’s original atmosphere as feasible. Other examples of game re-releases that attracted scrutiny for their reinterpretations of the original art design, such as the Silent Hill HD Collection and BioShock: The Collection, can be mentioned and explored.

      The potential article’s main line of inquiry could be the following: Why is there an appeal in preserving a game’s ambiguous details—particularly those stemming from technical limitations on original hardware—in the face of visual touch-ups for remasters/remakes? In the case of games with eerie ambiances, for example, could such an appeal lie in wishing to preserve the uncanny valley and fear of the unknown (e.g. unclear details on characters and environments that heighten the fear of the unknown and make players fill in the blanks with their imagination)?

      • This is a great point! I also would mention The Resident Evil 2 and 3 remakes, which were from the ground up remakes of classic games. Bluepoint also made the Shadow of Colossus remake as well, which is another game worth discussing! – Sean Gadus 2 months ago
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      • Also, you want to make the difference between a remaster and remake clear. A remaster often refers to a game given new polish or update visuals for a port (example is Bioshock Collection or Ico/Shadow PS3 collection). Full on remakes are usually more like RE2, FF7, and Demon's Souls for PS5. – Sean Gadus 2 months ago
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      Is there an end for comedy animation industry?

      The 20th century and the era of World War were a peak for comedy animations (laughter animations), but nowadays mostly social issues makes the basic idea for the animation industry. Even those cartoons with full laughter (like Simpsons) are not considered as an alternative to the classic cartoons such as Tom and Jerry… Is there an end for comedy animation industry in 21st century?

      • Why does it have to end? Is the focus on how comedy animation might change to find a new audience and retain the old one? – Joseph Cernik 2 years ago
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      • I'd be interested to see how it has evolved, rather than an ending...no one is likely to stop demanding comedy - so it's likely to still be produced. – Andi 2 years ago
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      How does Doctor Who approach the concept of time travel?

      Doctor who features a time lord who can travel in time to anywhere he wants before it even happens.

      • As a Whovian, I'd love to read an article on how "Doctor Who" approaches time travel. It's almost mythologized in the show how the Doctor deals with the laws of time and time-travel and how it affects him and his companions. – angelacarmela96 3 months ago
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      • Nice; can you flesh the topic out a bit? For example, what approaches would you compare Dr. Who to? – Stephanie M. 1 week ago
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      Canned Laughter: A Critical Analysis

      A British scientist explained the function of canned laughter used in TV shows as, “adding laughter to a joke, increases the humour value, no matter how funny or unfunny the joke is.” I Love Lucy (starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, William Farley), originally released in 1951, used canned laughter. The Honeymooners (starring Jackie Gleason, Art Carney, Audrey Meadows), which was originally released in 1955 also used canned laughter.
      M*A*S*H (starring Alan Alda, Loretta Swit, Jamie Farr), which was originally released in 1972, had the creators of the series wanting no canned laughter which was rejected by CBS, although there are episodes where there was no canned laughter. In addition, it was agreed that in surgery, no laughter would be used. When M*A*S*H was released on DVD, the option was added to watch the series with and without canned laughter. One person who commented about watching the series without laughter in the background said, “Hearing each and every one of these words for the first time was a treat.”
      With COVID-19 eliminating fans from baseball and football stadiums, canned cheering and boos are used. This seems a derivative of canned laughter
      A critical analysis of canned laughter should address the following: 1) Does it add to or detract from a series, and; 2) Can there be an “artistic” way of evaluating when it seems too much or inappropriate from being just the right amount.

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        What Makes a Good Bottle Episode?

        A bottle episode refers to an episode of a T.V. show written to require only one or two sets, and only few non-regular cast members. These episodes are often the result of a dwindling production budget, or a pre-emptive cost-saving attempt.

        Some people view these as lazy, but bottle episodes often make for great television.
        An article on this could discuss specific examples of shows who have made successful bottle episodes, and how they have done so. Reasons could include great drama due to the restricted movement of characters. Or, many fan favourite bottle episodes are enjoyed because they showcase their characters in their truest form. The examples available are plenty, with famous shows like Friends, New Girl, or Community all having done them.

        The writer of this article could also use poorly received bottle episodes as a contrast, so long as they discuss why they were not successful.

        • Good topic! Bottle episodes are fascinating. I know a few good ones, especially from shows like The Twilight Zone (I'm a fan of some of the older stuff). You could even argue that certain shows or seasons are made up of bottle episodes. Once Upon a Time is my favorite example, especially the early seasons, because if you leave Storybrooke, something bad will happen. (Or, hold on, is that a bottle, or just a "closed circle?") Anyway, love the topic. – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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        • Is "The Fly" from Breaking Bad is another good example of a Bottle episode in a dramatic show. It was pretty polarizing when it was released but has some great acting from Brian Cranston and Aaron Paul. – Sean Gadus 2 weeks ago
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        Film

        Memory in Film: Mementos and Maneuvering Through the Past
        Memory in Film: Mementos and Maneuvering Through the Past
        A Portrayal Of Mexican Cinema
        Life’s Torments in Billy Wilder’s The Lost Weekend
        Disability and Narrative: an Analysis of On-screen Characters

        TV

        The Good Fight: The Real, The Plausible, and Donald Trump’s Legacy
        The Good Fight: The Real, The Plausible, and Donald Trump’s Legacy
        The Heartbreaking Symbolism of The Clone Helmet In Star Wars: The Clone Wars’s Final Episodes
        The Donald Show: Trump, Television, and Manufactured Reality
        The Portrayal of Feminism in Fleabag (2016)

        Animation

        Daria and the Clichéd   Representation of Teenagers
        Daria and the Clichéd Representation of Teenagers
        The Complex Lessons of Environmentally-Motivated Animation
        Story of Will Vinton and Laika Studios
        How Princesses of Color Have Improved the Disney Princess Narrative

        Anime

        Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt: Breaking the mold of classic feminism
        Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt: Breaking the mold of classic feminism
        Fafner in the Azure: Identity, Community, and Alienation
        Genkaku Azuma: Anatomy of a Tragic Villain
        Shiro’s Sexuality in Voltron: Legendary Defender

        Manga

        Elfen Lied’s Eugenic Underpinnings
        Elfen Lied’s Eugenic Underpinnings
        The Horrifying Appeal of Junji Ito
        One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
        Manga: How to Travel Between Dimensions

        Comics

        Monstress: World-Building With a Feminist Twist
        Monstress: World-Building With a Feminist Twist
        Why Has Batman’s Origin Remained So Iconic?
        Feminist Criticism of Society and Comic Books’ Past
        The Batman/Catwoman Wedding Is Supposed to Upset You

        Literature

        Books to Discover French Literature
        Books to Discover French Literature
        Historical Fiction: Understanding the Past Through Gould’s Book of Fish and Wanting
        Charlotte Turner Smith: Empowering Women with a Sonnet
        Roland Barthes: Love as a Language

        Arts

        Welcome to Night Vale: More Conservative Than It Seems
        Welcome to Night Vale: More Conservative Than It Seems
        Dragons: East versus West
        Social Realism, New Masses & Diego Rivera
        Indian Food: A Multicultural Enterprise

        Writing

        The Pillars of Outstanding Stories
        The Pillars of Outstanding Stories
        The Impact of Writing on Well-Being and Self-Development
        Riddles in Rhetoric: Learning from Bilbo and Gollum about Linguistic Segregation
        Susan Sontag and her love of photography