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Rise of the Villains: Is It Wrong To Love Them?

Especially with the change of villains after the 2000s, the history of cinema has gained many cult characters. Joker, Ozymandias, Magneto, Thanos, Bane, and more. These villains, whose sole purpose is not to destroy the world, as before, all have different motivations. All of them have different purposes. They are far from being an ordinary villain, thanks to their delicately written characters like the main character of the movie. For this reason, they have many viewers who see them right and love them. The best example might be the Vikings. Although they were bloody raiders, we had a great time watching them. So how right is it to enjoy it, to support the Joker, to love these villains who are essentially trying to harm? Or trying to break the society we live in?

  • Still. Out. Of. The. Scope. Of. The. Artifice. – T. Palomino 2 weeks ago
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What makes some superheroes more popular than others

Why is Ant-Man, despite being integral to the MCU, still considered a lesser-known superhero, with jokes being made about it as recently as Ant-Man and The Wasp: Quantumania? Why did Drax come out of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 the most popular Guardian, going up against the likable charm of Starlord and the reserved bad-boy archetype in Rocket Raccoon? Why is Iron Man, who was once considered a B-list superhero in Marvel comics, now the pillar for the MCU and Marvel heroes as a whole? Why are Batman and Spiderman *so* timeless, that they will likely continue to see adaptations long after we’re gone?

There’s an unmistakable draw to some superheroes. Captain America, a symbol of America in a time of strife, is now a symbol of the entire world. It’s interesting to look back on superheroes, someone six years ago might not be able to tell you who "Doctor Strange" was, but is now a household name. Writing, staying power, casting, exposure, and adaptation all likely carry some weight in explaining why some superheroes refuse to die, while some fade into obscurity. With the unimaginable popularity of superheroes in modern culture, it should be analyzed just what, and how many factors make certain characters so integral to our culture.

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    What are some reasons why Hallmark holiday movies are not widely acclaimed?

    There are several reasons why Hallmark holiday movies are considered “bad”. Explore some of the reasons. Discuss television vs streaming, secularism, commercializations of the holidays, budgets, appeal, genre limitations, reputation, etc.
    Delve into why some people enjoy and like that Hallmark holiday movies are ‘bad’. Why do they continue to make Hallmark holiday movies if they are not well received critically?

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      Why Space Jam Worked

      If we’re being honest with each other, the idea of throwing Michael Jordan together with the largely dying Looney Tunes franchise was a risky decision at best. And there wasn’t much of a precedent for a film like this either, as at the time blending animation with live-action wasn’t very common. So how did this film become a landmark of this blend of genres alongside films like Who Framed Roger Rabbit? This essay will discuss the attributes of Space Jam that made it such a success and revived the Looney Tunes franchise.

      • Hmmm, interesting. Maybe bring in a film like Who Framed Roger Rabbit as a point of contrast. – Stephanie M. 8 months ago
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      • I would suggest comparing the original Space Jam to the recent sequel/reboot/whatever that was. Did that one work as well as the first? Why or why not? – noahspud 8 months ago
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      • I just want to note that Michael Jordan was probably the most important athlete in the world/one of the top of 3 athletes across the world at the time of the making of Space Jam. So having Michael Jordan in the film was a huge selling point. – Sean Gadus 5 days ago
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      • Space Jam worked because at that time, pretty much any off-the-wall idea with MJ in it would have worked. – Montayj79 2 days ago
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      What can we learn from existential philosophy in today's epidemic climate?

      How do famous works of existential philosophy: particularly those published in the late 19th/early 20th century fit into the role of human extant today? Specifically to the younger generations that are experiencing a deep uncertainty and fear towards the future? This can be drawn from works by Hermann Hesse, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, etc.

      • This is an interesting topic. I do think history repeats itself and that there is a lot to learn from philosophy. Also, learning from how humanity survived other hardships and catastrophes is a good thing for people today as well. – birdienumnum17 3 years ago
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      • I also hope someone will write about this topic. But to me, the more interesting perspective is how older people feel about their value and relation to the society given that the pandemic hits them the hardest and there is a growing sense that we may scarify the old and weak so that we can reopen the society for younger people, who are eager to work and socialize. – ctshng 3 years ago
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      • "Existential" a word which I remember being confined to a more narrow understanding of specific writers, such as Camus or Nietezche, has now seemed to touch many things. As part of an essay addressing existentialism should be how it has been adapted and seems to pop up everywhere. – Joseph Cernik 2 years ago
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      The Pretender (1996–2000): Retrospective

      A look back at this series, the TV movies and ideas of how the story could have been concluded (include both official words and speculations).

      • What a classic series. I think it would be good to focus on how this show influenced others such as Dollhouse among others. – Joseph Manduke IV 8 years ago
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      Storytelling in Gaming

      Gaming in many ways is another medium that requires writers, and yet the approach to story telling in writing is unique and quite different as opposed to traditional storytelling via books. I propose an article that might entertain looking into the deeper facets of story and writing in the gaming industry and the unique approach that is taken in completing a script as opposed to traditional writing. Focus could be placed particularly on discussing the need for adaptability in characters, characterizing empathy and emotion within a character as we follow them while also playing as them, the duality of the protagonist and the gamer etc. which while coming naturally in traditional writing, have to be balanced against what is possible within the given game dynamics

      • Love the topic! May I suggest profiling Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery as part of the article? I'm an avid player and enjoy a lot of aspects of the game, including story. But I also find that the writing is somewhat lazy, and a lot of my fellow players complain that the story has dragged out way too long (because chapters aren't released every week, so there can be 2-3 weeks that you go without information and get a side quest instead). I think HM lends itself well to analysis. – Stephanie M. 2 years ago
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      • I mostly only play video games that have a story too it. I don't game much nowadays due to school, but I always like the first and second Bioshock games. Red dead redemption is good for this too. Just wanted to throw some games to consider. – AbeRamirez 2 years ago
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      • If I may, I think that The Last Of Us (part I and part II) could be interesting to analyze in such an article. (Interesting topic, by the way!) Indeed, Part I won numerous prizes and was, among others, acclaimed for the quality and emotional depth of its storytelling, while Part II deeply dived the fans, mostly because of its writing and narrative choices. (Such an analysis may be the theme of an entire article, but perhaps the subject could still be evoked in the article related to the current topic!) – Gavroche 2 years ago
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      The ethics of documentaries and films and tv series based on true stories

      For many people, true stories are far more compelling than fiction and so there is an ever growing market for documentaires and tv series based on true stories. However, there are some ethical considerations that need to be taken into account.

      Firstly, when filming documentaires, do producers have an obligation to represent information as wholly and accurately as possible? We can see the simple of nature documentaries wherein the lion eats the zebra, but the event can be seen as either a victory or a defeat depending on whether the documentary focuses ont the lion or the zebra. Do those who make documentaries have a responsibility to represent both perspectives?

      Secondly, what kind of obligations should be held in regards to the subject of a documentary or a film based on a true story? Especially in the case of a tragedy, it is possibly for filmmakers to take advantage of a person’s grief for the sake of the story.
      Finally, does the dramatisation of true stories in some way glorify the event? This is an especially pressing issue when it comes to films about serial killers, for example ted bundy when he was portrayed by Zac Efron, or Jeffrey Dahmer who was protrayed by Evan Peters. Following the release of Dahmer in particular, there have been complaints from the families of victims and a response from viewers that was shockingly unempathetic. Extremely wicked shockingly vile and evil even garnered fan girls for the serial killer Ted Bundy. Do dramatisations of tragedies create a warped discourse surrounding these tragedies?

      • This is a brilliant and relevant point. In the onslaught of "based on a true story" kind of entertainment, I think there should be requirements for creators to go through to green-light certain projects. An example is Dahmer's father never giving consent to release tapes or create any of the documentaries surrounding his son. Blonde is a great example of the fetishization of Marilyn Monroe's trauma to the point of fabricating traumatic events while using her name to push a narrative that is only tangentially related to her. They knew that if they created a fictional starlet as the vehicle for violating and violent sexual assault, people would be horrified and it would never be cleared. There is an ethical issue at the heart of this topic. It would be crucial to provide equal examples of when it's done right in honoring the topic and when its simply glorifies one side. – LadyAcademia 1 week ago
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      • This is still so relevant today. Every time I see a serial killer documentary or a series like Dahmer, it kind of annoys me. I wish people would stop glorifying these killers because every time they're released it only creates new crazed fans of these killers as seen in the aftermath of Dahmer. It also most definitely is disrespectful to the victims and their families who have actually have to live through these events and now have to relive them because of these fans. – farhana1102 1 week ago
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      • This is a great topic and can innovates many thinkings around ethical storytelling. I think it is important to give distinctions on documentary, film and TV series. For documentary, the producer is looking to approach the true story as close to reality as possible. Hence, it requires less drama and more objective view. For film and TV series, I think producers must respect every person who involved in the true story. That means they should not misinterpret and over glorify the evil. The script or screen writer is also important when discussing this topic. They also have the obligation to know the story thoroughly and not making the script sounds silly. – Eddie 3 days ago
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      Film

      “The Women” a Masterpiece of Troupe Subversion and Toxic Feminism
      “The Women” a Masterpiece of Troupe Subversion and Toxic Feminism
      Comedy: When the Jokes Go Too Far
      Disney, The Little Mermaid, and the Politics of “Woke” in a Polarized World
      Clerks, and the value of the “Downer Ending”

      TV

      Bridgerton’s Reimagining of Regency Society
      Bridgerton’s Reimagining of Regency Society
      How Stranger Things’ Most Important Licensed Songs Compliment Its Story
      The Mandalorian’s Response to the Western Genre
      Stranger Things: Mental Health and Bullying

      Animation

      Disney Heroines and Gaslighting
      Disney Heroines and Gaslighting
      Celebrating, Analyzing, and Resurrecting Fillmore!
      Nickelodeon, Disney, and the Story of Growing Up
      Ren & Stimpy’s History: 30 Years Later

      Anime

      Spirited Away as Social Criticism
      Spirited Away as Social Criticism
      The Legacies of the Atomic Bomb in Anime
      Anime Versus Cancel Culture
      Perfect Blue: A Genre Study

      Manga

      Marketing vs. Genre in Manga – How They Can Get Confused
      Marketing vs. Genre in Manga – How They Can Get Confused
      Elfen Lied’s Eugenic Underpinnings
      The Horrifying Appeal of Junji Ito
      One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics

      Comics

      Why Don’t Superheroes Change the World?
      Why Don’t Superheroes Change the World?
      Continuity and Connectivity in Comic Book Movies
      Comics in Education: Benefits and attitudes
      How Gwenpool Knows the Unknowable (And Can We Do the Same?)

      Literature

      Iago – The Perfect Villain
      Iago – The Perfect Villain
      YA Book Series That Never End
      Preservation, Insight and Growth Through Literary Modernizations
      BookTok Influencers and Their Impact on the Publishing Industry

      Arts

      Inside America’s Fascination with Witches
      Inside America’s Fascination with Witches
      The Mystery Behind the Influence of Instagram and The Popular Culture Industry
      “National Anthem” by Lana Del Rey as a Commentary on American Nationalism and Political Structures
      Are Immersive Exhibitions Ruining Art?

      Writing

      Writing About Place
      Writing About Place
      NaNoWriMo and the Art of Eating the Elephant
      Writing in Isolation during a global pandemic
      Fantasy Writing in the Age of Reason to Today