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Latest Topics

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Should books in schools still be challenged/banned?

Today’s generation is exposed to varying topics, thanks to social media. Now why should books entail to be censored? Yes, there are a few outliers that push an agenda but the spotlight is not on them. I am unsure as to what books are currently banned, but i believe there should be a new wave of books introduced into schools (perhaps separate topic). Maybe the "list" of what considers a book bad or extreme should be updated.

  • Censorship should not be taken lightly. It endangers the basic right of freedom of expression. Labeling books as good or bad is a subjective matter. Perhaps, the members of the generation should pick their own curriculum--individually. – purplelight71 3 months ago
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  • The American Library Association releases annual reports on the most frequently challenged or banned books in schools each year. In recent years, the most frequently banned books (often 5 of the top 10 titles) have dealt with LGBTQ+ topics, especially transgender. – JamesBKelley 3 months ago
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  • Perhaps the best way to promote any book is to ban it! We are always drawn to what we're told we can't have or is bad for us, even if only to satisfy our curiosity. – Amyus 3 months ago
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  • I went to a catholic french school from kindergarten to seventh grade. Everything was censored: books, movie rentals, computers, etc. We were basically in a tiny ignorant bubble full of white kids in a white neighborhood. Transitioning to a Public High School was such a big shock. We had kids from all over the city and so many things changed. All through primary there was one idea: God created everything. Then we were lead to believe that if someone was not catholic they would go to hell and we should not talk to them. I was so ignorant and going to High School and being in an environment that pushed me to think outside the box and challenge everything I had know made me into the person I am today. Plus I have learned so much from books such as To Kill a Mockingbird, 1981, Persepolis. Not so much Shakespeare, but I had a great English teacher who helped a lot. – sissid 3 months ago
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  • Relevant and timeless topic you have there. I'm the last person to push for book banning, having been a bookworm almost since the womb. My personal philosophy is that if you ban one, no book is safe. And yet, there are certain lines I won't cross in my personal reading--lines I wonder if authors and readers should be crossing. For instance, if a book is basically just pages of porn, shouldn't we say/do something about it? If a book is encouraging people to, I don't know, embrace the idea of modern day concentration camps, do we have a moral obligation to respond? It's definitely a lot to think about. – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
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  • I think this needs to are rewritten. I get the feeling there is some focus on a "new generation" of banned books as opposed to those that are perennial favorites to be banned. – Joseph Cernik 2 hours ago
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4

Akira: the anime full of anti-nuclear imagery

I go to a lot of conventions and I see so much Akira merchandise. Eventually I had to re-watch the anime because I hadn’t seen it since I was a small child.

Without watching super analytically, I noticed a lot of anti-war imagery. While this may not be a surprise, I feel that we may be glossing over some deep messages hidden within rhetoric and symbolism.

It deserves a deep analysis.

  • There are lots of articles out there about the A-bomb's influence on anime and manga that could help with an analysis. Lots of people have pointed to Akira as being an attempt to reckon with the events at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Although it doesn't have anything to do with anime, the book Life After Nagasaki is an amazing, in-depth look at both the events that transpired there as well as an investigation into the lives of several hibakusha (people who lived through the A-bomb and suffered injuries/radiation poisoning). – ees 3 months ago
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Is it Possible to develop a good "feel" for a TV show from the first few episodes?

It is possible to look back after the first season of a show and develop a feeling that it was a good show, or even after several seasons. But, when a show first appears on TV and all that exists are those first few episodes, maybe no more than the first two or three, then what type of opinions can develop about it? It is possible to talk about a "tipping point" what something starts to take off, but here, at the beginning, the tipping point might not yet have been reached. Early on character development, character interaction, plots, story lines might be seen in different ways then might be the case after the show has been on for a longer period. When a show has been on for a season or more, the audience has more of a history to draw upon in how they see character interaction and plots develop, that is not there with only a few episodes. Those first few episodes can begin to lay the foundation for what is to come and, perhaps, it is how the audience speculates about where they think the show and its characters might be headed that matters in determining if viewers see a show as having the potential to be a good show.

  • This is definitely an interesting topic! And definitely something that would be interesting to look at. It would be interesting to talk about the difference between shows that try too hard and those that bring you in slowly. – ChaosMistress5817 2 days ago
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Can Anxiety Be Cured with Creativity

I think everyone has suffered from anxiety at some point in their lives. Whether it’s gut-wrenching anxiety with extreme mind fog or worrying about present/future events. Being a writer, I understand exactly what it’s like to have several things pulling me in different directions, in a single day. I want to write, I have creative ideas, I’ve gotta find leads, family, friends, exercise and all of the other things, I need to do to "adult".

What if I could tame the beast with creativity. The ability to transmute anxiety from one container and articulate it into a creative container. Creativity comes in numerous forms, whether you’re cooking your favourite dish, writing blog posts or even arranging flowers in your garden. Practicing a creative cycle weekly has proven to lower stress levels and I think it would be an interesting topic in a day and age, where anxiety is at such a high.

  • I think this is a great topic! The only thing is that anxiety can often prevent individuals from being creative. Even though I don't think that anxiety can necessarily be cured with creativity, I definitely agree that finding treatment options that help revitalize creativity will certainly help ease the burden of anxiety. – Kurlehh 2 months ago
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  • I agree with Kurlehh, and I think that if somebody writes this article they should focus on how well anxiety could be "treated" with creativity. – Indigo 2 months ago
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  • Instead of the word "cure" maybe "manage" is more appropriate in describing how anxiety can be handled? Maybe the topic could be broadened into what exactly is anxiety, how to recognize it, and how to go about handling it with creative pursuits; how anxiety can be a force for productivity and accomplishments. – chloet2 2 months ago
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  • Things about how creativity could be motivated or created and through that you can judge about anxiety and how it can be treated – Rusi 2 months ago
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  • "Practicing a creative cycle" I think needs to be rewritten, it's not clear what that means. But what motivates creativity is a good idea. – Joseph Cernik 12 hours ago
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  • I definitely agree with the people above. I suffer from GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) and while creativity can help me a ton, there are some days where it is so bad that I can't bring myself to be creative in any way. I think creativity is more of an outlet than a cure. While sometimes I certainly do feel recharged and elated when I get my creativity flowing, the anxiety disorder itself is still there. This is great topic, insightful points can be made. This is just a topic that I feel needs to be addressed from all kinds of perspectives! – Megan Taylor 11 hours ago
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Is it possible to like Gone With The Wind while still realizing the often Mythic Image of the South it Presents?

Gone With The Wind (1939) can be seen as a good movie. But, at the same time, it presents an image of the South which was never true in the first place and which presents slavery in almost passing reference ways. There is this time before the Civil War where, we are to believe, that the South had an ideal existence. Seeing the movie from the present, makes one quite aware of what is left out and glossed over and makes one want to go "Wait! Stop! Go back!" How can we and should evaluate the movie today?

  • It is important as always to remember the framework of literature, that it is a fiction and GWTW was always framed as a historical romance that drew on some elements of the civil war, but largely was about the journey of Scarlet O'Hara through a changing period. It is a story about the dangers of unrequited love and unrealistic ideals, but also about strength and resolution. In many ways the representation of slavery in the film/book needs to be balanced against the fact it is told from the perspective of a woman in that period, most of which had the same rights of slaves in the time. Scarlet is also an unreliable narrator as she perceives the events around her from a very self-centered lens. However, all in all it is still an interesting text to discuss. – SaraiMW 4 days ago
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Why movie adaptations of video games are always expected to fail and what can be done to amend this

analyse the current trend of video game to movie adaptations and why they fail to perform in the box office; also make suggestions on what could be done to improve future adaptations.

  • I will note that not all are "expected to fail," but that yes with the failure of many there has become an overwhelming sense of despair in relation to this. To deal with this discussion the concept of "failure" will need to be outlined, as since films like Tomb Raider were not financial or popular failures, but many game players felt it was (as did many feminists but for different reasons). Also films such as the Resident Evil series are categorically not failures. So part of the discussion would include what the success stories are and what made them different to the other obvious failures such as - Warcraft, Assassin's Creed, The Angry Bird's Movie (although seriously!!!) – SaraiMW 4 days ago
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  • To further add to this, it might be worth going back a few years when video games were just starting to become mainstream and adaptations of various games were starting become the norm – AidanGuagliardo 4 days ago
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Fate, Love, and Development in Re:Zero

Many people seem to have dropped Re:Zero due to hating the protagonist, Natsuki Subaru. He is overly headstrong, impulsive, selfish, and powerless – not the most common traits of a protagonist in action anime. But what people hate about Subaru the most is his greatest triumph of the anime, that is overcoming his pride and knowing when to ask to help and rely on others. He literally feels like a protagonist of his own game and even references his chronic reincarnation as returning to a "save point", and it takes him until the tail end of the series and much suffering and death to come around, past the point that many deemed him insufferable and stopped watching. Exploring and analyzing Subaru’s character and the show’s themes, along with a second analysis of the anime’s effectiveness in conveying its messages, would be interesting to see in either justifying premature stoppage, or urging people to "suffer" through his journey.

  • I'm interested to write about psychological anime. I'm picking this topic as my first article on The Artifice! – MC07 2 months ago
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BOTW In Today's Scope of RPG's

The Legend of Zelda is a game series that many of us cherish dearly as gamers. However, when the previous Zelda games came out it seems as if they were all ahead of their time (Ocarina of Time, the Wind Waker). This doesn’t seem to be the case now. Although BOTW is a great game, it seems to borrow pieces from other recent RPG’s: such as Skyrim and the Witcher 3. Do we as a community think that this is Nintendo giving a nod to these other great games, or are they falling behind in the RPG community?

  • I think it's a sign that fresh blood is entering Nintendo. People who have played these other games and RPGs. By understanding and improving on the mechanics and systems from games in the wider marketplace, Nintendo has been able to polish BOTW to perfection. Although, this could be seen as "falling behind", I think this is proof of Nintendo changing in some ways. For better or for worse, it's hard to tell yet. – Dimitri 3 months ago
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Film

Darth Maul: A Triumph of the Star Wars Extended Universe
Darth Maul: A Triumph of the Star Wars Extended Universe
The Dark Side of Romance in Movies
Infinity War: Consequences and The Times In Between
Mean Girls, Social Media and Adolescent Body Image

TV

Why do the Women of Game of Thrones Suffer So Much?
Why do the Women of Game of Thrones Suffer So Much?
Brooklyn Nine Nine: The Importance of a Diverse Show & Characters
The Sexual on TV News: Lipstick Matters
The Black Death and Sensationalized Medieval History

Animation

Moana: A Disney Princess For The 21st Century
Moana: A Disney Princess For The 21st Century
Isle of Dogs: Humanity in the Inhuman
The 21st Century’s Most Meaningful Animated Shorts
Samurai Jack: Exploring the Newfound Maturity

Anime

Queer Representation in Anime
Queer Representation in Anime
Is Sailor Moon a feminist icon?
Are you a Sub or a Dub?
An Isao Takahata Retrospective

Manga

One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
One Punch Man vs. My Hero Academia: Reconstructing the Silver Age of Comics
Manga: How to Travel Between Dimensions
Naruto: The Unresolved Revolution
The 5 Saddest Moments in One Piece

Comics

Comic Books, Adults, and a History of Stigmatization
Comic Books, Adults, and a History of Stigmatization
The Social Stigma of Comic Book Reading
What Should Happen To Captured Super Villains?
Finding the Bridge Between Superhero Comics and Hip-Hop

Literature

YA Novels and their Modern Leading Ladies
YA Novels and their Modern Leading Ladies
Bad Boys, Bad Boys: The Persistent Presence of the Byronic Hero
Audiobooks: Do they Enhance or Diminish the Enjoyment of a Story?
Lessons from Our Favorite and Least Favorite Fictional Teachers

Arts

This is America: Exploring Lyrical and Visual Symbolism
This is America: Exploring Lyrical and Visual Symbolism
The Power of Social Media; Does It Enhance or Swallow Up Relationships?
Perfecting the Martial Art
The Truth About Cats and Artists

Writing

Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak
Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak
Parallel and Alternate Realities; Fiction Tells us the Difference
Genre Fiction in University Writing Programs: No longer the MFA’s Red-headed Stepchild
Can you Teach Someone how to Become a Writer?