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"Anne With An E" - Elucidating emotional realism and compassion

Some parents feel that Netflix’s Original series "Anne With An E," a remake of Montgomery’s beloved "Anne of Green Gables," goes too far in introducing topics such as child abuse, neglect, bullying, and sex to a family audience. Others feel it is an amazing and beautiful handling of these topics, teaching compassion and consideration even in a dark world. How does discussing difficult emotion promote or prevent healing and understanding?

  • J'adore your topic! :) – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
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  • Thanks! :) – CLHale 2 months ago
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The message that George RR Martin is trying to send with Game of Thrones

Analyze and discuss what greater meaning there is in Game of Thrones, an overarching message that Martin is trying to send to his readers (and viewers I guess) beyond the amazing fantasy, political intrigue, and gut-wrenching battles and deaths that has enraptured most of the fan base.

  • An interesting idea for a topic, especially since Hillary Clinton appears to identify with the Cersei Lannister/Baratheon character. Real life copying art? – Amyus 1 week ago
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  • Something can be said for the unabashed yet tactical killing off of characters in the series, and what relevance this has in contemporary television's trends in dependency on viewer/fan preferences/reactions. – LNwenwu 4 days ago
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  • I think it would also be helpful to analyze, or critique, i would say, his methods for promoting messages. The amount of gross sexual content in the series, for instance...is this fanservice? Necessary to the plot? What are his ways of getting his views across to others? – EricJohnson 3 days ago
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Red Dwarf - Growing old disgracefully in Space.

The British science fiction comedy TV series ‘Red Dwarf’ (1988-1999)(2009-Present) has gained a cult status and follows the misadventures of what are essentially four less than intrepid blokes stuck in Space. With the main characters frequently exhibiting flaws such as cowardice, laziness and downright incompetence, the stories provide a welcome, humorous antidote to the morally upright characters typically found in many science fiction series. The latest series is due to appear in October 2017 and the fact that the lead actors are no longer the spring chickens they once were has not gone unnoticed by the show’s main writer, Doug Naylor, who has already started to include jokes at the expense of his ageing characters. Could this perhaps lead to the birth of a new comedy genre that would playfully examine the inevitable encroachment of advancing years and a second childhood in a Sci-Fi setting?

  • This is an interesting point. One of the newest trends emerging out of the UK has been the changing focus of target audience age groups. One of the best examples of this has been 'Dr Who' with the return to an older doctor with both Peter Capaldi and Jodie Whittaker. In many ways this is a logical choice as the aging baby boomers are still the largest generation and are now progressing into a period of having greater disposable incomes and time, it makes sense then that there is a return to nostalgic childhood, but explored through the aging "grey" actors. – SaraiMW 6 days ago
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The Women of The Bold Type

The first season of The Bold Type just concluded and it has received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and viewers alike. For a show predicated on the lives of three young women – Jane, Sutton, and Kat – working at a women’s magazine, the writers could have easily made its characters vapid and its plot shallow or overly predictable, or pit the three females together in competition with each other. Instead, these women each occupy their own department within the magazine and only ever try to support each other as they navigate their love lives, sexuality, jobs, and identities.
Analyze the diversity of The Bold Type’s major female characters (Jane, Sutton, Kat, but even Jacqueline and Adena are useful for this discussion): their strengths, faults, and growth throughout the season. How does the characterization of these women, and the obstacles they must overcome, contribute to the show’s overarching theme of female empowerment?

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    Will cable TV die in the next 10 or more years?

    With the advent of online streaming services, is the television platform nearing its end? If so, how much longer can the platform last? If this topic was picked, the writer could research evidence leading to the conclusion that TV will die out soon or if it still has many years left to go.

    • I think that is a very strong possibility. – AGMacdonald 3 weeks ago
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    • There's been speculation that this could happen--but only if there are not so many competitors for streaming. With Twitter and Facebook livestreams, each channel (and Disney) getting their "go" on, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and Netflix completing with content, and so on, customers may be disgusted and just pirate, or have large groups to share the services. – IndiLeigh 3 weeks ago
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    Taken by John Wilson (PM) 2 weeks ago.
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    CW's "The 100" and Moral Relativity

    "The 100" has become known for its morally gray characters. In the TV show, warring clans often use the justification "[insert devastating action] was done for my people." However, "The 100’s" stance is not so clear cut. Discuss the TV show’s portrayal of moral relativism. Does "The 100" agree with the justifications characters provide for their actions (i.e. committing genocide "for [their] people")? Or does it want viewers to challenge the ideologies behind the "heroes" behavior? What evidence contributes to your conclusion, whether it be cinematography, symbolism, plot parallels, etc?

    • Almost all characters have their "gray" moments, but Marcus Kane's season 1 arc was very important in defining the show for me. – IndiLeigh 3 weeks ago
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    The Evolution of Tim Allen as a Dad

    In the 1990s, Tim Allen starred in Home Improvement as Tim Taylor, wherein he raised his three sons Mark, Brad, and Randy with wife Jill. Around 2010, Tim returned to the dad role, this time as Mike Baxter on Last Man Standing. As Mike, he raises and supports three daughters, Kristin, Mandy, and Eve, with wife Vanessa.

    The two shows are both great and bring to mind several questions. For instance, how is Tim Taylor, who raises sons, different in personality and approach from Mike Baxter, who raises daughters? Are they alike at all? Do the ages of the children make a difference–Baxter’s daughters are pretty much grown up, and one is a mother (Eve, the youngest, is in high school. Taylor’s sons were middle and elementary schoolers when Home Improvement began and age more slowly). Which character, if either, is the more realistic TV dad, or the better one? The better/more realistic husband? What does each show have to say about raising single-gender families?

    • I am so psyched to read this future post. – Emily Esten 3 weeks ago
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    • Thanks, Emily. I considered writing it myself, but I haven't watched enough Home Improvement to make any definitive calls. I am, however, a Last Man Standing fan. – Stephanie M. 3 weeks ago
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    Advertising and the Art of Selling...Stuff.

    The world of TV Advertising has become ever more sophisticated and devious as the public has become more media-savvy. From the early days of a product being pushed in front of us and a cheery female voice or a man in a white coat suggesting we buy it, we’ve moved on – through an era of dancing bunnies high on battery power and roller skating young women extolling the virtues of certain feminine sanitary products, to a period when the product was rarely seen on screen and we were bombarded with imagery that seemed to bare no relation to the product being advertised. These days some TV adverts are like mini movies whilst others are projected deep into our subconscious and intended to make us feel slightly inadequate if we don’t continue to play the consumer game.

    However, is the advert break still a convenient excuse to nip to the loo or make a cup of tea? Is the Scientist in the white coat still regarded as an authority figure? Are we, the viewing public, too wise for our own good? Can we still be tricked into buying something we really don’t need and, most likely, will become obsolete within a year? The artifice of advertising will always remain exactly that and yet there have been advertising campaigns that have gained a life of their own and even garnered artistic respect and admiration. Could advertising truly be considered an artform in itself?

    • Is advertising an art form? Yes; it requires creativity and finesse just like film, novel writing, and other similar pursuits. But what kind of art form is it? That's the perennial question, because as you mention, advertising is designed to push people into acquiring "stuff." Can we still be "tricked?" Oh, yes...but I think that raises the question, do we even care we're being tricked anymore? Or would we rather just enjoy a cleverly conceived commercial (or ten)? – Stephanie M. 3 weeks ago
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    • any discussion of advertising should necessarily reference Edward Bernays, one of the original admen who wrote on advertising and PR campaigns as having the ability to manufacture consent and control the "masses." Also an important scholars to reference and read would be Naomi Klein, who literally wrote the book on the evolution of the advertising agency and the rise of branding, "No Logo." – Jonathan Judd 3 weeks ago
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