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Isekai and its Pervasiveness in Anime

From Digimon to That Time I got Reincarnated as a Slime, isekai is a genre of anime that holds a lot of staying power in the industry. The topic taker should research:

The beginning of the genre

What made it popular

Its impact on the anime industry

Is the animation of isekai not to the same standard of other anime, or just drawn in simpler styles? Does the numerous amounts of isekai better or worsen working conditions for anime artists?

What genres do isekai cross over with?

Why is isekai so popular?

Are there too many isekai?

Will isekai bring about new genres of anime?

By researching these aspects of isekai, the topic taker should be able to get a full picture of the how, what, and why of isekai. The topic taker is, as always, free to do more research on isekai, such as whether or not isekai helps its viewers by increasing positivity in their mood, help them relax from the stressors in life, and so on.

Research links to get the topic taker started:

(link)

(link)

(link)

(link) mainstream popularity of Isekai,fear of what’s after death.

  • I'd add some description to the links. – Sunni Rashad 4 weeks ago
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  • The first link is to a Wikipedia page to help define what isekai is, in case the topic taker is not familiar with the term. The second link goes into popular types of sub-genres for isekai. The third link is to a Reddit post that asks why you could perhaps neglect to mention that the main character is from another world and it wouldn't change anything about the story that's important to the plot. The fourth link discusses why isekai is so popular in anime. – Siothrún 3 weeks ago
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Taken by kelval34 (PM) 6 days ago.
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2000s Anime and its Theme of Justice

The 2000s had quite a few anime that dealt with what it means to "become" justice, in a sense. Fate Stay Night has a protagonist who tries to fight for his sense of justice. Claymore examines the topic in a more brutal way that also deals with what it means to be human, and, of course, Death Note and Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion both examine what would happen if their protagonists were given a means to end the wrongs of the world in which they live, only to pay a price for it later.

The topic taker should examine each of the anime listed, if possible, and compare and contrast how each anime dealt with the theme of justice it wanted to convey. How did each anime handle the toll it took on its protagonist? What could be gleaned from the outcomes of the individual anime surrounding what it means to be a savior figure, even if that ideology is subjective?

Furthermore, the topic taker should delve into whether or not the sense of justice being displayed is entirely subjective to the protagonist of the anime, or if it tackles the idea of objective justice and the toll that takes on groups as opposed to the individual. The topic taker can include other anime that they feel may fit this idea, so long as it was released between 2000-2009, as there seemed to be a trend with anime around that time that shared a certain thematic work and aesthetic which is to be examined in this topic specifically. In this regard, the topic taker could also deepen the topic by looking into what was going on in Japan and/or the world in general at the time to see if current events or recent history evoked the theme of justice being culturally relevant to its viewers. The topic taker may also include, briefly, how anime from the 2000s with this theme of justice may have influenced other anime to re-examine the themes later on, such as with 2012’s Psycho-Pass or more current day anime.

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    Anime Tropes that Repel Viewers

    A look at a few anime tropes that might make the genre inaccessible for newcomers and ones give the genre the reputation of being for teens and adolescents. Are there good examples of Anime that avoid these tropes, or anime that subvert the tropes?

    • Fantastic topic because I think it opens up discussion about what preconceptions about anime newcomers often find to be true through repetition of these tropes and how they are avoided. – AdilYoosuf 7 years ago
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    • I agree with AdilYoosuf, though I have to admit to having a bias in favour of anime as a storytelling medium. I've often found that when trying to explain the reasons why I enjoyed the Haruhi Suzumiya anime series and film (subtitled not dubbed) that as soon as I mention the words 'teenager' and 'school' the shutters descend. I think one of the problems is that westerners in particular tend to have grown up watching cartoons on TV so presume anime is no different and won't give it a chance. As for good examples that subvert, or even invert, tropes then I would have to suggest Satoshi Kon's excellent series 'Paranoia Agent' and Kyoto Animation's 'The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya' (to name but a few) as both subvert genres and tropes whilst demanding the viewer thinks for him/herself. Anyway, you have my approval for your suggested topic. – Amyus 7 years ago
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    The usage of body horror to create a sense of horror in Parasyte: The Maxim

    Analyze the ways in which the 2014 anime, Parasyte: The Maxim uses body horror to elicit a feeling of terror by analyzing body horror as a genre of fiction and an art style. Delve into the artwork of Junji Ito and H. R. Giger, cataloging techniques and defining terms, all to show how Parasyte is a product of a body horror genre.

    • What about also comparing to Junji Ito's works? He is most famous for his tackling of body horror? – Beatrix Kondo 1 year ago
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    Did Boruto "kill" Naruto? - The Impact of Boruto on the Narutoverse: Exploring the Evolution and Continuity

    As a writer, it is important to delve into the theme of how Boruto has impacted the Narutoverse and what aspects should be explored. Here are some key points to consider:

    Evolution of the Narrative: Analyze how the introduction of Boruto as a sequel series has brought new dimensions to the Narutoverse. Explore the ways in which the storyline, characters, and overall world have evolved to reflect the passage of time and the changing dynamics of the ninja world.

    Character Development: Examine the growth and development of familiar characters from the Naruto series within the context of Boruto. Explore how their experiences and relationships have evolved, and the impact this has had on their individual story arcs and the overarching narrative.

    Intergenerational Conflict: Investigate the conflicts and tensions that arise between the older generation of characters from Naruto and the new generation represented by Boruto. Explore the clash of ideals, values, and perspectives, and how this dynamic shapes the narrative and drives character growth.

    Continuity and Legacy: Explore how Boruto maintains continuity with the Narutoverse while forging its own path. Examine the ways in which the series pays homage to its predecessor and honors the legacy of Naruto, while also introducing new elements and expanding the lore of the ninja world.

    Impact on Fanbase: Analyze the reception and impact of Boruto within the Naruto fanbase. Explore how fans have responded to the new series, the strengths and weaknesses identified, and the ways in which it has contributed to the ongoing enthusiasm for the Narutoverse.

    By exploring these aspects, the writer can navigate the theme of Boruto’s impact on the Narutoverse and delve into the intricacies of its narrative, character development, and fan reception. It is crucial to strike a balance between honoring the original series while allowing the new generation to carve its own path, creating a cohesive and engaging continuation of the beloved Naruto universe.

      Taken by Siothrún (PM) 1 month ago.
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      Anime Goes AI: The Pros and Cons of Automating the Animation Industry

      The future of anime may seem promising with the use of artificial intelligence, but it comes with its own set of challenges. Recent articles have been exploring the pros and cons of automating the animation industry. On the positive side, AI can reduce the time and cost required to create anime, while also improving the quality of the final product. However, the downside is that these tools can potentially erase people’s jobs. Many animators already fear that their jobs are at risk when AI is involved. Additionally, the lack of jobs in the field may lead to less diversity and creativity in anime productions. It’s imperative to weigh the good, the bad, and the ugly of AI in the anime industry and find ways to use this technology fairly and efficiently.

      • This is a very interesting article and one that is hard to take a firm stance on. I can see why Corridor would want to 'democratise' animation since they require large teams and a lot of money. It would be interesting to see the variety of storytelling that would be available (though the downside to anybody being able to make their own animation is that ANYONE can make their own animation). On the flip side, you are taking jobs from professional animators. It would be fascinating to explore if there is a place for both (perhaps AI can assist in independent material, which would never otherwise be made, while animators' jobs are protected in the future). Excellent topic. – A G Macdonald 1 year ago
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      Itachi Uchiha: Villain Or Tragic Hero?

      Analyze what makes Itachi Uchiha, from Naruto, a villain or a tragic hero (based on the Greek archetype of tragic heroes).
      He was responsible for the massacre of his family, even if for noble reasons. A pacifist, a prodigy, who caused lots of pain.
      Contrary to villains, however, his motivations were pure, and he led a miserable life, maculated by his choices.
      Compare him to either Batman or a "darker" or tragic hero, as opposed to a villain or even an anti-hero.

      • Example: Due to his noble birth and good character, Macbeth is a tragic hero in the traditional sense. But his ambition — his deadly flaw — causes his demise at the play's conclusion. As he sinks farther and further into the shadows, it also drives him to commit several crimes, including murder. He embodies the archetype of the tragic hero, despite some of his characteristics falling short of perfection. – Beatrix Kondo 1 year ago
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      • Itachi Uchiha reminds me of another tragic hero, Cassius au Bellona from Red Rising. – Morgan Tracy 7 months ago
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      Gender Representation In Yu-Gi-Oh!

      Yu-Gi-Oh! is a long-running franchise encompassing anime, manga, video games, and trading card games. Between 2000 and 2019, six Yu-Gi-Oh! anime series were produced by Studio Gallop, each focusing on a different cast of characters, setting, and even genre. Although each Yu-Gi-Oh! series offers a distinct story, all six of these anime have received criticism from both fans and critics for their portrayals of female characters. All six Yu-Gi-Oh! anime are centred primarily on male characters, and the few girls and women that appear in the stories are commonly sidelined if not cast into harmful gender stereotypes. From my research, most analyses of gender representation in Yu-Gi-Oh! discuss these problems, but I think there is also scope to analyse how Yu-Gi-Oh!’s problematic depictions of female characters contrasts with its representation of male characters. Despite its marginalisation of female characters, Yu-Gi-Oh! presents a surprisingly non-toxic portrayal of masculinity, in which male characters are allowed to talk about their feelings, show friendly affection for one another, and resolve conflicts without resorting to violence. The proposed article would unpack how Yu-Gi-Oh! offers both reductive and progressive representations of gender and how these representations create contradictory messages for the audience.

      • There is also a lot to be said of the various difference between the English dub of the characters and the Japanese versions. From what I understand, characters had motivations removed by the 4kids dubbing company, so analysis through a cultural lens could be a valuable aspect to add. – Sunni Ago 1 year ago
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      • Agreed on the prior point that the dubs would remove the motivations of the characters. That's most definitely why we would end up with a character like Akiza who started out abused, fearful of her own power, and manipulated by a close confidant. She seemed like she was going to be the strong female character that Yu-gi-oh couldve had in Tea and Alexis but she just ended up being someone who worked off of love for yusei rather than moving forward for herself. – JA1 1 year ago
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      • I think gender representation in older anime reflect the time period in which they were made. For example, in Naruto, we don't see any strong female characters until 83 episodes into in the show. Until the appearance of Tsunade in that episode, there are no women portrayed as strong or independent. Even then, when Tsunade is introduced, she is drawn with exaggerated breasts. – Morgan Tracy 7 months ago
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