Amyus

Amyus

A struggling actor, writer, bibliophile, self-confessed coffee addict, lover of European and Oriental Cinema, confirmed bachelor and wannabe blues guitarist.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Pending

    Extras: The Unsung Heroes of Film and Television

    From the unfortunate Stormtrooper who banged his head on a door in ‘Star Wars – A New Hope’ (1977), to the brave souls who survived the ‘Helm’s Deep’, three months of night shoots in ‘Lord of The Rings. The Two Towers’ (2002), the Support Actor or Extra is a vital element of film making, but often overlooked by the cinema going public. These days ‘extras’ are big business, with a myriad of agencies offering almost any size, shape and range of looks that any production may require. Yet it’s not often that these loyal and hard working bodies even receive an end titles credit. The British sitcom ‘Extras’ (2005-2007), attempted the redress the balance, but still focused on the improbable rise to fame of the lead character. Perhaps it’s time that our unsung heroes of film and television were recognised and rewarded for their professional skills and dedication to the art. An Oscar or similar for ‘Best Featured Extra’ perhaps?

    • I can't wait to see what you do with this topic. :) – Stephanie M. 2 days ago
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    • I'm tempted, Stephanie, but I fear that as an insider my views would be biased. I've had a few minor roles where lines were cut so I didn't get the eagerly anticipated credit, but I continue to slog on regardless. So, I put this topic forward to see if an interested yet unconnected party might like to delve into the fascinating world of the Extra. Ahh, we are such stuff as dreams are made on....and 10 points to anyone who can complete the quote! :) – Amyus 2 days ago
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    The Role of the Sacrificial Hero in Cinema

    From Jean Reno’s portrayal of Léon (Léon. AKA: The Professional. 1994) to Shin Hyeon-jun’s portrayal of Hyun-jun (Kiss Me, Kill Me. 2009), the Hitman who rediscovers his humanity through self-sacrifice and atonement is a familiar theme. Are these characters merely bad men turned good or do they represent a convenient scapegoat for the ills of Society in general? Perhaps more importantly, do we learn anything from them as anti-heroes or damaged role models?

    • Definitely worth considering whether we are escaping moral dilemmas by having the troubled men die instead of having to deal with them afterward. – IndiLeigh 2 months ago
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    • A very interesting topic. I feel like this is a trope that we as a society have taken for granted. An in-depth look at the moral implications of this kind of narrative would be a fascinating read. – SophieCherry 2 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Amyus

    Nakia Guinn. Thanks for your feedback. I’m always trying to encourage people to give ‘Haruhi’ a go. It may not be that current, in the present anime climate, but it’s still has a lot to offer.

    Oh, and by the way – what a great name you have!

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    Kyle. Thank you for appreciating my article. Yes, there will be more to come. 🙂

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    Rubye Hostetler. Thank you very much and I hope your FB friends will enjoy this as much as you have. It’s always good for any writer to know their work is appreciated.

    The overall responses have been fantastic and far better than I had hoped for. I’m just pleased to have struck a chord with so many Haruhi fans and been able to demonstrate that there is so much to the Haruhi world than appears on the screen.

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    A fascinating article and a damned good read. Thank you. Thanks also for confirming my suspicions that the ‘c-beams’ mentioned by Roy in ‘Blade Runner’ were indeed Caesium beams. I’m glad to see that you didn’t get bogged down in the ‘Grandfather Paradox’, so beloved by some writers. A much over explored idea, in my opinion. I liked how you have drawn from a wide variety of sources. This helped to keep me interested and keen to read the whole article. Thank you for your time, research and effort.

    Time Travel: The Literary Way To Wander
    Amyus

    Blossom Jacks. Thank you, your comments are well received and appreciated. Yes, this article is an extract from a much longer analysis so I do intend to delve a lot deeper into the crazy world of Haruhi Suzumiya. There are so many themes explored in the saga, some overlapping each other, some influencing each other and some that appear to be completely disconnected (at first) that it’s taken me a year of reading and rereading the novels, manga and re-watching the anime (taking copious notes as I go) just to nail down some of the more obvious themes. There are so many literary references that I have barely touched on that aspect with this article. I am now working on an article about Yuki.

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    Bo Kee. And thank you in return for your praise. Much appreciated.

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    McCutcheon. Cheers. Make mine a Kenya AA, black, medium strong and no sugar. 🙂

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero
    Amyus

    Perrin. Agreed. Although I still defer to the original Japanese voice cast, I think the ‘English’ dubbed versions had an excellent voice cast. I also like the way that KyoAni doesn’t just animate the foreground and there’s always something going on in the background. It brings a great sense of depth to a scene.

    The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya: The Journey of The Hero