Eden

Eden

Hi! I'm Eden. Talk anime to me. You can find me living under a rock and mumbling about intersectional feminism.

Contributor II

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

3
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Fan Fiction & LGBT Expression

Last week, Archive of Our Own (AO3), a major fanfiction archive and network, won the Hugo award for Best Related Work, an award never before given to a website or unpublished fan work. Fan fiction is the genre that comprises unpublished, written fan works based on other media, such as comics, television, film, and books. Perhaps because it is written by "amateurs" or because it is unpublished, fan fiction has often been scoffed at as unprofessional or self-indulgent. But for fans, fan fiction can be a way of reshaping popular media to reflect their identities. Members of the LGBT community in particular often criticize popular media for lacking compelling narratives surrounding LGBT themes, and when left unsatisfied, many fans turn to fanfiction to see themselves in the media they otherwise enjoy.

How does fanfiction fill a void in representation for LGBT fans? What role does fanfiction serve in building and maintaining a fanbase, if any? And what happens when any particular piece of media garners a notable LGBT fan fiction fanbase? What transformative properties do LGBT fan works enact upon media, and what are the positive & negative consequences?

  • Fanfiction has always been a form of escape and wish-fulfillment. For some people, that may be making slight changes to stories; for others, it could be as large as changing a character's identity. Either way, it is a safe space to gather with a community of writers similar to you, and, if you already feel alienated because you are a part of a marginalized community, it can provide a support system you may not be able to find as easily elsewhere.This is a very interesting topic and one I hope someone will pick up. It is very complex and not something I can explain readily in a comment, but definitely one worth exploring. – fhlloyd 6 months ago
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  • Fanfiction is amazing. It gives both writers and readers the catharsis of a world in which they/their OC can interact with beloved people and characters. It's also a nice way of making oneself into someone they wish to be. I agree both with your "reshaping popular media" comment, as well as fhlloyd's comment regarding alienation and support systems. Despite being borne of one person's fantasies, others may find content relatable and enjoyable. – SmileQueenCross 5 months ago
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Taken by SpookyDuet (PM) 4 weeks ago.
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The Evolution of Anime Streaming

Analyse the growth and transformation of the anime industry in North America alongside the increasing accessibility of anime streaming. From disjointed episodes uploaded to YouTube in parts, to illegal fan-subbing websites, to today’s officially licensed streaming sites like Crunchyroll and Netflix, how and where fans watch anime has drastically changed. Examine the ways this has impacted anime’s popularity (and vice-versa) as well as the viewer experience. How has it affected shows that are not licensed to streaming services? What happens when a service fails (see: Amazon’s Anime Strike)?

  • Anime streaming has been a contentious topic for a long time because in the early days, most if not all of it was illegal. Since watching the streaming videos was easier than buying the licensed product, the anime studios both in Japan and the US lost tons of money, and some people in the anime industry have even given whole panels at cons explaining about the perils of streaming. A lot of the policies of legal streaming sites like Crunchyroll--as well as the new technique of simuldubbing--were developed to deter illegal streaming or make it less profitable. – Debs 7 months ago
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  • Thanks @Debs! That makes a lot of sense. If you have any recommended sources that talk about this, let me know. I wonder if I can find any sources that talk about why some illegal sites have remained, despite the prevalence of legal streaming? – Eden 7 months ago
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The Good Place: Philosophically Sound?

I think it would be interesting if someone familiar with philosophy or moral theory could dissect some of the main thematic elements in the television series "The Good Place". Main character Eleanor awakes after death in heaven, only to realize she isn’t a "good enough" person to belong there. She receives lessons from a former ethics professor, which she attempts to apply towards her daily life to become a better person.
The show quotes Kant, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Albert Camus, among others, and offhandedly mentions topics like moral particularism and utilitarianism. While the show takes these moral lessons in stride, it doesn’t do much to unpack them in the context of the show’s characters. Moreover, while much of the show focuses on the question, "what does it mean to be a good person?" I think there are other philosophical questions the show hints at, like what heaven or hell really is, and in which scenarios we can or should put ourselves before others.
What questions about morality and ethics does "The Good Place" raise, and why should they matter to lay audiences? How does this show make these topics accessible to viewers, and why should it matter?

  • I also think dissecting it under different ethical theories that can include Deontology, Utilitarianism, Virtue Ethics, and Consequential Ethics. That would narrow it down to specifics in order to truly understand the types of characters on "The Good Place", and why they have ended up where they are. – Amanda 9 months ago
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How to Remake an Anime

Anime reboots in the past decade have been common. Some of the most successful anime series among Western audiences have been remakes of older series: Fullmetal Alchemist was notoriously remade into Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood by Studio Bones and experienced substantial commercial success. Hunter x Hunter was remade in 2011 and brought a new generation to love the series. Devilman Crybaby by studio Science Saru remade the 1972 cult hit Devilman and became a critical success and quickly a cult fan hit on Netflix. Dragon Ball Z Kai, a remake of the immensely popular Dragon Ball Z, experienced popularity domestically and abroad. But others have suffered: Basilisk: The Ōka Ninja Scrolls, and Berserk (2016) were critically panned. Mixed critical and fan reviews met Sailor Moon Crystal. This year, shoujo series Fruits Basket is due for an entire series reboot that promises to capture the nostalgia of the older series. What makes an anime reboot successful–is it the popularity of the source material, the production studio, or just passionate fans? This article will examine the history of full-series anime remakes, their popularity, and their critical reception, to show that not every series should be remade. For those that have been deemed successful, this article will look at common elements that contributed to their success and how they might be applied to future reboots.

  • Think about any beloved property from the past from any medium. Can that beloved property be revisited with new and fresh ideas brought to the table? If the answer is yes, then a remake shouldn't be out of the question. If the answer is no, then it should be left alone. That's pretty how I think about remakes or reboots and the same can be applied to anime. Maybe some aspects of an older anime are outdated or could be improved upon, while unsuccessful remakes don't quite capture what fans liked about the original in the first place and don't really introduce interesting ideas. – cbo1094 10 months ago
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  • Remakes and reboots really need to capture the spirit of the original work if they are to be seen as doing anything other than riding the coattails of the original: otherwise, they may as well be a completely new series. As an example of a bad reboot, Nurse Witch Komugi R took what made the original special and exchanged it for generic magical girl tropes. Such moves are likely to both offend fans of the original and fail at standing out among the ample competition from past and present – LaPlant0 9 months ago
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Depictions of Abusive Parents in Anime/Manga

Anime and manga is filled with the trope of abusive, neglectful parenting. Incredibly popular anime and manga have featured characters suffering from some history of emotional or physical abuse from their parents. Memories of this abuse tend to drive their motivation and goals. A few examples include Gaara, Hinata, and Naruto from Naruto, Shinji from Neon Genesis Evangelion, Historia Reiss from Attack on Titan, Todoroki Shouto from My Hero Academia, and almost all the Zodiac characters from Fruits Basket. Examples abound, and some of the most well-loved characters have horrible family histories. This article seeks to examine the prevalence of this trope, the psychology behind abuse, the importance of its depiction, and why it might resonate with readers. It also looks at how abuse is depicted in a visual medium, and how that affects how the character is interpreted by the audience.

(Since there are so, so, *so* many examples of abusive parents in this medium, I’m curious as to whether I should hone in one one series instead of doing a broad sweep. Let me know what you think!)

  • I agree that there's many examples that can be used for this topic, which is great as it will provide a lot of content that can be analyzed and addressed. Rather than just focusing on one series, it might be interesting to reference multiple examples from different animes and mangas. However, try not to be too broad when referencing multiple examples - you'd still want to go into depth and analyze each example thoroughly. Doing so could possibly reveal similarities and/or differences to how abusive parents are portrayed in these mediums and what this might mean on a greater and thematic level. – jay 12 months ago
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  • It also might be important to ask what the effect of the abuse may have on the characters (within) the stories themselves. How do the characters deal with their abuse. How does it change them. – Jiraiyan 12 months ago
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Representation and Streaming Media: Why Gay Characters Matter in Netflix Originals

Briefly outline and analyze Netflix original series that have garnered both positive and negative attention from the online LGBT community. Discuss why some series disappointed gay and queer fans, like Voltron: Legendary Defenders and Kiss Me First, and others delighted them, like She-Ra: Princesses of Power, Sens8, and Black Mirror. Potentially discuss whether other streaming services have "hopped on the bandwagon" with gay-friendly shows or have yet to catch up.

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    Latest Comments

    Eden

    Good point! That was a tangent that I felt deserved its own article. I’m thinking of different KPOP fandoms as well as western boy bands. Fic for “real people” has been around longer than most people realize, but the nature of writing about actual people has always been a slightly more sensitive topic than fictional characters. I think it would also be tied to a discussion about “cringe culture” and how celebrity worship/idolatry can both empower and harm young people (especially young girls).

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    Please share a link to your work, if you like! I’m sure I wouldn’t be the only one interested in more (GOOD!) lesbian representation!

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    Thank you, Jeff! Please let me know if they have any comments!

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    This is so true! So much of what is being traditionally-published (and therefore considered “legitimate” writing) isn’t exactly ground-breaking. And that’s okay: I don’t think writing needs to be completely ground-breaking and Pulitzer Prize-worthy to be enjoyed. But I know so many fics that are incredibly literary but dismissed because they’re shared online.

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    This is true, to a certain extent. But I caution you: I do think the large portion of female/gender-nonconforming individuals associated with writing fanfiction plays into it, as well as the societal preconception of all same-sex relationships as being oversexualized. Gay and queer couples have historically been oversexualized, and called “sexual deviants” and “queer” as a means of denying them the same rights as straight folks. So I would encourage you to question your concept of “oversexualized” and why it might only apply to gay couples. On the other hand, straight authors and media creators (particularly straight women) are notorious for objectifying gay male couples in harmful ways. I want to give writers the benefit of a doubt, but it’s actually hard to find gay writing written by gay authors. I highly recommend finding and supporting LGBT+ content creators through social media as a way of supporting authentic fic!

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    This is a really interesting question, because you’ll get answers all across the spectrum (pun intended) about whether or not it’s ok. My personal take: if it’s transformative, it serves a purpose. Maybe a character is gay in canon, but you make them bisexual or pansexual and put them in a heterosexual relationship. Maybe they’re transgender, and they end up in a heterosexual relationship. And what is “straight” anyway? Sexuality is a spectrum. The great thing about fanfiction is you get to decide where you want characters to fall along the spectrum. It can be considered harmful if you decide you want to write about conversion therapy or a character “realizing” they’re straight, because there’s a lot of harmful tropes and real-world representation of that in media already. Sexuality is a spectrum, and fanfiction offers freedom to explore it!

    Fanfiction and LGBT+ Representation
    Eden

    Great article. There’s something so gratifying about making a tangible thing with your own two hands…no matter how imperfect! I recently took up embroidery, and while it looks nothing like the pros, it makes me glad to see how far I’ve come personally. I think that’s truly a reflection of DIY culture.

    Craft-Mageddon: The Explosion of DIY Culture
    Eden

    Great article, should be required reading for every speech class/club!

    Planning for a Better Communication