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What Makes My Hero Academia So Goshdarn Likeable?

My Hero Academia first garnered attention when it gained a surprising amount of momentum soon after its debut in Shounen Jump, often being heralded as a spiritual successor to highly successful and soon-after ended shounen titles like Naruto and Bleach. Now, with one completed anime season and a second one ongoing, MHA can be seen everywhere in otaku culture, particularly in the realm of visual essay analysis videos posted on Youtube and elsewhere. All this, despite the fact that, as many fans and critics have pointed out, there’s nothing particularly new or inventive about it. MHA takes almost every traditional shounen trope in the book and runs with them, using them to their greatest effects. It’d be interesting to pinpoint what some of those tropes are and how MHA uses them so effectively. The writer could also analyze how outside factors (like timing and anime adaptation) affected its popularity growth over the past 2-3 years.

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    "Anne With An E" - Elucidating emotional realism and compassion

    Some parents feel that Netflix’s Original series "Anne With An E," a remake of Montgomery’s beloved "Anne of Green Gables," goes too far in introducing topics such as child abuse, neglect, bullying, and sex to a family audience. Others feel it is an amazing and beautiful handling of these topics, teaching compassion and consideration even in a dark world. How does discussing difficult emotion promote or prevent healing and understanding?

    • J'adore your topic! :) – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
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    • Thanks! :) – CLHale 2 months ago
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    Out of the Ashes: Building New Societies in The Walking Dead

    The Walking Dead comic series shows various groups of people trying to form new societies in order to survive the zombie apocalypse. Examine the different types of societies in the show (Woodbury, The Kingdom, The Hill, Terminus, etc.) and how they form and sustain their societies as well as the flaws that inevitably lead to their downfall at the hands of the Walkers.

    • I'm not familiar with this show (not a fan of zombies, vampires, and etc.) but this sounds like a fun and informative topic. It might be worth contrasting the strengths of each society with their weaknesses (e.g., is one society weak in an area where another is strong). – Stephanie M. 3 days ago
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    Should we judge remakes based off the original?

    With the release of the live-action version of the popular anime based off a popular manga, and the negative reviews already flooding out, should we judge remakes off originals, treat them separately, or perhaps a little bit of both?

    • You could expand your suggestion for this topic to include a few examples (I'm sure you must have one or two in mind) and perhaps also include references to any particular genre (or genres), as we can't really place all anime features based on mangas in the same basket. One size doesn't necessarily fit all. It would also be worth considering what a live action remake might bring to the original story and whether some elements might indeed work better in a live action setting. There's also the sensitive subject of 'whitewashing' characters for a Western audience, such as Scarlett Johansson's casting as Major Kusanagi in the recent (and in my opinion, very poor) live action remake of G.I.T.S.. Compare this to the casting of Mana Ashida in the live action remake of 'Usagi Drop' (2011), which had been deliberately adapted to remove certain questionable elements in the original manga story. I mention these two remakes (or adaptations) particularly for the different approaches used by their directors - the former was heavilly scripted, whereas the latter had a loose script that permitted a certain amount of experimentation and ad-libbing from the actors, creating a more natural feel to the developing relationships. – Amyus 4 weeks ago
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    • I'm not sure if this is a case of "should we." People are going to judge remakes by originals, adaptations by books, and so on. It's human nature. I think the actual question, as you mentioned here, is *how* to best judge. – Stephanie M. 3 weeks ago
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    • I think I agree a lot with Stephanie. My main focus for this question I posed revolved around the idea that people deliberately shy away from remakes if they are fans of the original. Different art forms allow for very different ways of telling stories, and I think a lot of the time (if not nearly all), remakes do do a poor job of retelling stories due to not finding the right balance of keeping original content and creating new content. Is it up to the audience to be open to new ideas in an already created universe or up to the creators to develop and expand on that same universe. – Zoinks 3 weeks ago
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    • We should because that is what it is based on. There are a lot of movies who do sequels and cant follow the original movie because of copyright laws. They should name it something different. – seniorhomecare 2 days ago
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    • I think for a viewer, it comes down to how they watch a film/show. Some people might not be familiar with the original property and will be unbiased going in while others who have seen it will have an expectation (maybe they want to see something that aligns with the original or a new take on it). I think for the viewer it's all subjective.For the creator of the new property, they need to know going in that this is a known story with strong supporters so justice needs to be done to the material (whether they take it in a new direction or not). I think this is most successful when the new creator has a connection with the source material, so they are the best one to be in the driver's seat. – jonj 1 day ago
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    The message that George RR Martin is trying to send with Game of Thrones

    Analyze and discuss what greater meaning there is in Game of Thrones, an overarching message that Martin is trying to send to his readers (and viewers I guess) beyond the amazing fantasy, political intrigue, and gut-wrenching battles and deaths that has enraptured most of the fan base.

    • An interesting idea for a topic, especially since Hillary Clinton appears to identify with the Cersei Lannister/Baratheon character. Real life copying art? – Amyus 5 days ago
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    • Something can be said for the unabashed yet tactical killing off of characters in the series, and what relevance this has in contemporary television's trends in dependency on viewer/fan preferences/reactions. – LNwenwu 19 hours ago
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    Has 4K Blu-Ray arrived at the wrong time?

    With online services like iTunes and Vudu offering consumers the chance to buy movies and TV shows digitally, has the relatively new 4K Blu-Ray arrived at the wrong time? How much longer will DVD formats in general last?

    • It may be worthwhile to look into media history comparing Blockbuster and Netflix to see how they adapting to changing consumer trends in the same DVD and streaming challenge. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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    Why the Chinese movie Wolf Warrior II have witnessed great success in such a comparative low budget?

    Analyse why the new Chinese movie Wolf Warrior II have witnessed great success in such a comparative low budget?
    And also, what is the advice for making national cinema to go internationally competitive in the Hollywood context? Would big budget or cooperation with Hollywood crew be a must?

    • It would be interesting to expand this topic to include examples of other medium-to-low budget Oriental films that have had great success globally and, perhaps what impact or influence these may have had on Western film makers. I confess I haven't seen Wolf Warrior II, so I'll put it on my 'to watch' list. Also worth addressing is whether there is actually a need to compete with Hollywood when domestic audiences in China or South Korea for example do engage with their domestic film makers enthusiastically. – Amyus 2 weeks ago
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    Red Dwarf - Growing old disgracefully in Space.

    The British science fiction comedy TV series ‘Red Dwarf’ (1988-1999)(2009-Present) has gained a cult status and follows the misadventures of what are essentially four less than intrepid blokes stuck in Space. With the main characters frequently exhibiting flaws such as cowardice, laziness and downright incompetence, the stories provide a welcome, humorous antidote to the morally upright characters typically found in many science fiction series. The latest series is due to appear in October 2017 and the fact that the lead actors are no longer the spring chickens they once were has not gone unnoticed by the show’s main writer, Doug Naylor, who has already started to include jokes at the expense of his ageing characters. Could this perhaps lead to the birth of a new comedy genre that would playfully examine the inevitable encroachment of advancing years and a second childhood in a Sci-Fi setting?

    • This is an interesting point. One of the newest trends emerging out of the UK has been the changing focus of target audience age groups. One of the best examples of this has been 'Dr Who' with the return to an older doctor with both Peter Capaldi and Jodie Whittaker. In many ways this is a logical choice as the aging baby boomers are still the largest generation and are now progressing into a period of having greater disposable incomes and time, it makes sense then that there is a return to nostalgic childhood, but explored through the aging "grey" actors. – SaraiMW 2 days ago
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    The Challenges of Writing Second Person Point of View

    Using second person point of view isn’t exactly common when it comes to literature. It often brings to mind "Choose Your Own Adventure" stories, but not likely much else. Novels often seek to put the reader into the protagonist’s shoes so to speak, which second person point of view literally does, so what accounts for its limited use? Examine what puts this type of narrative at a disadvantage compared to the more popular first-person and third-person points of view in novels. What are some examples that make good use of second person point of view and how they successfully navigate its pitfalls and/or subvert its expectations?

    • The first example that comes to mind is Tolstoy's "Sevastopol in December," but you're correct to note its rarity. Epistolary novels can also, to a certain extent, be seen as utilizing second-person narration, since authors of letters are directly addressing an implied reader with a unique identity; this, however, becomes complicated by the commingling of the first-person "I" of the letter-writer and the second-person "you" of the recipient, thus reducing the formal purity of a single focalizing voice. It's interesting that you should bring up interactive narratives, since another possible example in that vein are so-called "first-person" video games. These may be better interpreted as actually being second-person, since the avatar through which the player experiences the game is less of a narrator than a participant √† la "Choose Your Own Adventure." The true narrator in such cases is the text which appears on screen to provide instruction to the "you" who experiences the ludonarrative. – ProtoCanon 1 week ago
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    • Here's a recent one--Jemisin's "Broken Earth" series. Of course, it's phrased as being told by someone to someone else, but that's just the frame of it. It never leaves "you," and knows everything. – IndiLeigh 9 hours ago
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    Existentialist shenanigans in Woody Allen films

    A detailed analysis of the existentialist nature of films by Woody Allen. It’s pretty interesting how many of his films challenge contemporary societal issues through existentialist ideologies. This article could be a break down of his various films and the manner in which they explore ideas relating to existence and the meaning of life, often in a comical manner. From Bananas to Annie Hall to the more recent Cafe Society, Woody Allen films are typically incredibly humorous whilst also a great insight into the meaninglessness of life. What you all think?

    • I would love it if someone explained Woody Allen. I have never gotten the appeal. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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    • Perhaps a disclaimer could be written to focus on the movies only and not his personal life. I was never a fan and his point often escaped me anyway. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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    • That's a good point Munjeera! I feel like often the point of his films can go over your head. They're not necessarily supposed to be extremely thought-provoking or anything (excluding Interiors and a few others) but they still have that reoccurring theme of existentialism which I personally quite enjoy and find very interesting. – ninaphillips27 3 months ago
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    • I take great interest in revisiting the past works of screenwriting. I felt the same way about Robin Williams; could never really engage with his early comic charades, his escapades into worlds of fantasy, and finally his masterpieces: Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting. All the pieces of that literary puzzle eventually came to light. Robins and Allen teach us that life is as jovial as it is entrenched in trivial matters--much ado about nothing--if I may. – lofreire 3 months ago
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    The Women of The Bold Type

    The first season of The Bold Type just concluded and it has received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and viewers alike. For a show predicated on the lives of three young women – Jane, Sutton, and Kat – working at a women’s magazine, the writers could have easily made its characters vapid and its plot shallow or overly predictable, or pit the three females together in competition with each other. Instead, these women each occupy their own department within the magazine and only ever try to support each other as they navigate their love lives, sexuality, jobs, and identities.
    Analyze the diversity of The Bold Type’s major female characters (Jane, Sutton, Kat, but even Jacqueline and Adena are useful for this discussion): their strengths, faults, and growth throughout the season. How does the characterization of these women, and the obstacles they must overcome, contribute to the show’s overarching theme of female empowerment?

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      Mulan - What sets the 1998 classic apart from its fellows?

      Analyse and discuss what makes Mulan different from (and arguably better/richer than) other Disney movies. Factors to discuss include the incredible historical story (based off a real Chinese legend), the fantastic music and most importantly, the heroine. Mulan is brave, smart and selfless. This is a girl who risks her life to save her father, serves her country and even saves her male love interest (rather than the other way around). She fights well physically but combines this stereotypically male approach with creative smarts and subtle tactics which represent a more feminine approach. Her character is not reduced to a basic caricature such as tomboy, sassy cynic, ladylike woman, or silly gushing girl. Mulan is a fantastic, multifaceted personality and the movie celebrates this by showing that Mulan succeeds ultimately because she embraces her whole self and brings a unique perspective and approach situations. It is arguable that no other Disney movie has quite lived up to quality of Mulan, whether by story, music or heroine standards.

      • Love the topic! It might also be beneficial to compare/contrast Mulan to other Disney women. For example, Ariel saves Eric's life--but she's also whiny, headstrong, and spoiled, unlike Mulan. Belle selflessly sacrifices her freedom for her dad, but doesn't stand up to the Beast or fight physically, the way Mulan does in serving/saving her country. Esmeralda also saves her male love interest but is arguably "reduced to...a sassy cynic" in a lot of her scenes. Additionally, discuss the facets of Mulan's personality--compare when she's more traditionally feminine vs. when she's trying to pass herself off as a man, and how/if her personality changes. – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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      • Interesting, but for the person who picks this up, just remember that there are A LOT of articles on this site about Disney women. I suggest you read all of them and figure out how this one stands out from the rest. – Christen Mandracchia 2 months ago
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      • The fact that it's a war movie makes her character stand out most. She's socially awkward and clumsy, but she still joins the army to save her father. That takes sacrifice and courage on its own, but she later grows more confidant and takes more risks. She even taking leadership in the final battle. Like you said, her character isn't based on some trope, she's just doing what needs to be done. Her humility is another admirable trait, as seen when she turns down a position in the palace to return home. What makes her realistic is how she reflects real-life soldiers. They know the sacrifice they're making, but they would give anything to see their families again. We didn't have a character arc like Mulan's until Moana came out eighteen years later. – MaryJane 3 days ago
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      Can YA Lit still benefit and be enjoyable to adult readers? Does it need a fresh start?

      There tends to be a negative stigma attached to Young Adult literature these days. It’s too clich√©, it’s all the same, there too many vampires, angels or oppressing dystopian societies etc etc. And it seems once you’ve passed a certain age you’re looked down on for still reading and enjoying these books. Do you, as an adult, walk down the Young Adult aisle and fear the judging eyes on you from behind? As if they’re silently telling you to grow up? Is this a problem within the genre or people in general? Do you believe that we need a fresh wave of writers to bring a new edge to the idea of Young Adult literature to crack this stigma attached?

      • I completely understand your concern about the stigma surrounding YA. I would be the first to disagree with you and the genre, except that I found that the true value in YA is with the wisdom entrusted within the prose and the imagination. Nothing ever changes in life, the more we progress in time, the more certain things remain constant, is the way I see it. I find myself going back to the tried and true pages of text, and realizing how powerful the messages were, I was just too distracted and inexperienced to make sense of it. YA is at the bottom of my list of books to read, but certainly will remain a vital recourse when I ever hit that road block every writer faces. – lofreire 3 months ago
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      • YA is going through a trilogy phase for sure. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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      • There has also been a trend in YA of forced social issues taking precedence over the plot. If these themes are at the forefront, it starts to feel more like a lecture than a narrative. Social issues should happen organically in fiction and leave the reader with enough information to discuss and form their own opinions. – AGMacdonald 3 months ago
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      • I'm suspicious of the YA designation because so much of the time, the books seem to be pretty similar (not necessarily with plot devices or dystopian view, but in their view of young adulthood as-told-from privileged adulthood). Also, YA is a pretty profitable market, hence the cliches and repetition. The genre designation is very convenient as a marketing and book-sales tool. As for "outgrowing" YA, that's why the publishing industry has a growing interest in the term New Adult, which is a kind of transitional term between YA and Adult fiction -- that might be an interesting place to look to answer this question of stimga. – belindahuang18 3 months ago
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      • That judgment is precisely why I don't buy YA in bookstores (I usually use Kindle). Having admitted I do read it, I'm also pretty picky about what I do choose. YA literature does, in my opinion, need something of a facelift. It's become stereotypical; most people think YA is either dystopian or saucy teen romance. As we know though, it's much more than that. – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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      • I am quite the contrary to the opinion held of YA, and my preference in regarding this topic. My position is though--modestly, different. I am an adolescent, presently I do not take interest in YA literature, though I must admit no young adult commonly prefers philosophy instead. It isn't enjoyable to me (YA) , though I enjoy the "boring" stuff. Anyone up for discussion, just let me know. – Mindovermatter 1 week ago
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      John Lennon: Singular Talent Or Group Dynamic

      Was John Lennon a multi-talented individual or did his success arise from a mixture of personal and professional acquaintances, geographical destinations, life experiences, or generational appetite? Examine the events leading to his early struggles as a fledgling art student, to the final years of masterful composing in order to isolate and understand the potent recipe for musical ascendancy.

      • Interesting idea. I lean toward Lennon being a singular talent. He obviously benefited from his band mates in the '60s, but his solo material subsequently is quite wonderful. I think you could make a compelling argument for either side of this issue. – John Wilson 2 weeks ago
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      The Early Formation Of The Child Performer

      Modern performances rely on young actors amid outlandish worlds of fantasy and fable. It is often conveyed through technological devices such as computer graphics or scale mock-ups. But years ago, child performers had only their voice, their dancing feet, their counterpart, and a reliable stream of antics to deliver entertainment to audiences. In the tradition of Shirley Temple and Little Rascals, show how much or how little technological advancement in screenplay has impacted the burgeoning and maturing actor into a unique form or into a rambunctious version of the original model. By all means, incorporate relevant patterns of the genre by configuring actors such as Mickey Rooney (who started in silent film) into the prose, or the Brooke Shields foray into fashion, modeling, and advertising.

      • Relevant article: https://the-artifice.com/secret-life-of-shirley-temple/ – Misagh 2 weeks ago
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      • An interesting suggestion for an article! There's a great history of cinema to draw upon indeed, but might I also suggest widening the subject to include a look at young actors/actresses' development outside of Hollywood? – Amyus 2 weeks ago
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      • A lovely topic with plenty of research to draw from. I'd be especially interested in the writer's take on Shirley Temple. Both my grandmas had some of her movies, so I watched her as a kid. I liked her, but even when I was little I felt her acting was overdone and whiny. I wonder now if that was encouraged because of a lack of technology, or if today's child stars have similar problems. (Personally, I've seen some really good ones and some that can't act to save their little lives). – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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      Hollywood on Trial

      Discuss the political climate that existed in the American entertainment industry in the early 1950s that was exploited by Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House In-American Activities Committee (HUAC), and ramifications of the committee’s investigations.

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        When do movies become too violent for the demographic that watch them?

        Movies can be said to entertain us, thrill us, scare us, and even make us cry. However, there are certain movies that reach a new level of violence that can cause nightmares, tears, and the desire to copy it and send it back out into the real world causing real harm to others just because it looked cool in a movie. When is too violent?

        • An interesting topic, and definitely one worth pursuing. It might also be interesting to see how the standards have changed. When some films from the 70s and 80s were transferred to DVD, their censorship ratings were often downgraded, particularly in regards to violence.You might also consider how Western society seems to be far more squeamish and conservative about sex (even to this day).A perfect example was seen here in Australia. Game of Thrones has been given an R rating every season except for season 3, despite this being the season containing The Red Wedding. A pregnant woman was stabbed in the stomach, and yet this was the only season (so far) to be given an MA15+ rating. So, apparently fifteen year olds can watch the murder of a unborn child, but they're not mature enough to watch characters having sex. – AGMacdonald 3 months ago
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        • Are we making a distinction between the demographic who watch them and the demographic who they are intended for? If a film is a incredibly violent and it's classification accurately conveys that then the demographic watching the film likely won't find it too violent. I don't quite understand your topic, unless you were to focus on something like issues with film classification, as AGMacDonald mentioned in the above comment. – LeonPatane 3 months ago
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        • I think people are only hit with "too violent" when the movie was improperly advertised. People dumb enough to reenact violent things from movies are going to happen, so debating the censorship of all movies ever made isn't quite helpful. I think the focus should be on movies that went too far from what viewers were made to expect, and how that impacts people. I remember liking to watch horror movies with my friends as a preteen and we popped in something we thought was strictly a suspense slasher. Blood, gore, and a little bit of soft core porn were considered acceptable. But then five to ten minutes of the movie was spent depicting rape. My friends were deeply disturbed and wanted to shut it off, for them that was "too far" whereas I agree with AGMacdonald in that our idea of certain kinds of violence over others at a certain age is terribly askew. What levels and types of violence are acceptable at not just which age rating but in which genres? – Slaidey 3 months ago
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        • As someone in the filmmaking world, I don't ever want to tell someone to "tone down" their movies. I think movies are great ways of communicating something important in an entertaining way. But I agree with Slaidey, they need to be properly advertised. Also, I think if you are someone who knows they will be offended by strong violence, it's your job to find out before watching a movie if it's going to offend you and then make a decision as to whether you will watch it or not. Good topic, I think it's one worth pursuing. – maxxratto 3 months ago
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        • Most of the comments I would have made regarding this topic have already been more than adequately addressed by other commentators. Perhaps an historical context would work best, as suggested by AGMacdonald, combined with a look at the psychology (or should that be psychopathy? [sic]) of violent films that would, unfortunately by necessity, have to include an acknowledgment of snuff movies. As long as there is an audience for this stuff then extremely violent films and/or TV series will continue to be made...sadly. – Amyus 2 weeks ago
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        • This is certainly an interesting question, but one that might be impossible to answer. Perhaps if you changed the question, such as, "How violent is too violent for X demographic?" There's plenty of research and controversy on what kids, teens, and even adults should expose themselves to. I think choosing one demographic will help your article tremendously. – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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        How Music Makes Film and Television

        What would happen if John Williams’ theme for Star Wars played in the background of a sensual, romance scene? Or if a whimsical tune from Alice in Wonderland played as characters were being savagely slaughtered in a horror movie?

        This piece of writing would deal with why music is so important to a movie or television show and how song selection can make or break the impact of scenes. It would speak about why composers use specific instruments, sounds or techniques over others to portray certain moods.

        • There's a really good Youtube channel called 'Sideways' that discusses media music; check it out! – m-cubed 3 weeks ago
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        • A fascinating subject for a topic. It might also be relevant to make note of those composers who have deliberately created music for a particular scene that appears contrary to the mood of that scene and yet somehow seems to compliment it. Just one example off the top of my head is the music for the model train chase in Aardman Animation's 'The Wrong Trousers'. – Amyus 2 weeks ago
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        • Horror films often do this, like at the end of Halloween II when they play Mr Sandman through the credits. Creepy. – AGMacdonald 2 weeks ago
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        • I would suggest focusing--this is a very old, very broad topic. – IndiLeigh 2 weeks ago
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        • Accidentally posted before finishing--I suggest talking about different genres and using mostly examples of recent movies (e.g., Atomic Blonde, Darjeeling Limited, Moonlight). – IndiLeigh 2 weeks ago
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        • In my university major studies I did one subject called Survey of Film Music with Dr James Wierzbicki at USYD, in which we were introduced and discussed through the history of film music and the trends of making film music throughout the long film history. In classic Hollywood era, major studios hire full-time composers (most of them from Germany) and orchestra to compose music after the visual part is finished, whereas in contemporary film music making, there are also avant-garde or experimental films of which the film editing is after the music is written. "Film Music: A History (Routledge, 2009)" might be a good choice if you are looking further for film music history since the pre-cinema era. :) – Chenlei 2 weeks ago
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        • It's not about Hollywood, but in Bollywood, mostly movies are famous for their music and songs. – Vinita 1 week ago
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        • There is also the element of actually using these songs from one "classic" film in another film. The example that comes to mind is the use of the theme from 2001 in Clueless. – derBruderspielt 1 week ago
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        CW's "The 100" and Moral Relativity

        "The 100" has become known for its morally gray characters. In the TV show, warring clans often use the justification "[insert devastating action] was done for my people." However, "The 100’s" stance is not so clear cut. Discuss the TV show’s portrayal of moral relativism. Does "The 100" agree with the justifications characters provide for their actions (i.e. committing genocide "for [their] people")? Or does it want viewers to challenge the ideologies behind the "heroes" behavior? What evidence contributes to your conclusion, whether it be cinematography, symbolism, plot parallels, etc?

        • Almost all characters have their "gray" moments, but Marcus Kane's season 1 arc was very important in defining the show for me. – IndiLeigh 2 weeks ago
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        Time travel and alternate universes in Donnie Darko

        An explanation of the way time travel works in Donnie Darko, why Donnie was the chosen time traveller, the role of Frank the bunny, and whether or not the events that took place were as a result of time travel or took place within an alternate universe/reality.

        For all the DD fans who just can’t quite wrap their head around all the theories.

        • The works of M.C. Escher, especially his fascination with closed loops, would be an important reference – JLaurenceCohen 1 year ago
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        • Hey llsebben, love Donnie Darko, great topic idea -- I think filmmaker Richard Kelly was unable to answer the same question in an interview somewhere, might be interesting to get his take on this (if he has one). – cbharris 11 months ago
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        • An excellent idea for a topic! I was going to suggest taking a look at the 'Casual Loop' phenomenon, but this has effectively been suggested already by JLaurenceCohen's comment. It might also be worth noting that the director's cut of DD includes more information about 'Grandma Death' (Roberta Sparrow) and her book. I was disappointed with the follow-on film 'S.Darko' though as it just seemed to cover old ground and failed to introduce anything new to the concept. – Amyus 2 weeks ago
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        • Donnie Drako opens up more questions than answers with regards to time travel. We can discuss on this for years and still have no conclusion. Much like Shining being discussed for this long. – theidealstranger 2 weeks ago
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