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Games as Multimedia Storytelling

Approached from the perspective of being an interactive story, what is unique to games like MMORPGs (esp. sandboxes), metroidvania, war games or survival games, as stories? What are some of the ways that gaming has innovated new ways of telling stories (think non-linear, interactive etc). Games can pull together disparate storytelling techniques like visual, auditory and interactive in a way that books, comics or film alone can’t. Has the gaming industry harnessed this potential?

If you want to narrow it down to a specific category i’d recommend visual novels and RPGs, as they feel a lot closer to the question.

  • It would be very helpful to mention Final Fantasy XV, which one could argue spread itself too thin with the multimedia storytelling. It was a double-edged sword: People could access the series through the anime, the feature length movie or even the retro style gaming experience of A King's Tale.For someone like me, who was heavily invested in the series already, it was wonderful and got me excited for the game in the lead up; but for a casual gamer who just wanted to play the game, or a movie-goer just wanting to watch the film, it would make it difficult for them to grasp the entire story without turning to the internet to fill in the blanks. – AGMacdonald 5 mins ago
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What the Seeker Has Sought: Femininity and Masculinity in Horizon Zero Dawn

The progressive female representation of Aloy in Horizon Zero Dawn has been praised by reviewers and gamers alike. However, the gender politics of Horizon Zero Dawn begs to be further examined. Is there a dichotomy created between the feminine and masculine through characters such as Aloy, Elizabet, and GAIA in contrast to Ted Faro, Sylens, and HADES? Additionally, how is this dichotomy complicated by these same characters or others that Aloy encounters?

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    What creating an 'Anthology' series really means for Star Wars

    With the success of Rogue One and the several other stand alone films that Disney has planned to release with the famous brand, explain how this decision changes the way that we look at Star Wars’ film legacy. Does it change? If so how? What does this mean for die hard fans of the series?

    • I think an important element of this discussion would be defining what makes a Star Wars film as opposed to other space stories. – C8lin 6 months ago
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    • It's also important to note that Star Wars has so much lore. Be that through the novels, comics etc. the franchise itself already has a huge knowledge base and anthology-like feel. This knowledge just isn't something the general public makes themselves aware of – Nicole Sojkowski 6 months ago
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    Efficacy of the Bechdel Test

    A work of fiction is considered to have passed the Bechdel test if it features two women who talk about something other than a man. In many cases, it also requires that the women have names. Nearly half of films meet this requirement. Does this test truly examine the portrayal of gender in media?

    • Maybe an additional question you could also ask is, what kind of insight does applying the Bechdel Test on films give us about particular filmmakers (and give some examples) and has the introduction of the Bechdel Test changed the industry at all? – Kevin 9 months ago
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    • I think another important question might be, does a film that fails the Bechdel Test always portray gender negatively? Does a film that passes the Bechdel Test always portray gender positively?If not, what does the Bechdel Test truly show us? – C8lin 9 months ago
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    • You probably already know this, but there are a lot of films, such as Showgirls or films by Russ Meyer, that pass the Bechdel Test despite the fact that they are FAR from positive portrayals of women. – jsanoff 9 months ago
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    • This could open up a really interesting argument into how low the bar is set for feminist media these days. If so many meet the requirements, are the requirements strict enough? Are they asking for enough? What would be a better test? – Mariel 9 months ago
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    • It's important to recognize that the Bechdel Test is a bare minimum of what should be required for female representation in media, not a be all end all. – Laura Andrea 8 months ago
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    • Good topic, because in my opinion, the Bechdel test sets the bar too low. Just because two female characters are named and have conversations unrelated to men, does not make them strong or memorable people. Films aimed at girls and women are particularly guilty, from Disney princess movies to Jane Austen adaptations to modernized "chick flicks." – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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    Is Fanfiction for Real Writers Too?

    Fifty Shades of Grey originated as a fanfiction online of the Twilight series in an alternate universe. It’s escalated into its own franchise. Other online writers have the same hopes for their fanfictions. But is this kind of writing appropriate and is it right that authors get to literally take other characters and rename them to make it into an entire new series, sometimes not as well-written?

    • Who is a "real writer?" In this day and age, isn't it anyone who writes and publishes something, whether traditionally, through self-publishing, or online? – Stephanie M. 6 months ago
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    • You can tie this into how English majors or people who go to college for this craft are for or against it as well. I am a fellow English Major and I think all writing is good writing, across all mediums. But, I am sure people out there things the opposite of that. Such as people who write Fanfiction don't and have no gone to school for the craft and etc., not sure if that would work but something to think about on the con side of things. – S C 6 months ago
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    • George RR Martin touched on this topic too, on his LiveJournal (he links to Diana Gabaldon's thoughts on the matter as well: http://grrm.livejournal.com/151914.html) There are many sides to this issue -- most professional writers (like GRRM) seem to be less supportive of fanfiction as a concept, whereas others are more sympathetic (like Cassandra Clare). I suppose one's relationship to fanfiction boils down to one's intent: is it better to spend your precious writing hours on someone's pre-established work, or breaking something original? – bloom 6 months ago
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    • I would say that fan fiction is just as much real writing as anything. Why? Because there are several ways for one to write, to be inspired, and to create a world. Sometimes it takes one's own version of the story to birth and even greater tale, however until we try, nothing is for certain.Articles: https://www.bustle.com/articles/71438-13-things-fan-fiction-writers-are-very-tired-of-explaininghttps://psmag.com/fan-fiction-the-next-great-literature-15c99a34d49c#.bq4yb2jb9 – Autumn Edwards 6 months ago
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    • I definitely agree with Autumn Edwards on this topic. I would say fan fic is for real writers because in its most basic form, it is a story. Who says that one can't take some aspects from a different story and create something new, or even add on to a story? Writing is writing (as long as it is not infringing on copyright/publishing/plagiarism issues) but fan fic is for real writers and I think that if it IS good enough that it could have some literary merit. – AlbusBloodworthe 5 months ago
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    • I agree with Stephanie's comment: it's about quality, not genre. Regarding bloom's comment, professional writers have a conflict of interest, so their weigh-in begs a grain of salt. I would disagree with S C that all writing is good, but, again, wholeheartedly agree that form/genre does not determine quality. – Tigey 5 months ago
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    • The issue isn't whether fanfiction is 'real' or not; the issue is that it's wrong to profit off of someone else's work. That's worse than bad writing; that's plagiarism, that's theft. – Sarai 5 months ago
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    • As a former fanfic lover, I say that writing is writing. Yes, most fanfics are empty writing fueled by obsessions and fantasies, but fanfiction has the same potential to be good writing. It just depends on who's writing it and with what purpose because think about it, a good story started out as an idea from the writer's imagination... Fanfiction starts out the same way but with already existing background information. A perfect example is the One Direction fanfiction "After" that started out as a wattpad favorite, and is now published and successful. – ValentinaRueda 5 months ago
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    • Funnily enough, I actually wrote a blog post discussing this very topic with Fantasy author M.E.Vaughan. While the blog post provides a more in-depth discussion, the long and short of it is that every writer is different. Some see fan-fiction as a helpful tool, whilst others see it as a distraction or, worse, an insult to an original creators work. Whomever decides to write this must keep on mind that, really, there is no such thing as a "Real Writer." There is only the expectation of what I writer should be doing which, when you look at it, is a very subjective and heavily debated topic. Here's a link to the post, if you're interested in the more in-depth view: https://whywordswork.wordpress.com/2016/08/02/fan-fiction-creative-practice-or-creative-procrastination-featuring-m-e-vaughan/ – ERHollands 3 months ago
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    • I think fan fiction has its purpose. A lot of a lot of literary assignments spanning elementary to college is fan fiction. In one of my last college projects I changed the ending of AI. Got a B. Also isn't a lot of science fiction tie-ins work inspired by its source material? – lisa82 2 months ago
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    The Future of Fantasy?

    Fantasy has remained a strong cultural presence from the days of Tolkein to now with Game of Thrones. Changes in the fantasy genre are unsurprising given an increased technological influence and shifts in societal attitudes. That begs the question: what is next for fantasy? Examples of current fantasy authors: Sarah J Maas (ACOWAR etc), V.E Schwab (Shades of Magic series) and others are definitely welcome (and even encouraged)!

    • One could possibly take a look on even indie fantasy films like say The Lost River and other such offbeat titles apart from the famous approved ones. – Vishnu Unnithan 4 days ago
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    What Can Prose Writers Learn From Poets?

    Poets and prose writers often receive different "instructions" on how to write well, and are encouraged to read widely in their own genre, but I would suggest that prose writers can vastly improve their craft by turning to poetry. Poets focus on imagery and concision – two tools that make immensely better prose writing too. Of course, these tools aren’t used in the same way, but reading and even writing poetry can strengthen a prose writer’s ability. Sylvia Plath’s novel The Bell Jar is a perfect example of this. Plath is best known as a poet, but her novel is unparalleled. While reading it, I was struck by the poetic use of language and economy of words (why use twenty when you could use five?). What other ways can prose writers improve from reading/writing poetry?

    • Good idea, especially about concision. I've written prose for years and still struggle with that. Poetry sometimes helps. – Stephanie M. 6 months ago
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    • Fusing prose and poetry together definitely has some merits and would make for a solid article. Determining/clarifying what type of prose writers would be helpful, as there are creative writers, fan fiction, bloggers, etc, that would likely claim their already employed vivid language that derives from poetry. Good topic though! – mazzamura 6 months ago
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    • Poetry often has a closer focus on form that can be useful for prose writers. Different poetic forms have particular histories, and are adapted or kept to for particular purposes, much more so (I find) than in most Western prose. That's something that prose writers can learn -- an appreciation or awareness of form. – belindahuang18 6 months ago
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    • There's a Judith Ortiz Cofer essay called "But Tell It Slant: From Poetry to Prose and Back Again" which refers to this idea. She discusses how one can create a better or more economical prose piece if it is "summarized" in poetry first, and the poem is then used as a framework for the prose. – ThomasB 2 months ago
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    North & South and the Parallels to Pride and Prejudice

    I noticed while I was watching North and South that there are very similar themes to Pride and Prejudice. A man who seems mean and aloof, a stuck up girl who has refused him twice and got a proposal earlier on…Falling in love in the second proposal. It would be interesting to explore all the similarities

    • You can definitely draw parallels, but they are distinctly different in thematic issues, characterization, social issues, etc. Also, you stated "while I was watching," therefore, you could simply deal with the adaptations--I believe there has only been one of N&S, but MANY of Pride and Prejudice--centering on one of the Pride and Prejudice versions. I am a huge Austen and Gaskell fan, but I am uncertain how much I agree with the validity of parallels that can be drawn. But, as I always say, I do enjoy when I am uncertain about a connection in literature and then am proved wrong, allowing me to grow as a reader! – danielle577 6 months ago
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    • There remains much to be explored about connections with Elizabeth Gaskell, Jane Austen and the Brontë sisters. Not only did Gaskell write a biography of Charlotte Brontë, there are fruitful overlapping themes begging to be explored, reworked, etc. – JudyPeters 3 days ago
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    Exploring the dynamics of the relationships in Sunstone

    For a comic that’s ostensibly about lesbian bondage sex, Sunstone manages to say a lot about relationships. It looks into all kinds of relationships, be it romantic, sexual, familial or friendship and does a great job of showing how each is important in its own right.

    Of special interest might be its exploration of the transitions from one kind of relationship to another as seen in friends becoming lovers and returning to being friends and finding that to be an incredibly special bond and also the struggle that the lead characters face in moving from a "friends-with-benefits" relationship to actual romance.

    • Add some of a focus to this - it should pass the "So What?" test for both a writer and its future readers. – mazzamura 3 months ago
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    • I haven't read this at all, but whoever picks up the topic should be sure to stress in the early parts of the article (or even the title) that it's commentary on various kinds of relationships applies to men too. I mean, obviously, but just as a note so the demographic of the article isn't instantly lessened by people feeling like they can't relate. – Slaidey 2 months ago
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    The effect of time between subsequent installments on film franchisees

    Pirates of the Carribean 2 and 3 were shot back-to-back and released soon one after the other. This is something which James Cameron is also attempting with his Avatar sequels. On the other hand, there was a gap of 59 years between the two installments of Disney’s Fantasia. Analyse the various effect the timing between episodes has on aspects like the box office prospects of the films taking into consideration factors like brand recall and set production costs.

    • I think the effect speaks to the creative principle behind the theme. In Pirates, you have the right actor, the necessary chemistry, and a setting that lends itself to dynamic rehashing of plot. Some which of pertain to other cinematic marvels, Tron, for instance; the same which could be said. But, why drown the audience in Tron revivals when the original accomplished what films are expected to accomplish: take the imagination to new and unrealistic frontiers, time and again, without the need for props and people. When the Tron sequel eventually emerged, it was nearly messianic in its prophetic second coming, to the delight of its loyal cult following. This is going to be a worthwhile literary examination, part of which I have only scratched the surface of--looking forward to it. – lofreire 5 days ago
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    • I say if you're going to do installments, space them out reasonably. A gap of 59 years is too long, because by then the original product has already aged too much. People are more inclined to hate the new installment on sight because it's not the old one. Or, they go the other way and give the new installment so much praise, the old one is forgotten. In a series like Pirates, you have to watch spacing of releases so people can keep up. The more episodic your series, the harder it may be for "newcomers" to catch up and keep up. Well-spaced releases, say 2-4 years apart, keep the series audience-friendly. – Stephanie M. 4 days ago
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    The Resurgence of the Vintage Medium

    With the current trend of shopping at the local Vinnies or Salvos and old fashion items becoming hot new styles so too has the vintage mediums been resurrected. A largely growing population of "old souls" now turn away from the digital medium in the forms of music and photography and writing and choose to use the older mediums. Vinyl record sales are on the rise, film photography (particularly polaroid) has increased and budding writers punch away on their mechanical typewriters. Why does the heavy "chick, chick, chick" of a typewriter make us more likely to be the next Hemingway? How many of us truly can hear the difference between the "warmer" sound of vinyl and the digital versions? And which hobbiest photographer can see the infinitely better contrast on the film negative compared to the ones on their iPhone 7?

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      Fandoms: what's the appeal?

      There are a number of TV shows and film franchises that have an almost cult-like following (e.g. Star Wars, Supernatural, MCU, Harry Potter, Star Trek, Doctor Who, BBC Sherlock). What’s the appeal? How or where do these "fandoms" start? Why do they exist? What do these "fandom franchises" have in common? And does it say something about our society that these are the shows that have gained fandom followings?

      • I think the social factors your questions allude are very good points of interest in this article. However, I think it'd be just as interesting to explore the impact of companies on fandoms too, because without the desire to make profit a lot of them cease to exist. Perhaps this suggests what should/shouldn't be promoted in society. Going down the rabbit hole of failed tv/book series because of small audience would be cool to learn about. But perhaps looking at "fandoms" generally is too much research for the author. It might be easier to look at the change of Fandoms in the past fifty years by comparing older ones with news ones, while addressing those same questions you've mentioned. Doctor Who or Star Trek against something like Harry Potter would be interesting, particularly as they began before the internet and encompass different generations. – olives2brand 2 months ago
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      • I definitely thing the popularity of certain fandoms indicates something about society. Mostly that escapism is stronger that ever. Whether or not this is a good thing is highly interesting! – reneekohler 4 days ago
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      Magic & The Fantastic: Why Georges Méliès Remains as Relevant as Ever

      Assess the continuing relevancy of revolutionary filmmaker George Méliès, taking note to mention not only his pioneering use of special effects, but also the practicality and methodology of his cinematic practice. While technologies and cinematic styles will always be changing, it is always important to look back and remember why we choose to make films, and what makes them so amazing and enjoyable to behold.

      • Good topic. I think Martin Scorsese's Hugo helped the recent revival of interest in this pioneering movie-maker. – Ben Hufbauer 2 months ago
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      • The story or Méliès shows how magicians responded to the emergence of film which eroded their income stream as people visited the theatres less. – Peter Prevos 2 months ago
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      Why is the public enthralled by Christopher Nolan?

      He has directed some of the most popular movies known to the American public/around the world in the last decade; so what is it about his directing style that keeps raking in audiences by the millions?

      • Nolan's pretty strong on auteur theory, good choice! – m-cubed 2 months ago
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      • I think a key feature of his films is that he tends to focus on the psychology of the human mind; what are its extents and limitations, why and how it thinks certain ways. And to audiences, I think that many find it unique and refreshing that he is creating major Hollywood films that deal with something so cerebral ( which is not as common amongst the majority of big budget Hollywood pictures) That could be an angle to take – Yanni 2 months ago
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      • JulieCMiliay,Hello again.As you pointed out, Christopher Nolan is without a doubt one of the most financially successful directors working today, and in my opinion, he deserves the praise. While this is a bit of a cheap way to make suggestions, I think it's best to simply write some pros and cons about him in order to be fair in critiquing his work while also appreciating it.First the negative:1. He isn't all that original. While many say that his movies are different and break off from most movies, the bulk of his work isn't actually original material. He's made 10 movies thus far (I'm counting Dunkirk though it hasn't been released), and only 4 of them are original (Following, Inception, Interstellar, and Dunkirk). The others are as follows: Memento is an adaptation of his brother's short story Memento Mori; Insomnia is a remake of an Icelandic movie of the same name; The Dark Knight trilogy is, obviously, an adaptation of the Batman comics; and The Prestige is an adaptation of a novel of the same name by Christopher Priest. While he is definitely an exciting director, his material usually comes from someone else. 2. Sometimes he isn't much of a craftsman, especially when it comes to editing. I'd recommend watching some videos on Nolan's editing and see for yourself how it can get a bit confusing to tell what's going on, especially during action scenes.And that's about all I can think of, really. Now the positive:1. He's a classy director. His movies don't rely on swearing, graphic depictions of sex or violence, or controversial subjects in order to get an audience. 2. He's a spectacular director. His movies are often grand in scope and, more importantly, they rarely involve CGI. The majority of the effects in his movies are practical and as such make the scenery all the more vivid. 3. His movies are, as Yanni said, interested in making the audience think. More often than not (at least in my case), I find myself thinking about his movies long after I've seen them because of the ideas presented and because of how they were presented.I hope these observations help.Thanks for your time, August – August Merz 1 month ago
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      • It would be good to see 'Dunkirk' also included in this analysis. – Vishnu Unnithan 4 days ago
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      Linear vs. open-world games

      Ever since games have gone 3D, there has been an increasing amount of open-world video games. Nowadays, it seems to be a trend of making a game open-world just for the sake of it. Does having a sandbox feel generally improve a gaming experience, or can more restrictive level design benefit a game in certain areas?

      • I would compare open world games and non-open world games to understand the pros and cons to both game types. – BMartin43 2 weeks ago
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      • It stands to reason that changing something as fundamental as dimensions would have a massive impact on the kind of games being made, and the popularity of open-world games (MMOs particularly) makes them a popular major project. Gaming is a big and competitive industry and AAA games have to follow the money. That said, there are ways to tighten up level design in a sandbox (linearity would be the main one). Whatever angle the article takes, I'd suggest acknowledging off the bat that both open-world and closed-world have their pros and cons, and there are dedicated audiences for both. – Cat 7 days ago
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      • I don't think there's an easy or objective answer to the question you've asked. The gaming experience is subjective and will depend on various factors, including what a player is looking for in their game and their personality.Having a more linear game style, I feel, is a good way to direct players through a story in a more direct way. Open world gaming has given players, or at least, coincided with the trend of, giving players more power to make and guide their own stories. One feels more like a book to read, while the other feels like you've been given a notebook, a pen, and backstory to craft your novel. Obviously, this analogy is a bit of an oversimplification.Possible benefits of linear might be: for developers with limited or low financial resources, having a linear design means they are able to dedicate their time to the finer details of a game (e.g. if they spend all their time working on an open world, the overall design quality might be reduced, the story might be lacking, etc.) but this is obviously less relevant for developers who have the resources and time to effectively design all components of a game including an open world. – Kacey Martin 3 days ago
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      Fifity Shades of Fan Fiction

      Fan fiction has a rather negative image within the literary genres. Works such as Fifty Shades of Grey do not not necessarily help the genre to renegotiate its stand in the literary world. Why is it that fan fiction is oftentimes seen as problematic? What are some positive examples? What might be the future of fan fiction?

      • For a shining example of the heights that fan fiction can achieve, I would suggest looking into Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality. It takes the source material and elevates it into something brilliant, profound and even life-altering. – Lokesh Krishna 3 months ago
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      • This is going to be a long comment but first, I really do think this question is relevant so good job. I just want to add a few things (mainly for the future writer): I gather that by fanfiction you mean those posted online for nonprofit purposes. It would be interesting to compare the impression people have of those works in comparison to "Wicked", modern Dracula/Frankenstein/etc. rewrites, those based on an existing work (ex. "Dorothy must Die" by Danielle Paige), etc. The distinction between professionally written "fanwork" and others might influence what you consider examples of fanfiction in your second question. For the first question, is there a conclusion to be drawn from people's impression of works when produced professionally? Do people assume that had a work been good it would have been published, and so works online are thus of lesser quality? Or is online fanfiction mocked because of the idea that the internet is a young person's playground, and thus online writers must be younger/less experienced? There is also the notion that fanwork is necessarily erotica which might make it seem cheaper to some. [Note: While it is also possible to discuss the pros/cons of fanworks in terms of queer representation/copyright/etc. the best thing about your question is that it's focused on people's perception of fanwork, so I wouldn't broaden the topic to include its actual workings]. For the third, one can look at the influence fans have on writers: it would be easier to see said influence on shows, but it would be interesting to see if book authors are influenced similarly. I guess my only issue then is that your topic is still very broad, and all three of your questions could make separate articles. I'm not sure I would ask you to focus on one question yet, but it would definitely be to your advantage. Still, an interesting topic. – Rina Arsen 3 months ago
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      • As a personal opinion (haven't read but watched one movie and have heard a lot of talk about it's origins), and one the future writer might use, I see it as completely irrelevant that it started out as a fan fiction because the end product doesn't rely on the source of inspiration. It's just a big messed up relationship. The fact that we constantly tie it back to it's fanfiction origins is proof that fanfic has a bad connotation, one that we should address and assess. If it doesn't affect the content, why are we still bringing it up? Why is it such a big deal? Readers of this article should ask themselves those questions. – Slaidey 2 months ago
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      • While the Artifice has received quite a few articles on this topic which are still in the publishing queue(I myself edited one today), one important derivative aspect which could be looked into is the availability of online portals for people to write out their fantasies for others to read and how this has radically altered the way people view these writings, what with everyone considering themselves a great writer.(No offense intended) – Vishnu Unnithan 5 days ago
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      Fanfictions - Delusions or Expressions of Admiration?

      Although fanfiction has had a bad reputation in the past (for being strange or ‘weird’), fanfiction allows fans to write stories involving their favourite characters and dwell into their psyche. This article can dwell on the popularity of fanfiction, and express the opinion on whether fanfiction is good or bad.

      • One function of fanfiction that gets overlooked often is that it allows young writers to develop their skills in a community where they can get a lot of feedback - especially with regards to character development. It's a really good way for writers to take an already existing character and write them in an entirely different story while still trying to keep everyone in character (Not everybody succeeds here of course, but it's a good learning exercise). – Grace Maich 2 years ago
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      • While it's true that fanfiction can help young writers to develop, it can also lead to a hindrance of creativity. I never did engage in fanfiction communities myself, but several of my friends did and our characters are markedly different. It used to surprise me when I would find their original characters infused with traits, attitudes, actions, etc. of their fanfiction characters, many of which I knew from reading their fanfiction pieces and more often the original novel. I have often wondered if our characters are so radically different in design because my friends who spent large quantities of time with other writers' characters began to...call it absorb...the basic traits, gestures, tones, actions, and ways of thinking from characters they did not create while I (and some of our other creatives) have only my own powers of observation to draw upon as I watch the people I encounter in everyday life. Whether my notion is correct or not is anyone's guess, but it does beg thought. – jennewymore 2 years ago
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      • I enjoy reading and writing fan fiction. That being said I often find it troubling when fan fiction delves into the territory of real people. The amount of fan fiction written for One Direction is frightening. These are real people with real personalities that don't become altered due to your wishful thinking. I know I would not want to read a fanfic about myself. It is those types of fan fictions that come across as delusional and slightly creepy.Writing fan fiction based on fictional works is an interesting way to to keep engaged in a fandom. It is also interesting to see how different people interpret different characters since there is no right or wrong way to interpret a fictional being. Certain fandoms have collaborative role playing in the fan fiction realm as well; It keeps people engaged in the fandom. I believe that is an expression of admiration. People are inspired by a world or a character that they want to invest time and energy in exploring that world or character further. I think that is a great compliment to the creators.There is a lot of badly written fan fiction, but there is also a lot of fan fiction that is written with care to the characters or world that they are exploring. Those fan fictions add to a fandom.– LexzieRulz 2 years ago
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      • I think something this article could explore is the stereotypes that surround fanfiction. Some people are embarrassed to admit that they write fanfiction because they're afraid that people wil automatically assume that everything they write is like Fifty Shades of Grey. Another thing to consider is that some fanfictions have been successfully published as original work (with some modifications of course). Examples: Fifty Shades of Grey, The Sidhe, Cinder, etc. – VelvetRose 2 years ago
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      • Take a look at all the different versions of Harry Potter fanfiction. There's so much! – JennyCardinal 3 months ago
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      • For most, it seems to function as a way to explore already developed characters in new scenarios. It can help to be transferred into original fiction through the way that fan fiction writers have to consider what operations or actions live within the boundaries of the already functioning character. Of course some intentionally take the character outside of written or implied canon, but it acts as a way to structure actions around the believability within diameters already set. – talorelien 2 months ago
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      • Fanfiction can definitely be cathartic. For example, if your favorite show gets cancelled or goes in a direction you disagree with, it's fun to put yourself in charge. But I don't like it when fan fiction tramples with the basic DNA or purpose of a show. For instance, if an existing show killed off certain characters (and left them killed off) it feels like cheating to bring them back. Or, if you're doing fan fiction for what is clearly a kid's show, it seems unnecessary and stupid to have the characters become stoners. – Stephanie M. 1 week ago
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      • Fanfiction allows for crossovers and allows writers to place their beloved characters in settings which they can relate to in better ways. – Vishnu Unnithan 5 days ago
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      • Also, it can be worthwhile to examine what role has been played by producers acknowledging themes from some wildly popular fanfics. Case in point the makers of Sherlock made a tongue in cheek reference to the wildly popular 'gay' theory by showing a happily ever after scene in S3E1 or say, mentioning that Sherlock may have Asperger's in the Baskerville episode. – Vishnu Unnithan 5 days ago
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      A New Generation Accepts Remakes in Spite of Their Inferiority

      Look at the remakes of today and compare them with the originals and see if the changes that have been made for a contemporary audience improve the property or not.

      • The remake adds a greater dimension of perception (or misperception) that is not entirely there in the original, perhaps due to the state of the art or the creative force behind it. The issue then becomes the over-reliance on technology (or the performer) to carry the story, leaving thin the inspiration and vitality of imagination, I believe. If you write this article and I rewrite it a year later, what (and who) determines which is better, or worse? I am eager to find out. – lofreire 1 week ago
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      • My first thought on reading the heading and pitch was the broad strokes approach to condemning/questioning the legitimacy of remakes. Same as with any work which derives from another, superiority is subjective. I'd also stress the importance of audience - in the case of series like Star Trek, the audience is extremely important because the bulk of the original audience is still around and there are huge expectations. In the case of public domain, so Frankenstein or Dracula for instance, anybody can make a TV show or a movie or a derivative novel without buying rights, and the market is already saturated with retellings of high and low quality so expectation is not as much an issue. Finally, pop culture and social awareness change and morph over time, so content which was totally acceptable in the fifties or sixties would have to change to become palatable to a modern audience, and that isn't a bad thing - it's just a necessary alteration, like tying up a loose end or addressing a minor inconsistency. – Cat 6 days ago
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      • Also,examine the need for these remakes. Doesn't the minor alteration of the story render these remakes as a form of fanfiction themselves? – Vishnu Unnithan 5 days ago
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      The portrayal of Medicine in TV Shows

      Audience fascination with medicine has resulted in a large number of riveting TV series pertaining to the topic being made. Analyse the various aspects and ethical dilemmas of medicine portrayed on various medical shows.(even the lesser known ones)

      • It should be. But, you should display acuity in choosing products that are not hoax ( giving you only complications.) – droy 4 months ago
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      • This one would take research. So many medical dramas that are designed to come across as authentic still take advantage of common misconceptions in order to cut storytelling corners, and since the bulk of what laypeople know about what to do in a crisis comes from what they've seen on TV, this can be really dangerous. On the other hand, medical dramas are a potential way to introduce little-known or misunderstood health issues to a broader audience, and it could be fascinating to explore the impact of this and the nature of the moral obligation this places on the show to be both informative, non-judgemental yet still present an engaging narrative. – Cat 6 days ago
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      The ever-changing shift of content in Creative Writing Bachelors

      Creative Writing Bachelors have different styles in each university, there is no one universal way to teach and inspire it. So, how do we define what is teachable in Creative Writing? Consider the stable and interchangeable natures of prescribed texts, preferred genres and personal preference in lecturers and tutors.

      • I think all the university can do as far as teaching is light the way with as many materials as budget will allow, given the talent pool of instructors. Then, the student has to decide how deeply he wants to delve into the landscape or how intensely she wants to tap into the faculty and the campus resources. Nonetheless, it will be a writing piece on the main factors affecting the caliber of current programs out there. – lofreire 2 weeks ago
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      • You might also delve into discussions of M.A.s and MFAs (terminal degrees) in creative writing. Are there more or fewer teachable elements for those? And, what's the difference between a degree in creative writing vs. professional writing? I have degrees in the latter, and choose to call them such because of the stigma. As in, "Oh, you studied creative writing. Isn't that cute?" Does that stigma put pressure on professors and students to make creative writing more serious, analytical, and teachable? – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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      • That is a great suggestion, lofreire. I also think the instructors' experience and depth in the creative writing industry affect the scope and length of the student's learning. – HollyDavidson 1 week ago
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      • That is a good point, Stephanie M. There is definitely a lot of material to cover about the higher degrees. I also agree that the degree comes with a certain stigma, but I wonder if that is to do with the degree itself, as it is such a popular degree that is without scientific or mathematical academia, or if it is mostly a societal stigma of 'the degree that you sit at home and do nothing with'? – HollyDavidson 1 week ago
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