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4

How should the readers take the creators' comments on their works?

Let me start with the situation that brought this topic to my mind. In the interview in 2016(Jump Ryu, vol.1), Akira Toriyama, the creator of Dragon Ball, commented that the show’s hero Son Goku does not feel any friendship towards other characters, including Krillin. This caused some controversy among the fans who saw this interview, because many thought that Goku and Krillin were the best friends; after all, Goku’s anger exploded on Krillin’s first death, and it was Krillin’s death that triggered Goku’s transformation to Super Saiyan. Does that mean the death of someone, whom he had no strong feelings for, made him angry enough to transform? Did he vow revenge for those he felt no friendship? The some fans were outraged, and some found Toriyama’s comments ridiculous, because that was far from what they read in the text, and this new information did not clear any questions they had.

Toriyama’s comments caused few controversies in the past, due to how contradictory it sounded to the readers, and also the fact that he was often forgetful of his own creations. Some even questioned the validity of his comments on Dragon Ball.

But there are other creators whose comments outside the completed text that sometimes clarifies few points. Take Tolkien’s defense of Frodo. When a fan wrote to him that Frodo does not deserve to be a hero because he had succumbed to the Ring’s seduction in the end, Tolkien explained that though Frodo could not bring himself to destroy the One Ring, his sufferings and humility up to that point deserve highest honor. In this case, the author’s comments clarified his intentions to the readers.

So this got me thinking: how should the readers treat the creator’s comments when reading the text? How critical should the readers be when considering the comments made by the creators? What analysis should be made when it seems to contradict the readings?

  • What you're describing here is, in literary theory, typically known as "Intentional Fallacy" (coined by Wimsatt & Beardsley in their famous essay of that name). It essentially argues that the text is an autonomous object which must be capable of standing on its own without the need for extratextual evidence to guide interpretation. Whatever the author intended it to mean should be made evident simply by reading the text on its own merits, and if that intention can only be made known by the author's extratextual commentary, then s/he has failed to convey that meaning in the text itself. This opens the floodgates for equally valid interpretations that differ dramatically from (and potentially contradict) the author's initial intent, so long as it can be argued on a basis of purely textual evidence. Though many critics follow this practice as gospel, more conventional wisdom typically dictates a middle course, in which authorial intent is treated as a litmus test which the text must pass before those statements can be accepted as valid sources of interpretation. – ProtoCanon 3 months ago
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  • ProtoCanon's comment is very good, but I disagree with this statement: "Though many critics follow this practice as gospel..." I don't think most literary critics today would follow Wimsatt and Beardsley's view that anything "external" to the text itself should be ignored. Critics today tend to see a text as very open, as something that is best understood by understanding the issues surrounding the text: significant historical events, significant events in the life of the author, patterns of reception by readers, and so on. They generally don't set a firm boundary around what is and what is not "the text." Today's critics would likely agree with Wimsatt and Beardsley, though, that the work of the critic must involve a lot more than simply repeating what the author said about the author's own work. – JamesBKelley 3 hours ago
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5

How To Approach Dissenting Morality

When we see a moral dilemma presented in creative mediums, we will all generally pick a side. People have their own moral compasses that dictate how they might react to a given situation. With Bethesda’s new title "Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus", a controversy of sorts arose with the games marketing campaign for being blatantly "kill Nazi’s". This is a game that is reflective of the tense current day political atmosphere in the United States; one that had some more conservative gamers taking offense to it. To them, it was seen as a blatant political statement by Bethesda in taking sides and being "politically correct". To more liberal gamers, it was pointed out that in American culture, Nazi’s, by the definition of World War II, are the bad guys and they always have been. "We’ve been killing Nazi’s in this series for many years now. Why should it be an issue now?" was a common response.

So the following question came about as a result: How might you, if you could, handle a story if it tells a tale of an individual of a dissenting opinion (perhaps if it takes a political siding), and convince everyone, regardless of personal views, liberal/conservative or otherwise, to still enjoy it just the same? And can this be done effectively and appropriately at all without angering one side or the other.

  • That's a good topic. For me, general morality and specific political identities are different things.I don't know if I would have a lot of success convincing someone to play (and enjoy playing) a game that references a current, real-world political identity in a way that conflicted severely with that other person's own beliefs. Generally, sure, we might be nice people but still enjoy playing bad people in games and might do things in games that we would never do in real life. That's not the same thing as reflecting specific political views.I guess my strategy in that argument would be to talk about what games are and how they work, allowing us to do explore things we don't normally explore in real life. That argument may not get very far, though. Sometimes we don't want to explore something. I know I would have a hard time enjoying playing a character who was a hardcore white supremacist who wanted to get rid of whole groups of people. – JamesBKelley 14 hours ago
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10

Is the discourse of text messages and abbreviated posts devolving our language?

Think about what you experience on social media and exercise whether our language is ruined or changed for the better? Should we embrace the ways of the future and look forward to books written with genius literary writing such as "yestiday i cort da bus 2 da mall 4 a shawp & lunch wid mi bffl!!!!" Will punctuation marks such as commas, apostrophes and semi colons become the way of the past whilst multiple exclamation marks and hashtags rein supreme?

  • Language does evolve. Perhaps, examples of how language has changed and how it has affected society. The writer could include reasons for language changes; such as, cultural influences or significant events that took taking place. Consequently, the writer can then address the current form of abbreviated communication. – Venus Echos 2 years ago
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  • I remember writing something on this in University, actually. I remember making the case that actually, it's the opposite. If anyone who takes this up wants to look at both sides, you could make the case that it actually takes a good command of the English language to be able to manipulate it like that, and bad spellers are much more concerned with trying to get their spellings right than manipulating the language successfully. This topic goes straight into the slang topic, from Cockney rhyming slang to internet and texting slang. It's a wide topic but very worthy of writing. – Adnan Bey 2 years ago
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  • I agree with Adnan -- language is evolving. I personally like the example of how millennials grew up with internet langauge -- first with AIM, then forum speak with loads of "epic fails" and "XD," growing up to using no shortenings, and then using shortenings ironically. "LMAO," for example, gives a different meaning than it used to when it first appeared. – ChristelleMarie Chua 2 years ago
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  • I agree it's devolving, not evolving. Yes, the simpler it gets the easier it is for less articulate people to get their point across but that simplification is resulting in a loss of language... as in, people don't know what larger words mean or how to properly spell or use grammar... The "word of the year" was an emoji, was it not? We're losing synonyms, punctuation, syntax, everything. – Slaidey 2 years ago
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  • It would be interesting to look at how educators deal with students using abbreviated words and sentences in work assignments. Do they deduct marks or consider it now mainstream enough to be acceptable language? That could be a good indicator in seeing if this abbreviated language is here to stay. – Lexzie 2 years ago
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  • I think its definitely true that abbreviation is killing the language. It is the apocalypse of Grammar – LydiaBrunet 2 years ago
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  • Wow, now this is a great topic in which I have so much to say. As a professor, I cannot even begin to discuss the amount of time spent in the syllabus, and during the first day of class, regarding the protocol of the acceptable mode of emailing. A lesson, that is unfortunately repeated in class at least one more time in the semester...If I am lucky. The emails are one thing, but regarding written assignments, I truly believe they use abbreviated "text language," out of habit. When I point this out to the student, they are usually mortified, and I therefore try not to make it a big deal, but use it as a talking point for the importance of printing out your work, reading it aloud; changing the font to see the difference; using a different screen view to gain a different perspective on one's work, etc. An entire book written in text language would drive me insane; yet, one with it intertwined in places would be fitting, and an ode to the way in which language is being used--or misused--at this point in time. – danielle577 1 year ago
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  • I think teens' culture and text speech nowadays can be helpful in a way, to make communicating more accessible to them. They have a larger sense of community now that there exists such a bigger generation gap. True -- it does make it more difficult to connect with those older than them, such as their parents. But they are more inclined to get their ideas out there, no matter how terrible they are, or how badly they are communicated. Today's technology makes it so much easier for anyone to get connected to anything, and abbreviation can definitely save time – dandeliaon 1 year ago
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  • I personally don't call it a devolution. Sure, words and phrases are getting shorter physically, a few of our best are losing syllables, but the meaning behind them has remained the same. "Text language" has its own set of rules, just like "regular English". For instance, yesterday I texted my friend a pun that I thought was absolutely hilarious. She replied with a "haha", and immediately I knew that she had not been amused.Now, if she'd replied with an "lol" or that laughing emoji, it would've been a much more positive reaction, even though all three options contain classic factors of conveying amusement. The reliance on connotation and knowing the person being contacted on at least a slightly personal level is why I don't call this shift in language a "devolution". That being said, I think the distinction between personal and professional language is important and should stick around, at least for now. I still proofread emails for proper grammar and spelling when contacting a superior or a professor, and I doubt I'll ever be comfortable sending an emoji to any of those individuals. – eschiem 1 year ago
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  • I make a distinction between the evolution of a language and the devolution of its nuanced application. It's perfectly fine for 'textspeak' to emerge as a result of modern technology–that's an evolution. However, it's an entirely different thing for people to lose their ability for nuanced communication by being too dependent on simplistic forms–that's a devolution in meaningful application. . . but lol wut do i kno??? – IsidoreIsou 1 year ago
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  • Much like eschiem said, It might be interesting to explore how the use of abbreviation actually allows language to better simulate verbal speech in text. For example "you" means something different from "u" and many young people can tell the difference. "i h8u" means something different from "I hate you" . One connotes a joking tone the other a serious statement. Its the difference between stating something plainly and saying it with a roll of the eyes. – Mariel 1 year ago
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  • Devolution or evolution, it all depends on your perception of language and culture. One thing is certain: language is constantly changing. I'm currently taking a Linguistics class called "The Nature of Language" and I had never known how altered the english language is until now. Several words that we use in every speech are shorter versions of words, words that come from names and more. Pants is short for pantaloons. Bloomers were named after Amelia J. Bloomer. I think this specific change of language, using names and truncating words is interesting and I would consider it a form of evolution. I would also consider slang a form of evolution because it provides a sense of community and helps detect a certain era of language; however, text slang which is simple severely butchered diction is not evolution in my eyes. Reducing this vast english language to a few letters and numbers is also reducing the language. – sastephens 1 year ago
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  • Personally, I hate what textspeak and technology have done to our language but then again, I'm a former English teacher and full-time writer, as well as a certified member of the Grammar Police. – Stephanie M. 4 months ago
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  • To judge by the sheer volume of helpful notes attached to this topic suggestion, you have really opened the proverbial 'can of worms', or perhaps that should be Pandora's Box! Much of what I would have suggested has already been covered by previous commentators - so whomever takes on this subject will have rich pickings from which to draw. We only need look at some of the comments made in response to You Tube videos to see just how poor the grasp of basic written English can be and 'text speak' frequently hides this fact. Maybe it's because I'm 'Old School', but I have to side with StephanieM on this issue. However, somewhat ironically, I do use textspeak a lot when texting close friends, but only because it's economical. Regarding the demise of punctuation marks - the one that will never disappear is the exclamation mark! Texters love to overuse it!! Don't they? !?!!!!? – Amyus 4 months ago
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13

How travel can inspire writing (Both fiction and non-fiction)

When suddenly placed in a new location our brains tend to do funny things. We inhale air we have never tasted, brush our fingers along foreign rock, and bath our eyes in completely new sights. Something about travel bungles our minds. It’s as if we’ve received an electric shock and our neurons have gone nutty, rearranging themselves to create new thought patterns. Of course this doesn’t literally happen but change in environment and routine can cause us to think differently, making new synapses in our brains. Travel can introduce a new perspective, one we’ve never thought of before, or provide fascinating characters that we never would have found from our couches. When we find ourselves somewhere new we tend to pay more attention to everything around us. Our heightened sense of awareness reveals things we might not have noticed if we lived there. Travel can perhaps be described as shock therapy. Removing oneself from an everyday routine can be utterly refreshing, especially for a writer.

  • This is a really cool topic. Maybe to make it a more focused discussion, give some examples of authors who were inspired by places. It is a little broad so giving an example of a book that was inspired by a place or by travel will help. – birdienumnum17 7 months ago
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  • I can relate to this. Every time I travel I make sure to bring a fresh notepad and a good stack of pens. Being in a new environment is great for making you feel inspired. – TheK3 7 months ago
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  • Without travel, we are prisoners to our own lives. Trapped within our schedules, just another pawn of society. Travel provides an escape to the systematic mundanities of life. – finmb99 7 months ago
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  • This sounds like a very fascinating topic. I know from personal experience that travelling has enabled me to think of many ideas for plot, historical settings and character development, and can assist in painting more accurate context for works that are set in other countries and/or time periods. – SophIsticated 7 months ago
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  • Yes, travelling can make for more interesting stories because you are able to relate to the place better after visiting it. Also if you are creating a fictional place you can still that place as the backdrop to you fictional place. – Sazadore 7 months ago
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  • Writing freed the mind from the burden of memory, led to development of more rational, and reflective thought, and allowed for communication beyond the limitations of space and time. Next level is accessible due to the development of the Internet: we can combine writing with pictures, animations and sound. – seadspuzic 7 months ago
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  • I love the idea of this topic. Every time I travel to new places, I scramble to put down notes of everything I encounter - sights, sounds, tastes... There's nothing like being in a new country immersed in another culture to get the creativity flowing, especially when you dig a little deeper and research the history of the places you're going to as this can lead to more interesting stories. – CandiceLocklee 7 months ago
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  • excellent topic choice, I find travelling has a similar effect on me. Dreams become far more vivid and memorable; due to the amount of new experiences had in the daytime. The constant refreshing of ones surroundings provides a writer with inspiration for creative thought, giving a writer the basis for; a new storey, character or setting. Travelling distorts the senses in a really fascinating way, our eyes see unusual things, we hear different languages constantly, our pallet processes new flavours whilst whiffing pungent odours. I think it often parallels psychedelic drug experiences like LSD, explaining why the effects are known as: 'tripping'. – Iliasbakalla 7 months ago
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  • Agree traveling allows you to experience other cultures. If you're an Artist, writer etc. Bringing knowledge outside of where one lives helps expand our minds and become more in tune with other people in the world. – rghtin2be 3 weeks ago
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  • In the 19th century in Britain there was a rise of what was known as the travelogue - a travel novella that was aimed at capturing both the exotic wider lands of the world, but also reinforces the superiority of the British citizen. One of the first spoofs of this is HG Wells' The Island of Dr. Moreau. I think when we talk about the travel novel we also need to comment on the issue of the author lens - the interpretation of experiences and culture through the contextual background of the author's own background. Looking at post-colonial literature theory in relation to travel novels can be both enlightening and depressing for this reason, but I think it is still an area that needs careful consideration. Just a thought. – SaraiMW 3 weeks ago
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7

Do producers/writers feel the need to place minorities in their stories?

In 2017, whenever we watch a film and all the heroes are white-looking, and all the villains are black-looking, there is a problem. This is very racist, and not supported by fans.

We now see more minorities being the heroes of the stories or the "companion" of the hero. However, do people do this with a genuine intention? Or do they place these heroes strategically so no one complains?

We still see the main hero to be mainly white males in most stories, but there seems like there is a pressure to put minorities and I am wondering if these minorities were actually supposed to be there, and not placed there from pressure of current society. As a minority, I’d like to see stories where the main hero is a minority, but that these stories are genuine and that it was supposed to be like that from the beginning.

  • Having just graduated film school as a Producer, this discussion has come up quite often. There is no definitive answer, and yes, sometimes the minority is merely a marketing tool to broaden the audience of a film so that it grosses more money.Stereotypes are also an issue, case in point being the most recent Mummy remake. The actress cast as the mummy was in fact African/Egyptian, and people were up in arms that the film was "white-washing" the story. Something that happens in Australia (more frequently than I'd like), is that aboriginal actors will lose out on roles because they are "stereotypically" aboriginal - every race has various skin tones. Again, this all comes down to marketing - American distributors will take on an Australian film which asserts our "bushland/Dundee" ways, over something more contemporary. Knowing this, it is a grey area of racism. The creators aren't actively being racist, or placing a token (insert racial background here) character. What they're wanting is the marketing, which will allow them to get the notoriety to film something that is closer to their heart down the line.9/10 times though, a script is typical written without any racial descriptors because it is up to the director's creative vision to determine who the character can be best portrayed as. One thing I learnt from screenwriting is that this, along with age, is best left out.It's frustrating, especially as a fresh filmmaker who wants to make stories about a broad range of characters. But until you have funding, and interest in distributors, a lot of the time we have to bite the bullet. Funnily enough the largest demographic who still go to movies are white women between ages 28-45, so basically mothers. Marketing, it's what Hollywood is built on, nowadays storytelling is left to film students and indie cinemas. – Joshua Haines 4 weeks ago
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  • I think it's important to have diversity in your writers and directors, not just the characters. If all of your writers and directors are straight white males, it makes sense that minority characters will feel forced. Producers are sadly a bit averse to hiring minority writers and directors, which is why, for example, Wonder Woman was amazing in her standalone film directed by Patti Jenkins but falls apart under Zack Snyder. – sikemeay 2 weeks ago
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  • When I am writing something, I like to include people of all sorts. Whether my characters be LGBT, from countries around the world or other racial groups (commonly represented or otherwise), disabled, etc, it has nothing to do with being inclusionary for the sake of it, but rather that diverse casts leads to diverse stories. – Dominick White 2 weeks ago
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6

Does social media enhance or hinder our communication skills?

It could be argued that communication is the central component of human life. It is necessary for every function of society, and verbal communication is what sets us apart from other species on Earth. With advancements in technology, communication has become easier than ever before. A person on the other side of the world can be reached in an instant, with the click of a button. There are however complications with online communications. Implications of messages are sometimes misconceived; there is an absence of gestures, tones and human actions that help translate meaning. The response of social media is to introduce Emojis, which help to counter these absences.

The ease of online communication could be seen to discourage people from participating in real life human interaction. It could be argued that the emergence of online dating positively or negatively impacts romance. Voice your opinion on the matter and answer the question, "Does social media enhance or hinder our communication skills?".

  • Social media has allowed for people to form real life friendships with people they would have never met otherwise. Friendships with people with similar interests which I believe enhances communication skills. – amberhall 7 months ago
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  • Social media acts as another facet to communication and gives us a wider platform on communication, considering all positives and negatives. – Paris Williment 7 months ago
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  • I do believe that Social Media does have its place in society but many people are becoming addicted to social media and it is starting to affect relationships and work prospects. – Sazadore 7 months ago
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  • I acknowledge that there are negatives in communicating so easily and regularly on social media and it is that it can negatively impact our own social skills in everyday environments. However, I think it's important to see the benefits it has for people who lack the skills to communicate as easily as everyone else. People with anxiety, depression and other disorders benefit from it immensely as they can chat with people regularly online. It provides an environment safe and secure enough for them to not feel anxious, yet also provides them with the communication essential for healthy human development. It's a stepping stone for them. – Sidney 6 months ago
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  • In theory social media is great: A chance to meet interesting people from around the world and share ideas. In reality, it is being used as an Orwellian tool to stifle any kind of conversation (even down to unpopular opinions of books, film and TV); and because the whole thing is some faceless person on a computer, it's so easy to dehumanise people with different opinions so we don't feel bad when we publicly shame them, or get fired from their real life jobs. It's not particularly social. – AGMacdonald 5 months ago
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1

How tropes can be a valuable writing tool to help create compelling characters.

Look into how using specific tropes can help a writer to make their characters more recognisable for their target audience. Discuss how tropes are often used in mainstream media in order to quickly assemble a cast of characters and how playing with peoples expectations of tropes makes for engaging storytelling

  • Website http://www.seofreetips.net/blog Business Email admin@seofreetips.net About Me:- I am Internet marketer, blogger and social media expert I share my knowledge about SEO at seofreetips.net Ask me any question related to SEO, Link Building and Online Money making. FB Profile: - https://www.facebook.com/seo457 Twitter:- https://twitter.com/nekrajb1 Google Plus https://plus.google.com/+NekrajBhartiyaBoss Intagram https://instagram.com/nekrajB Wordpress https://bloggingtoolreview.wordpress.com/ Tumblr http://seofreetips.tumblr.com/ Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVGxDRvKsxhwptSqQ8ALPbQ Pinterest https://pinterest.com/nekrajbhartiya LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/nekraj-bhartiya-74a4b7112/ – seofreetips 4 months ago
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Published

Can you truly fall in love with a fictional character?

Analyse a human being’s ability to fall in love with a character – written, portrayed or presented in any form – despite the fact that that character can never acknowledge that person or return their love. In essence; is it possible to love a fictional character unrequitedly.

  • A truly fascinating topic. One reason someone might fall in love with a character is because the story that character was in helped that person through tough times. I and many other people go through rough spots in our daily lives, and we often escape reality through a book, or a TV show, or what ever else . We might attach ourselves to a specific character because we feel they fill in a gap in our real lives that is surely lacking. Maybe a character made us laugh, cry, or inspire bravery we never knew we had inside ourselves. – Aaron Hatch 2 years ago
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  • Fictional characters are never completely "fictitious" in nature. As readers we often find ourselves related to them in way or another. To take superheroes for example, apart from their powers, their life struggles are never too far from our own challenges. – aferozan 2 years ago
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  • This seems like it would be incredibly interesting. As readers, we get to know the main character of a novel incredibly intimately, more so than any other character in the story. I suppose it depends largely on one's definition of love, but we certainly have powerful emotional attachments to these characters. – Null 2 years ago
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  • Fictional characters can be every bit as well fleshed-out as any real person in our lives, I think. It is the depth of a character that allows someone to experience a depth of emotions in relation to that character. But is love possible? I don't know myself, which I suppose is what makes this an intriguing concept for me. If I were to posit a single question, I would have to wonder whether someone could ever love someone that would be completely unable to ever react to their own presence. People fall in love with fictional characters all the time--it's a big reason why some relationships fail, I think--the misperception and misrepresentation of someone as something desirable to that person. The real question at hand is whether it can be love when this very "person" does not even truly exist outside of a limited fantasy world. I wonder if you could maybe find instances of this? Or perhaps case studies related to the topic? Most certainly, you'd have to relate someone's personal feelings for a fictional character, and whether or not those feelings truly exist. – Farrow 2 years ago
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  • Absolutely, it is the safest way to fall in love. All the vicarious pleasure and non of the pain! – Munjeera 2 years ago
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  • This is an amazing topic. Seriously, really, really cool. I think it's definitely possible, especially, and the writer of this topic may want to touch upon this, if the person who is falling in love is the actual author of the story. – Jaye Freeland 2 years ago
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  • I really like this idea. I think the concept of "love" here would be a bit different, naturally, from the bond between two real people. You could explore how it may be comforting or maybe build confidence when someone finds interest in a fictional character. In other words, it can possibly help prepare them for a relationship in real life perhaps. – Filippo 2 years ago
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  • I would love to see the examples you use to analyze someone's ability to fall in love with a ficitonal character. I think perhaps going from different aspects (film, movies, novels,) would be a great approach. I think it's definitely possible especially with some of the fanfiction I've read in recent years. – alexusariana 2 years ago
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  • I wouldn't say truly, I would call it more of an infatuation, since you are not getting a two sided relationship. Much like when you develop a crush on someone and you are seeing them with rose colored glasses. – Quinzel 2 years ago
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  • I think people can truly fall in love with a fictional character. As another user has mentioned, this is especially possible if the character is two-dimensional and relatable, or just overall very likable and courageous. This makes for a very interesting and fascinating topic. – enizzari 1 year ago
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  • Wow...as a literature and psychology major I am placed in a precarious situation while approaching this topic. The book lover in me wants to say, "of course you can," whereas the psychoanalytical thinking side is about to grab the DSM and see if there is a clinical diagnosis for this. I think, as with all things in life, a key facet to consider is moderation; to truly admire the qualities of a character and find them to be an incomparable being is fine. Yet, if a reader becomes so fixated with a character that they are unable to engage in a real relationship due to holding their standard of acceptable partnership based on this particular character--then this is problematic! But, when we find a character we truly love and hate to finish the last page because it means saying goodbye, this is the bittersweet beauty of writing that we all hope to emulate. – danielle577 1 year ago
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  • Courtly (not Courtney) love, anyone? Seems similar since the public self is not the private self. – Tigey 1 year ago
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  • Yes. It is absolutely possible. How do I know? I've been dealing with this for almost 9 years of my life. I thought that after a few years of growing up and maturing, I'd be out of all of that, but it's still here, and I'm about to turn 20 years old. I'm not claiming to be all mentally stable, as I can perfectly tell it's not normal, nor sane; I know this because I've read about some people claiming to ''be in love'' with a character, but it's, at least in all cases I've read of, superficial, and it's over a few months later. For me... it's a tad more complicated. I don't really know how to explain it myself, but someone above said this: ''The real question at hand is whether it can be love when this very "person" does not even truly exist outside of a limited fantasy world.'' and I feel I can answer this perfectly. In order for the ''romance'' to work, one would have to live inside of that fantasy world, or at least in a way, ''bring it'' to reality. Take the character, and adapt it to our daily lives, and constantly imagine his/her reaction to given situations, even if he or she's not really there. I know it sounds crazy. But it was something that I couldn't control. It was as if my mind was working autonomously, and to be honest, I loved the feeling, because those ''crushes'' wouldn't last a few months, but years. I had trouble dealing with reality, and I became obsessive more than once, in an incredibly high level. I used to feel the character's presence all the time, as if I had to ''prove'' I was worthy of him. I used to fuel my feelings by learning about that character, so I could properly imagine his reactions, as if he was real. And then, I could get all the ''reciprocation'' in my mind, all the time, even without asking for it. I know, it's totally mental. As of now, I've learned how to control this, and it doesn't nearly affect me like to that level anymore. But I guess I can find a reason why I used to feel all of this. I've tested myself and got Avoidant Personality Disorder in the past; I was incredibly self-conscious, and had extremely low self-esteem. It was a long way, but I guess falling in love with characters was a way of coping with this, all this lack of love I've always felt I had. As I said, it still happens to me, but I more or less know how to control it, and I don't even feel anxious, or all that stuff anymore. Still, it was incredibly hard for me to walk away from all of this, as no one ever thought it was a pathology (I can clearly see it was, of some sort, as I didn't feel it was very natural), merely a very funny and peculiar characteristic of me, and I've never found any other case of it, at least not like mine. I guess people never knew it was a problem for me, because I've always acted very happy and ''cutely-obssesive'' over those characters I used to be in love with, but... Yes, it is possible, though I wouldn't wish it for anyone the way it happened to me. Beside all the happiness one could get by ''feeling loved'', it comes with a pretty messed up secondary effects, really. – IsabellaGranger 1 year ago
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  • IsabellaGranger I am currently going through the same thing. I lost the feelings I had for my girlfriend when I fell in love with the character. – AidenBender 1 year ago
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  • I'm currently experiencing this, it's been 5 years. It's so severe I decided to never find "real life" love because I'm just... Not interested. No one compares to him. Nobody understands and I don't even dare to explain, honestly I'm just wishing to die. Loving someone so much and never see him it's not worth it, but I can't seem to forget him. I'm so ashamed of me for getting myself being this ill and never did anything to get "normal"... – Crossinguniverse 12 months ago
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  • This has happened to me a variety of times with video game characters not to the extreme of denying a potential mate but I have always wanted to fall in love at some point in life and no person has ever (that I know of) felt the same way about me and I tend to gravitate to fictional video game characters. I currently have it very strongly with a character and I think its my fault that i got back into this feeling for playing this particular game (farming living a peaceful life and finding someone to marry and giving gifts to make them fall for you). This has really made me think non stop about this character who shares the same feeling that I have for her. And believe me i really wish I could completely erase these feelings away but they are very strong right now, I just hope that in a month or two I completely loose them because loving someone that doesn't even exist is very painful. So all in all I think its very possible to fall in love with fictional characters because its happened to me many times. – N8004 11 months ago
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  • Cogito ergo sum my friend, the only one truth If you think outside the box reality is just another fiction and fiction is just another reality, yes you can fall in love with a fictional character but you can't create any bonds – Sham 11 months ago
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  • Guys... If you happen to be going through this right now...Please send a PM to my facebook account adressing the problem...I'm still going through this too, and I feel I kind of retraced my steps into mentality again... I can't seem to completely let go of it and it worries me, but I feel maybe talking about it can help us all. We could do a helping group of some sort. My facebook is Isabella Granger, I'll add the link below if you want to message me and see if we can help each other. https://m.facebook.com/isabella.granger.16?ref=m_notif&notif_t=wall – IsabellaGranger 9 months ago
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  • I will fill this array, it happened to me too. For me it's maybe different from you, since I'm a guy, married, got kids, still fell in love with fictional woman. I love my wife a lot and it happened I got close to the lady off story. Than I realized I feel unusual towards her, almost same when I met my wife, yet different. Life story of this lady somehow resembles mine from past off younger age and then how it unravel and so one on so forth, it just happened. This woman is different from my wife, got less valuable everything than my wife, kinda rebel - devil - like my younger me, contrary angelic nature of my wife. Since I changed later on, seems old habits reside my memory. I'm fascinated not so much by those feelings rather the fact its possible in terms of psychology. I mostly take logical stances towards opinions and this is more fascinating than anything especially due empathy. Anyway I decided not to feel bad for this, rather fully submit to this for purpose of testing my mind. Plus it feels great, I'm somehow happy all the time my eyes are open, want to sing all day, everything is awesome. Everyone noticed I changed a bit, not so gloomy, smiling, less stressed, sleep better... Miracle or curse, have yet to discover. At least my next love doesn't argue about my scientific intentions :) – Khimari 8 months ago
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  • I have yet to find a Della Street in real life. – Antonius865 5 months ago
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  • I really want to see this topic investigated and researched in more depth. I think it would be important to look into the psychology of love and the variety of emotions that accompany each type. The love I have for my mother or best friend is not the same as a male or female fictional character. However, is one more superior or more valid than the other?Why do we feel connected to certain characters? Are they some kind of archetype for people in our lives? Perhaps they represent what we are personally missing.Interested in what others think. – Emily 2 months ago
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  • you can fall in love with the idea of the character as being real. We all have a fantasy of a person that we would like to be with – Karenwest8 2 weeks ago
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  • I doubt any true research could be done on this topic, because the variables are too great. Just the definition of "falling in love with a fictional character" means different things to different people, and is experienced differently by all those above who have experienced it.One definition of "falling in love" I've found on the Web is one by Fredric Neuman, who states the following: "Let me define falling in love as well as I can, so we know what we are talking about. One person finds himself/herself excited and preoccupied with someone else and desirous of touching that person and being with that person as much as possible. That strong physical attraction usually includes sexual feelings. There is a frequent desire to share thoughts and experiences, even trivial experiences. It is a headlong, pleasurable feeling that, everyone seems to agree, colors judgment so that the loved person is not seen clearly. Vague fantasies of a dramatic nature enter into the lover’s thoughts. The rest of life fades a little behind this dramatic daydream. It is as if there is a magnetic attraction to the other person that transcends rational thought. It is so powerful that, like other powerful feelings, such as grief, it seems to the affected person that it will last forever. It is the sort of thing people write songs about."The above is probably true for the infatuation phase of falling in love. It's a chemical reaction that eventually fades into attachment and companionship. If it's true love, then when the infatuation is done with, the attachment still remains. If someone falls in love for a few months or a year with a character, then moves on to another one, then maybe it was just a temporary "fling", like in real life.But I think the author of the subject above meant the love that comes after the infatuation. I think it's possible for a lot of people to fall into infatuation with a fictional character, but to actually fall in love, to be attached for years and years to the same character, even after it's not all butterflies anymore?All I can say is that, from personal experience, it's possible.I've only been in love with one fictional character, and it's been fourteen years. I also need to mention that presently I've been in a stable and happy real-life relationship for the past four years. Before that, I've had a few other normal relationships too.But when I first "met" that character 14 years ago, I couldn't even fathom a real life relationship for about five to six years. That character did not consume my life; I wasn't obsessed with him every single second of every day. I had other personal hobbies and social events that I enjoyed, during which I did not think of him at all. But I thought of him often. I could easily picture him in the bus next to me, or across the table from me. I could picture conversations with him, especially at night in bed, talking about my day, him talking about his day. In moments when I needed encouragement or comfort, I could picture him saying the words to me, and I felt much better afterwards, ready to tackle whatever obstacle.When I thought of him, my feelings were as real to me as anything I've felt after him. He was my first love. I didn't know what love was back then, so I just thought it was some teenage obsession that would fade in time. Except it never did, even to this day. I've fallen in love with two real men after him. Each was different, but each time I knew it was love. Presently, I'm very happy and in love with my boyfriend. But that's also why I know it was also "love" with that character. In fact, because of the fictional nature of him, it's the most perfect love of the three.Nowadays, I think less about him, but when I do, it is with the same fondness as fourteen years ago. I can still picture him clearly with me if I want to. For example, today I haven't thought of him at all, but now as I write about him here, I feel the same rush, the same love, I've always felt. I think, just as a first love, he will always stay with me until the day I die.Due to his nature, ours is a bond that is special. I always thought time would erode this bond, but so far it is still as vibrant as it's always been. And truly I'm thankful for it. I would never wish it to be otherwise. I consider my life to be better because of what I experienced and continue to experience with him. Whether it's delusion or something else, it doesn't hurt anyone. Not me nor my present relationship. So it's all good in my book.Not sure if sharing this helped to shed any light on the subject, but I hope it did. – burningsunset 2 days ago
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