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Gender Roles and Sexuality in New Blockbuster Films

Analyze how the portrayal of gender roles and sexuality has changed during the last years and how it has changed in recent blockbuster films. For example the inclusion of a homosexual character in Disney’s Beuty and a Beast (2017) and in the upcoming Power Rangers (2017) film.

  • I do love the topic, and though I feel like a lot of people have tried to tackle this, the fact that you are limiting this to blockbusters might take this discussion into a slightly different direction than usual (aka whoever writes this won't necessarily focus on the tragic gay story that dominated indie movies, or the recent "burn your gays" movement in TV shows. Though, even those might have their place, so I'd leave that to the writer's discretion). That being said, I'm thinking whoever writes this might like to focus the topic some more considering that even in the blockbuster realm, different genres of movies have different histories that point to various forms of progress/regress. Beauty and the Beast, for instance, might speak to the way representation of LGBT peeps is (very) tentatively making its way into children's movies, while the Power Rangers might open the discussion about how homosexuality might/might not challenge the hyper masculinity of male heros and the hypersexuality of female ones for instance (I have yet to see either, so these are mostly guesses, but it still feels like both movies could potentially lead to different discussions). In any case, I still think its a super relevant topic today and welcome more discussions on the matter. For Disney, their "easter egg" gay man in Frozen could be used for contrast when establishing a timeline, and in superheros, the erasure of Mystic's bisexuality and Deadpool's one being still pending could be interesting to look at. – Rina Arsen 5 days ago
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The Significance of Live-Action Remakes of Classic Cartoons

Recent years have witnessed the emergence of live-action remakes of classic Disney films including Cinderella (2015), Maleficient (2014), The Jungle Book (2016), and Beauty and the Beast (2017). The trend is ongoing, with Disney planning many more adaptations in the coming years. Can the popularity of live-action remakes be reduced to nostalgia, or is it reflective of a lack of creativity on the part of studios? On the other hand, do live-action remakes offer something new to viewers, and does the genre provide opportunities for filmmakers to explore new themes?

  • This is a question that's been dwindling in the back of my mind for some time. I've mostly assumed this to be a lack of creativity and a need for more income but I would be very interested to see what live-action remakes have to offer. Given that the author has done their research and looked into all the possible aspects of this prompt I think it could be a very good article and may conjure some good discussion. – ReidaBookman 3 days ago
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  • I think there is definitely something to be gained here. A place to start would be the change of the elephants in the live action Jungle Book. The singing marching tanters (who are enjoyable) are transformed into animals perceived as gods in their jungle. This contrast provides an interesting view, and would make for great discussion. – McCooper 10 hours ago
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Can soundtracks make or break films?

A great soundtrack is so much more than just a collection of good songs. It can pull the story along while somehow effortlessly blending into the background. The right one often helps define a movie. Analyse the effect the much-recognised soundtracks had in such films as Forrest Gump, Drive, The Departed, Pulp Fiction, The Dark Knight and others.

  • Great topic! I would recommend choosing around three examples for clarity (one that works because of the score, one that doesn't work because of the score, one that is strengthened by the score). Also, score VS soundtrack, which did you mean? The score is in the film, the soundtrack is a supplementary collection, typically for advertising. – m-cubed 7 days ago
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  • Interesting topic...Would be great to do an analysis on animated movies vs live-action, and whether that plays a role in how important the soundtrack is??? – MikeySheff 7 days ago
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  • I buy soundtracks based on their content of music acquired by production. I have several soundtracks in my current Vinyl record collection. If you collect them always purchase VINYL RECORDINGS when available you will be glad you did. – WilliamBailey 6 days ago
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Exploring the concept of time in Tarkovsky's films.

Analyse the passing of time and how it is depicted in Tarkovsky’s films. How is the concept of time relevant to the overall poetry of the work?

  • Great topic! This probably goes without saying, but whoever tries to tackle this should definitely read Sculpting in Time. He shares a lot of great insights in there, and it really changes the way you experience the films. – ProtoCanon 2 weeks ago
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In the run up to mothers day (UK) who are some of the best movie mothers.

In the run up to mothers day what better way to prepare than by reconnecting with some of our favourite movie mothers who have had an influence on use as much as our real relatives. From Maria in the sound of music to ‘the cool mum’ Mrs. George in mean girls who are some of your favourite movie mums?

  • Could this be expanded to TV moms as well? I can think of several, from Clair Huxtable and Hariette Winslow (Cosby Show, Family Matters) to Lorelai Gilmore (Gilmore Girls) and Annie Camden (7th Heaven). Some favorite movie moms of mine are Eudora (Tiana's mom from The Princess and the Frog), Vianne (Chocolat), Helen Harris (Raising Helen), and the moms from The Joy Luck Club. – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
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  • The mom from The Wonder Years is also a good pick for TV.In movies I would pick the mom from Queen of Katwe, mom of chess champ who struggles with giving the best to her genius daughter. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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The Next Step in the Horror Film Industry

What do filmmakers of the horror genre need to do to improve its reception and future in cinemas? I’m not a fan of horror films; my imagination and perception when watching films doesn’t allow me to enjoy them enough. But when I hear about a new horror movie release, there isn’t much praise that follows. It Follows is the most recent movie I’ve heard of that gained great appreciation as a horror film for how it differed itself from other horror movies. Instead of making sequels or prequels to existing horror movie films, would it be better if each new film was of a new subject and story entirely? Would horror films have a better chance if they weren’t sequels and covered a new idea or concepts others before them have yet to?

  • Well, it's easier said than done to say every new movie should cover a new subject or story. There will always be overlap or elements which have been done before. What makes a genre is the repetition of specific characteristics. I'd say there are so many sequels etc. because companies just want to milk the fandom until it's dry, not because they expect it to do as well as the original. You say that mentality is hurting the industry and I'd agree to that. At what point does it become too much? – Slaidey 4 months ago
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  • I'm a major horror film fan and think about this question all the time. Particularly because most popular horror subgenres can often be applied to specific decades (we went from slashers, to torture-porn, to the supernatural). Would be interesting to consider what the next big theme of horror will be. – Sonia Charlotta Reini 3 months ago
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  • I am a fan of horror films, but i must agree i think each new film should have a different story line. I like to expect the unexpected, i need an unfamiliar plot. – bdh202 2 weeks ago
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The Implications of Carrie Fisher's Death in the Star Wars Franchise

After the passing of its iconic and lovable star Carrie Fisher, the makers of Star Wars have reached a standstill about how to respectfully write out her character of Princess Leia. Consider the ethical, technological, and creative methods by which Fisher’s memory can be served in a series built on a foundation of visual breakthroughs in film.

  • This will be huge for Episode 9, as Carrie Fisher supposedly finished her scenes for Episode 8. This article will be relevant for a few years! – SeanGadus 3 weeks ago
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  • You might also look to The Fast and Furious franchise and how they responded to Paul Walker's death. They ended up using his brother as a CGI stand-in to finish some sections of the film he never was able to finish. – Nate Océan 1 week ago
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"Alice in Wonderland" in Adaptation: What Makes it so Difficult?

Lewis Carroll’s nonsense novel has seen endless variation in adaption across all forms of media, but how many of these are actually successful? Look at both the more faithful adaptions (Disney, the 1999 TV Movie), and the "darker" or somehow radically different ones (American McGee’s Alice, The Looking Glass Wars). Compare some of the adaptions which are similar in tone, like Tim Burton’s recent film and American McGee, or the Disney film and the TV Movie, with an eye for determining, which one does what it’s trying to do better (e.g., a faithful translation from book to film, a darker take), while examining what makes adaptation of this novel so difficult.

  • One of my favorite adaptations is actually the 1999 TV movie. That's likely an incredibly nostalgia-based opinion since I watched it a lot during my early childhood. Nevertheless, it's one of my favorites because it still retains the intelligence of the book. I wasn't a huge fan of the Tim Burton version (although I still haven't seen the sequel yet) since it was more of a fantasy action-adventure story involving good versus evil. For me, it lacked a bit of Lewis Carroll's signature wit whereas the 1999 version did a good job of showing just how ridiculous and nonsensical the adult world can be through the eyes of a child. – aprosaicpintofpisces 4 months ago
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  • You could also reference the difficulties of crafting a screenplay, which follows many story rules, compared to the wandering nature of Alice in Wonderland. Think of The Wizard of Oz--it has a similar path, but the character journey and story structure are quite traditional. ALICE takes more liberties. – Nate Océan 1 week ago
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