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Latest Topics

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Guardians of the Galaxy versus Destiny Guardians

There are two kinds of guardians of the galaxy. The first is portrayed in the movie with Starlord, Gamorra, Groot and Rocket. The other guardians are portrayed in the game Destiny. Memes have been circulated on social media lately hypothesising which group of guardians are the coolest. Destiny, you and a fire team take on hoards of enemies and constantly take on boss levels to push back the darkness and restore the travellers light. In the movie, a band of four misfits come together to stop tyrants from taking over or destroying the galaxy. A critical reflection of our humanistic desire for good to overcome evil – who would you prefer to fight this battle for you?

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    Exploring Hollywood's Obession with the Prequel

    Filmmaking is a business. Hollywood knows that, and so does the general population. For a long time, Hollywood has been ensuring guaranteed hits by extending already existing popular franchises. This would traditionally take the form of a sequel like Die Hard 2; Mad Max 2; Terminator 2 (you get where I am going with this), but in recent years there has been a number of prequels cropping up: Fantastic Beasts, Star Wars, Terminator, Star Trek (both the new films and the upcoming television series). This article would explore the idea of why Hollywood thinks prequels are such a marketable storytelling device? Is it because people love throwbacks and little Easter eggs? Do we love a good origin story? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

    • Yes! I'm very excited for this topic. Part of me wonders if prequels aren't the new sequels. Perhaps the film industry is counting on our nostalgia for popular franchises to make more money. Or perhaps people feel like the original film starting in the wrong place. Maybe we simply have unanswered questions that could only be remedied by a prequel. I'm curious to see what people think! – ReidaBookman 4 days ago
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    The Rise of the Fast and the Furious

    Analyse the impact of the Fast and the Furious film franchise on cinema-going audiences and film buffs worldwide. The continued success of each film at the box office and their potential to rake in millions worldwide as well as the non-stop sequels being released every other year.

    • Fast and Furious has been criticized but box office returns have demonstrated over and over again that the actors have tremendous appeal. I hope whoever writes on this topic notes the increasing interest of female audiences and their loyalty for this actions franchise. – Munjeera 1 week ago
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    • Preferably be a little less vague than "analyze the impact," but interesting topic. – m-cubed 6 days ago
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    • It is interesting that it didn't seem to get its blockbuster status until somewhere around the fourth or fifth film. Not bad movies, but I gave up after The Rock broke his arm cast with his muscles in F7. I enjoy mindless action films as much as the next person, but even I have my limits. – AGMacdonald 6 days ago
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    Let's discuss the No Man's Land scene in Wonder Woman (2017)

    We now live in a post-Wonder Woman live-action film world, and it’s glorious. However, Wonder Woman cinematographer Matt Jensen revealed in a recent interview that the now-iconic No Man’s Land scene almost didn’t make the cut. What do you think about that? What effect did that scene have on you? (Personally, I’ve watched the film four times now, and I still cry every time I watch that scene. I come out of the theatre wanting to flip cars!!!)

    • This is an amazing piece of film. It has amazing music and it plays a huge role in Wonder Woman's development as a hero! – Sean Gadus 1 week ago
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    • If someone from film would take it on, perhaps. I'm not sure what it does aesthetically or narratively. That's not to say it doesn't have precisely the sort of emotional impact or resonance with viewers you describe, of course. Whether someone could write a tenable essay on affect in that scene is questionable, I think. I'm confident someone could write an essay deconstructing the scene technically. – Paul A. Crutcher 1 week ago
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    • The scene can be analyzed through the lens of how difficult it is for women to express themselves publicly. Since this movie is the first superhero blockbuster with a female lead (not counting Catwoman) and the first to be directed by a woman, you can go into some detail on Patty Jenkins and her process making the film. Or even analyze how Wonder Woman proves to her comrades, and the audience, that she is a bonafide superhero who could help end the war if given the opportunity to fight in the front lines. – Rico 2 days ago
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    Are superhero movies being overdone?

    In the last few years there have been an influx of superhero movies and they have subsequently dominated the box office. The pro-comic book inspired attitude is fairly recent but not necessarily new in terms of fandom. Things like comic-con have been going on for years, but lately they taken taken on epic proportions. Why our society crave and eat up the classic comic hero’s journey again and again and again?

    • Yes, they are but I love them anyway. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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    • Yes, the are, but I mostly dislike them anyway. An exception is the new Wonder Woman movie, which my daughter and I enjoyed quite a bit. – Ben Hufbauer 2 weeks ago
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    • Hi Ben,What about Captain America: Winter Soldier? You can't hate Captain America can you? What about Black Panther? I am waiting with bated breath for BP. The music from the trailer sounds awesome. The best soundtrack yet I am guessing. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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    • Perhaps you could discuss history f superhero fandoms and the fandoms about the superhero franchises generally. – J.D. Jankowski 2 weeks ago
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    • They're the popular way to tell the heroes journey. They're importance varies from character to character, but at the very least they'll have a solid core emotional story to them. They can be pretty simple as well. Ant-man has a nice father daughter theme in it. The Sam Raimi Spider-man films have "with great power comes great responsibility" down to a t. Also, if you're just talking about their monetary success, it's pretty simple: kids. – KyleThomson 2 weeks ago
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    • Quite broad. As others have noted, the big-ticket superheroes today have disparate origins, purposes, and journeys. The "superhero" movie subgenre might deserve some questions, but whoever wanted to tackle the questions would need to establish the themes common to the superhero journey and the outliers to those themes. That is, do *Deadpool,* *Guardians of the Galazy Vol. 2,* and *Wonder Woman* offer parallel themes? If so, what are they? – Paul A. Crutcher 1 week ago
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    • I think we have become obsessed with superheroes because we lack real heroes. Heroes in the past have fallen and it seems as if there is a disappointed generation out there. Also, these are scary times. Is it any wonder we take solace in the idea that someone will rescue us from ourselves? – Munjeera 1 week ago
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    • Every new interpretation, every re watch and every new instalment brings with it excitement, apprehension and familiarity. whats wrong with craving a bit of hope, humour and strength? – miaraszewski 1 week ago
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    • Superhero movies can be considered to be over the top and overdone. But before applying a binary yes no response to this questions, I think it would be helpful to examine this from a different paradigm. If we look at the geo-political state of the world over the last 15-20 years, things have been rapidly declining. Superhero movies offer what the real world cannot - a form of escapism that is affordable, relatable and has generated a lot of buy-in from fandom the world over. Lets be honest, we have all wished for some type of supernatural ability or power at some point in our lives to help us deal with a real world issue we were dealing with in the hopes that it would solve the problem and we would emerge victorious. We have all fantasied and wished for it at some point. Superhero movies are an extension of that inherent wish/fantasy. It is appealing to us to see average people go through a transition of some kind (spider bite/gamma radiation exposure/ being born on another planet/ or a genius tech billionaire) and able to overcome adversity of all types. – mattcarlin 5 days ago
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    Living in an Age of Nostalgia

    Analyse the trends and patterns of selling and marketing ‘nostalgic’ properties to the public. Is it an issue? Is it replacing the creation of new art, or is it simply a matter of adults celebrating the things they loved as children. Consider movie and television reboots and spin-offs.

    • Definitely a topic that never goes out of style. I saw a news report years ago about the 1950s music and fashion frenzy among teenage Japanese fans. There was a documentary not long after the Communist collapse in Russia where ardent followers of American Rock classics resurfaced onto the public domain after decades of underground existence. Need only point to the Star Trek phenomena that has ballooned into paraphernalia, conferences, movies, books, sequels, so on. There is much you can do with this subject. – lofreire 1 week ago
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    • Obsolesce, "slow" movements, craft culture, and many hipster aesthetics and ideologies -- add, and it's an interesting topic. A reaction to contemporary culture. The reboot phenomenon in the movie industry, in particular, seems less complicated and worthwhile. As does a question of "art." – Paul A. Crutcher 1 week ago
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    When do movies become too violent for the demographic that watch them?

    Movies can be said to entertain us, thrill us, scare us, and even make us cry. However, there are certain movies that reach a new level of violence that can cause nightmares, tears, and the desire to copy it and send it back out into the real world causing real harm to others just because it looked cool in a movie. When is too violent?

    • An interesting topic, and definitely one worth pursuing. It might also be interesting to see how the standards have changed. When some films from the 70s and 80s were transferred to DVD, their censorship ratings were often downgraded, particularly in regards to violence.You might also consider how Western society seems to be far more squeamish and conservative about sex (even to this day).A perfect example was seen here in Australia. Game of Thrones has been given an R rating every season except for season 3, despite this being the season containing The Red Wedding. A pregnant woman was stabbed in the stomach, and yet this was the only season (so far) to be given an MA15+ rating. So, apparently fifteen year olds can watch the murder of a unborn child, but they're not mature enough to watch characters having sex. – AGMacdonald 2 weeks ago
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    • Are we making a distinction between the demographic who watch them and the demographic who they are intended for? If a film is a incredibly violent and it's classification accurately conveys that then the demographic watching the film likely won't find it too violent. I don't quite understand your topic, unless you were to focus on something like issues with film classification, as AGMacDonald mentioned in the above comment. – LeonPatane 2 weeks ago
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    • I think people are only hit with "too violent" when the movie was improperly advertised. People dumb enough to reenact violent things from movies are going to happen, so debating the censorship of all movies ever made isn't quite helpful. I think the focus should be on movies that went too far from what viewers were made to expect, and how that impacts people. I remember liking to watch horror movies with my friends as a preteen and we popped in something we thought was strictly a suspense slasher. Blood, gore, and a little bit of soft core porn were considered acceptable. But then five to ten minutes of the movie was spent depicting rape. My friends were deeply disturbed and wanted to shut it off, for them that was "too far" whereas I agree with AGMacdonald in that our idea of certain kinds of violence over others at a certain age is terribly askew. What levels and types of violence are acceptable at not just which age rating but in which genres? – Slaidey 2 weeks ago
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    • As someone in the filmmaking world, I don't ever want to tell someone to "tone down" their movies. I think movies are great ways of communicating something important in an entertaining way. But I agree with Slaidey, they need to be properly advertised. Also, I think if you are someone who knows they will be offended by strong violence, it's your job to find out before watching a movie if it's going to offend you and then make a decision as to whether you will watch it or not. Good topic, I think it's one worth pursuing. – maxxratto 1 week ago
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    Existentialist shenanigans in Woody Allen films

    A detailed analysis of the existentialist nature of films by Woody Allen. It’s pretty interesting how many of his films challenge contemporary societal issues through existentialist ideologies. This article could be a break down of his various films and the manner in which they explore ideas relating to existence and the meaning of life, often in a comical manner. From Bananas to Annie Hall to the more recent Cafe Society, Woody Allen films are typically incredibly humorous whilst also a great insight into the meaninglessness of life. What you all think?

    • I would love it if someone explained Woody Allen. I have never gotten the appeal. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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    • Perhaps a disclaimer could be written to focus on the movies only and not his personal life. I was never a fan and his point often escaped me anyway. – Munjeera 2 weeks ago
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    • That's a good point Munjeera! I feel like often the point of his films can go over your head. They're not necessarily supposed to be extremely thought-provoking or anything (excluding Interiors and a few others) but they still have that reoccurring theme of existentialism which I personally quite enjoy and find very interesting. – ninaphillips27 2 weeks ago
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    • I take great interest in revisiting the past works of screenwriting. I felt the same way about Robin Williams; could never really engage with his early comic charades, his escapades into worlds of fantasy, and finally his masterpieces: Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting. All the pieces of that literary puzzle eventually came to light. Robins and Allen teach us that life is as jovial as it is entrenched in trivial matters--much ado about nothing--if I may. – lofreire 5 days ago
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