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The Early Formation Of The Child Performer

Modern performances rely on young actors amid outlandish worlds of fantasy and fable. It is often conveyed through technological devices such as computer graphics or scale mock-ups. But years ago, child performers had only their voice, their dancing feet, their counterpart, and a reliable stream of antics to deliver entertainment to audiences. In the tradition of Shirley Temple and Little Rascals, show how much or how little technological advancement in screenplay has impacted the burgeoning and maturing actor into a unique form or into a rambunctious version of the original model. By all means, incorporate relevant patterns of the genre by configuring actors such as Mickey Rooney (who started in silent film) into the prose, or the Brooke Shields foray into fashion, modeling, and advertising.

  • Relevant article: https://the-artifice.com/secret-life-of-shirley-temple/ – Misagh 3 months ago
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  • An interesting suggestion for an article! There's a great history of cinema to draw upon indeed, but might I also suggest widening the subject to include a look at young actors/actresses' development outside of Hollywood? – Amyus 3 months ago
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  • A lovely topic with plenty of research to draw from. I'd be especially interested in the writer's take on Shirley Temple. Both my grandmas had some of her movies, so I watched her as a kid. I liked her, but even when I was little I felt her acting was overdone and whiny. I wonder now if that was encouraged because of a lack of technology, or if today's child stars have similar problems. (Personally, I've seen some really good ones and some that can't act to save their little lives). – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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Is the discourse of text messages and abbreviated posts devolving our language?

Think about what you experience on social media and exercise whether our language is ruined or changed for the better? Should we embrace the ways of the future and look forward to books written with genius literary writing such as "yestiday i cort da bus 2 da mall 4 a shawp & lunch wid mi bffl!!!!" Will punctuation marks such as commas, apostrophes and semi colons become the way of the past whilst multiple exclamation marks and hashtags rein supreme?

  • Language does evolve. Perhaps, examples of how language has changed and how it has affected society. The writer could include reasons for language changes; such as, cultural influences or significant events that took taking place. Consequently, the writer can then address the current form of abbreviated communication. – Venus Echos 2 years ago
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  • I remember writing something on this in University, actually. I remember making the case that actually, it's the opposite. If anyone who takes this up wants to look at both sides, you could make the case that it actually takes a good command of the English language to be able to manipulate it like that, and bad spellers are much more concerned with trying to get their spellings right than manipulating the language successfully. This topic goes straight into the slang topic, from Cockney rhyming slang to internet and texting slang. It's a wide topic but very worthy of writing. – Adnan Bey 2 years ago
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  • I agree with Adnan -- language is evolving. I personally like the example of how millennials grew up with internet langauge -- first with AIM, then forum speak with loads of "epic fails" and "XD," growing up to using no shortenings, and then using shortenings ironically. "LMAO," for example, gives a different meaning than it used to when it first appeared. – ChristelleMarie Chua 2 years ago
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  • I agree it's devolving, not evolving. Yes, the simpler it gets the easier it is for less articulate people to get their point across but that simplification is resulting in a loss of language... as in, people don't know what larger words mean or how to properly spell or use grammar... The "word of the year" was an emoji, was it not? We're losing synonyms, punctuation, syntax, everything. – Slaidey 2 years ago
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  • It would be interesting to look at how educators deal with students using abbreviated words and sentences in work assignments. Do they deduct marks or consider it now mainstream enough to be acceptable language? That could be a good indicator in seeing if this abbreviated language is here to stay. – Lexzie 2 years ago
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  • I think its definitely true that abbreviation is killing the language. It is the apocalypse of Grammar – LydiaBrunet 2 years ago
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  • Wow, now this is a great topic in which I have so much to say. As a professor, I cannot even begin to discuss the amount of time spent in the syllabus, and during the first day of class, regarding the protocol of the acceptable mode of emailing. A lesson, that is unfortunately repeated in class at least one more time in the semester...If I am lucky. The emails are one thing, but regarding written assignments, I truly believe they use abbreviated "text language," out of habit. When I point this out to the student, they are usually mortified, and I therefore try not to make it a big deal, but use it as a talking point for the importance of printing out your work, reading it aloud; changing the font to see the difference; using a different screen view to gain a different perspective on one's work, etc. An entire book written in text language would drive me insane; yet, one with it intertwined in places would be fitting, and an ode to the way in which language is being used--or misused--at this point in time. – danielle577 1 year ago
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  • I think teens' culture and text speech nowadays can be helpful in a way, to make communicating more accessible to them. They have a larger sense of community now that there exists such a bigger generation gap. True -- it does make it more difficult to connect with those older than them, such as their parents. But they are more inclined to get their ideas out there, no matter how terrible they are, or how badly they are communicated. Today's technology makes it so much easier for anyone to get connected to anything, and abbreviation can definitely save time – dandeliaon 1 year ago
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  • I personally don't call it a devolution. Sure, words and phrases are getting shorter physically, a few of our best are losing syllables, but the meaning behind them has remained the same. "Text language" has its own set of rules, just like "regular English". For instance, yesterday I texted my friend a pun that I thought was absolutely hilarious. She replied with a "haha", and immediately I knew that she had not been amused.Now, if she'd replied with an "lol" or that laughing emoji, it would've been a much more positive reaction, even though all three options contain classic factors of conveying amusement. The reliance on connotation and knowing the person being contacted on at least a slightly personal level is why I don't call this shift in language a "devolution". That being said, I think the distinction between personal and professional language is important and should stick around, at least for now. I still proofread emails for proper grammar and spelling when contacting a superior or a professor, and I doubt I'll ever be comfortable sending an emoji to any of those individuals. – eschiem 1 year ago
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  • I make a distinction between the evolution of a language and the devolution of its nuanced application. It's perfectly fine for 'textspeak' to emerge as a result of modern technology–that's an evolution. However, it's an entirely different thing for people to lose their ability for nuanced communication by being too dependent on simplistic forms–that's a devolution in meaningful application. . . but lol wut do i kno??? – IsidoreIsou 1 year ago
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  • Much like eschiem said, It might be interesting to explore how the use of abbreviation actually allows language to better simulate verbal speech in text. For example "you" means something different from "u" and many young people can tell the difference. "i h8u" means something different from "I hate you" . One connotes a joking tone the other a serious statement. Its the difference between stating something plainly and saying it with a roll of the eyes. – Mariel 1 year ago
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  • Devolution or evolution, it all depends on your perception of language and culture. One thing is certain: language is constantly changing. I'm currently taking a Linguistics class called "The Nature of Language" and I had never known how altered the english language is until now. Several words that we use in every speech are shorter versions of words, words that come from names and more. Pants is short for pantaloons. Bloomers were named after Amelia J. Bloomer. I think this specific change of language, using names and truncating words is interesting and I would consider it a form of evolution. I would also consider slang a form of evolution because it provides a sense of community and helps detect a certain era of language; however, text slang which is simple severely butchered diction is not evolution in my eyes. Reducing this vast english language to a few letters and numbers is also reducing the language. – sastephens 1 year ago
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  • Personally, I hate what textspeak and technology have done to our language but then again, I'm a former English teacher and full-time writer, as well as a certified member of the Grammar Police. – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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  • To judge by the sheer volume of helpful notes attached to this topic suggestion, you have really opened the proverbial 'can of worms', or perhaps that should be Pandora's Box! Much of what I would have suggested has already been covered by previous commentators - so whomever takes on this subject will have rich pickings from which to draw. We only need look at some of the comments made in response to You Tube videos to see just how poor the grasp of basic written English can be and 'text speak' frequently hides this fact. Maybe it's because I'm 'Old School', but I have to side with StephanieM on this issue. However, somewhat ironically, I do use textspeak a lot when texting close friends, but only because it's economical. Regarding the demise of punctuation marks - the one that will never disappear is the exclamation mark! Texters love to overuse it!! Don't they? !?!!!!? – Amyus 3 months ago
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Taken by RachelFieldhouse (PM) 2 months ago.
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Ambigous Endings

I’d figure that an analysis on ambiguous ends in literature seems to warrant some serious thought.I’d like somebody to write about the psychology related to an open-ended plot..Movies could do as well.Anime is also an option

  • Do you have specific works in mind? Choosing some might help anchor the topic. – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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  • Before We Go is a great movie with an ambiguous ending. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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  • Like the ending in Kidnapped or David Copperfield? – RedFlame2000 3 months ago
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  • Looks good under the topic of writing as the discussion could be the value of an ambiguous ending using various examples of how it works in various mediums. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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  • Before We Go is a Chris Evans movie about two people who meet in New York. He is on his way to connect us with the love of his life who has become an old flame and she is deciding to end her marriage. I can't say the ending because it will be a spoiler but the ending is ambiguous. Unusual for a romantic comedy. – Munjeera 3 months ago
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  • An ambiguous ending to a novel will undoubtedly leave open the window to future renditions. Even in a happy-ending scenario, there is potential for reversal of fortune (leading to another compilation). There is always the possibility that the reader massaged the original plot into a flavor consistent to their unique palate; one the author could conceivably exploit into several more chapters, or sequels. An unresolved ending builds the kind of tension and momentum that brings loyal readership back to the watering hole, so to speak. That is not to say that critics won't take notice either, for ambiguity fuels their ire as well. – lofreire 3 months ago
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  • Damn! You beat me to it. I was going to suggest a very similar topic. On a personal note, I rather enjoy ambiguous endings or those that credit the audience with enough intelligence to work things out for themselves. We are all too often given spoon-fed answers that discourage us from thinking...and we are a thinking species after all! – Amyus 3 months ago
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  • Are ambiguous endings sometimes done so as to leave the way open for a sequel? Or it can be a sci-fi device... – JudyPeters 3 months ago
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Why study creative writing?

Many great writers never studied the craft. Today, more and more students are enrolling in creative writing degrees. Edward Delaney has written in The Atlantic, on ‘Where great writers are made’, about America’s top graduate writing programs – emphasising the importance of time (money) and something to react against. Is that it? Lynn Davidson writes movingly in her article ‘A roof over my head’ for Text journal about structure, and being part of an ongoing conversation. How has the current long apprenticeship evolved; in what ways does it tap into a tradition of writing mentorships and creative communities and what aspects might be evidence that we are seeing a different model emerging?

  • My sub major is creative writing and I would have to say, if I didn't do the introductory unit to this course I would not have found my passion and love for poetry, writing and reading in general. I believe without studying it or practising creative writing you won't achieve the best that you can achieve. You won't get a lot out of it if you did it here and there. Studying it takes it to another level and I love that. In the end a writer should not write or get published just to earn money, my tutor told me if you are going about your profession this way then you are doing it wrong. You must do it because you love it and because you want your words to be heard and read. As I said earlier, I would not have found my passion for poetry and writing if I did not do this course. You can learn so much about different authors, writing techniques and to be honest you would be surprised how much you learn about yourself also. Of course, having a mentor or someone who knows creative writing well is always a good idea. Having support is so important especially if you want to get published one day. It can be challenging at times, I've been told you will get turned down but it is part of the job and the journey. – claraaa 5 months ago
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  • I love this topic. I studied creative writing and got degrees in it, which I definitely think helped get me published. Why study creative writing? My question is, Why not? – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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  • It's always good to broaden your knowledge and hear from others, and writing skills be no different; but obviously there are people who have achieved great success without writing courses. It's really whatever works for you.It might also be interesting to look into the growing number of free online resources that emerging writers are using to train themselves. – AGMacdonald 3 months ago
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How travel can inspire writing (Both fiction and non-fiction)

When suddenly placed in a new location our brains tend to do funny things. We inhale air we have never tasted, brush our fingers along foreign rock, and bath our eyes in completely new sights. Something about travel bungles our minds. It’s as if we’ve received an electric shock and our neurons have gone nutty, rearranging themselves to create new thought patterns. Of course this doesn’t literally happen but change in environment and routine can cause us to think differently, making new synapses in our brains. Travel can introduce a new perspective, one we’ve never thought of before, or provide fascinating characters that we never would have found from our couches. When we find ourselves somewhere new we tend to pay more attention to everything around us. Our heightened sense of awareness reveals things we might not have noticed if we lived there. Travel can perhaps be described as shock therapy. Removing oneself from an everyday routine can be utterly refreshing, especially for a writer.

  • This is a really cool topic. Maybe to make it a more focused discussion, give some examples of authors who were inspired by places. It is a little broad so giving an example of a book that was inspired by a place or by travel will help. – birdienumnum17 6 months ago
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  • I can relate to this. Every time I travel I make sure to bring a fresh notepad and a good stack of pens. Being in a new environment is great for making you feel inspired. – TheK3 6 months ago
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  • Without travel, we are prisoners to our own lives. Trapped within our schedules, just another pawn of society. Travel provides an escape to the systematic mundanities of life. – finmb99 6 months ago
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  • This sounds like a very fascinating topic. I know from personal experience that travelling has enabled me to think of many ideas for plot, historical settings and character development, and can assist in painting more accurate context for works that are set in other countries and/or time periods. – SophIsticated 6 months ago
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  • Yes, travelling can make for more interesting stories because you are able to relate to the place better after visiting it. Also if you are creating a fictional place you can still that place as the backdrop to you fictional place. – Sazadore 6 months ago
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  • Writing freed the mind from the burden of memory, led to development of more rational, and reflective thought, and allowed for communication beyond the limitations of space and time. Next level is accessible due to the development of the Internet: we can combine writing with pictures, animations and sound. – seadspuzic 6 months ago
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  • I love the idea of this topic. Every time I travel to new places, I scramble to put down notes of everything I encounter - sights, sounds, tastes... There's nothing like being in a new country immersed in another culture to get the creativity flowing, especially when you dig a little deeper and research the history of the places you're going to as this can lead to more interesting stories. – CandiceLocklee 6 months ago
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  • excellent topic choice, I find travelling has a similar effect on me. Dreams become far more vivid and memorable; due to the amount of new experiences had in the daytime. The constant refreshing of ones surroundings provides a writer with inspiration for creative thought, giving a writer the basis for; a new storey, character or setting. Travelling distorts the senses in a really fascinating way, our eyes see unusual things, we hear different languages constantly, our pallet processes new flavours whilst whiffing pungent odours. I think it often parallels psychedelic drug experiences like LSD, explaining why the effects are known as: 'tripping'. – Iliasbakalla 6 months ago
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Taken by lucyviolets (PM) 2 months ago.
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Michael Douglas: Keeping the Audience Reeling

The actor Michael Douglas graduated from University of California at Santa Barbara with a degree in Drama. The real work began after an impressive portfolio of film and television roles: The Streets of San Francisco, The China Syndrome, Romancing the Stone, Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct, Black Rain, The American President, Wall Street, and The War of the Roses. He has played: detective, banker, lawyer, reporter; in both an acting capacity and as director. As if that wasn’t enough to qualify on your own merits, he is the son of famed Hollywood thespian, Kirk Douglas. But, success has no limits and Michael Douglas is proof that the territory of theater is his dominion. It is no surprise then that the University of St. Andrews in Scotland bestowed upon him an honorary Doctor of Letters degree in 2006. With a vibrant history of contribution to the arts, one must wonder–what was the allure that kept audiences flocking to the theaters and Hollywood studios beckoning with scripts? One avenue to explore could be the pressure the character has to deal with in front of the camera; crime, career, colleagues, addiction, moderation, or marriage. Who holds the key to a great performance: the scriptwriter, the actor, the circumstance, or the foil? In what way does Douglas figure against seasoned counterparts, gender-ethnic based peers, or immediate audience? Is it a matter of how willing and able the actor is to crossing boundaries (cultural, professional, geographical, personal, ideological) for the sake of the film industry, even if merely for the art? Consider this common thread of crossing material and metaphysical boundaries in the analysis.

  • Website http://www.seofreetips.net/blog Business Email admin@seofreetips.net About Me:- I am Internet marketer, blogger and social media expert I share my knowledge about SEO at seofreetips.net Ask me any question related to SEO, Link Building and Online Money making. FB Profile: - https://www.facebook.com/seo457 Twitter:- https://twitter.com/nekrajb1 Google Plus https://plus.google.com/+NekrajBhartiyaBoss Intagram https://instagram.com/nekrajB Wordpress https://bloggingtoolreview.wordpress.com/ Tumblr http://seofreetips.tumblr.com/ Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVGxDRvKsxhwptSqQ8ALPbQ Pinterest https://pinterest.com/nekrajbhartiya LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/nekraj-bhartiya-74a4b7112/ – seofreetips 3 months ago
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Indictators of talent in creative writing

There are many talented writers, but many people still argue whether it’s nature vs. nurture. Is being a good writer a mix of the two, or is it solely based on talent? Also, what are some signs of talent or potential in someone’s writing?

  • It can be a mix of the two or one or the other. Personally, I showed a talent in writing from an early age. I passed with flying colors on literature and writing exams, and was always nominated to participate in school spelling bees. As I entered college, I tried pursuing the sciences, but that eventually led me back to writing. This is a great topic, but I feel as if there isn't a particular answer simply because it varies from person-to-person. Some individuals don't realize their talent until much later in their lifetime, where as for others it can be during adolescence. – Marina 1 year ago
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  • Very true. It is a mix of both talent and hard work ethic. – Afanos 1 year ago
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  • The answer is fairly simple - it's is a mix of both nature and nurture. Understanding the answer is a little more difficult. Writing is a hard skill and can be taught to just about anyone. However within this hard skill are many soft skills like creativity and problem solving which can not always be taught. That's why the degrees of good writing vary so widely and why we cannot say for certain that everyone is good by nature or even that everyone can one day be good by nurture. – ashleyab 10 months ago
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  • Some is definitely nature; I've loved books and words since I was a little kid. But no writer ever reaches his or her potential without mentoring. Additionally, writers are always going to have different sub-gifts. One might be gifted at dialogue while another is better at setting, or one writer's talent might lend itself to poetry over fiction. Much of what is considered "creative writing" can't be taught strictly speaking, but can be nurtured. – Stephanie M. 10 months ago
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  • Both Stephanie M. and ashleyab have very good points. I think the experience varies from writer to writer and each person contains a slightly different nature to nurture ratio. Personally, I have always been attracted to rich stories. Creating characters, scenarios, and dialogue seemed to come naturally but I had to be taught to write it down effectively. – ReidaBookman 8 months ago
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  • I'm inclined to be suspicious of the word "talent" because it is subjective and also kind of disregards the amount of hard work that goes into learning a skill, writing included. There's also no accounting for taste - given that taste is a cultural construct, what we regard as talented changes from group to group, community to community etc. The "nature VS nurture" question could be an angle from which to examine the question of indicators of skill, but I'd want to stress to anyone writing this article that it can also be a deceptively binary question; the answer is almost always some variation of "both". – Cat 4 months ago
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Is Fanfiction for Real Writers Too?

Fifty Shades of Grey originated as a fanfiction online of the Twilight series in an alternate universe. It’s escalated into its own franchise. Other online writers have the same hopes for their fanfictions. But is this kind of writing appropriate and is it right that authors get to literally take other characters and rename them to make it into an entire new series, sometimes not as well-written?

  • Who is a "real writer?" In this day and age, isn't it anyone who writes and publishes something, whether traditionally, through self-publishing, or online? – Stephanie M. 10 months ago
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  • You can tie this into how English majors or people who go to college for this craft are for or against it as well. I am a fellow English Major and I think all writing is good writing, across all mediums. But, I am sure people out there things the opposite of that. Such as people who write Fanfiction don't and have no gone to school for the craft and etc., not sure if that would work but something to think about on the con side of things. – S C 10 months ago
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  • George RR Martin touched on this topic too, on his LiveJournal (he links to Diana Gabaldon's thoughts on the matter as well: http://grrm.livejournal.com/151914.html) There are many sides to this issue -- most professional writers (like GRRM) seem to be less supportive of fanfiction as a concept, whereas others are more sympathetic (like Cassandra Clare). I suppose one's relationship to fanfiction boils down to one's intent: is it better to spend your precious writing hours on someone's pre-established work, or breaking something original? – bloom 10 months ago
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  • I would say that fan fiction is just as much real writing as anything. Why? Because there are several ways for one to write, to be inspired, and to create a world. Sometimes it takes one's own version of the story to birth and even greater tale, however until we try, nothing is for certain.Articles: https://www.bustle.com/articles/71438-13-things-fan-fiction-writers-are-very-tired-of-explaininghttps://psmag.com/fan-fiction-the-next-great-literature-15c99a34d49c#.bq4yb2jb9 – Autumn Edwards 9 months ago
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  • I definitely agree with Autumn Edwards on this topic. I would say fan fic is for real writers because in its most basic form, it is a story. Who says that one can't take some aspects from a different story and create something new, or even add on to a story? Writing is writing (as long as it is not infringing on copyright/publishing/plagiarism issues) but fan fic is for real writers and I think that if it IS good enough that it could have some literary merit. – AlbusBloodworthe 9 months ago
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  • I agree with Stephanie's comment: it's about quality, not genre. Regarding bloom's comment, professional writers have a conflict of interest, so their weigh-in begs a grain of salt. I would disagree with S C that all writing is good, but, again, wholeheartedly agree that form/genre does not determine quality. – Tigey 9 months ago
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  • The issue isn't whether fanfiction is 'real' or not; the issue is that it's wrong to profit off of someone else's work. That's worse than bad writing; that's plagiarism, that's theft. – Sarai 9 months ago
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  • As a former fanfic lover, I say that writing is writing. Yes, most fanfics are empty writing fueled by obsessions and fantasies, but fanfiction has the same potential to be good writing. It just depends on who's writing it and with what purpose because think about it, a good story started out as an idea from the writer's imagination... Fanfiction starts out the same way but with already existing background information. A perfect example is the One Direction fanfiction "After" that started out as a wattpad favorite, and is now published and successful. – ValentinaRueda 9 months ago
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  • Funnily enough, I actually wrote a blog post discussing this very topic with Fantasy author M.E.Vaughan. While the blog post provides a more in-depth discussion, the long and short of it is that every writer is different. Some see fan-fiction as a helpful tool, whilst others see it as a distraction or, worse, an insult to an original creators work. Whomever decides to write this must keep on mind that, really, there is no such thing as a "Real Writer." There is only the expectation of what I writer should be doing which, when you look at it, is a very subjective and heavily debated topic. Here's a link to the post, if you're interested in the more in-depth view: https://whywordswork.wordpress.com/2016/08/02/fan-fiction-creative-practice-or-creative-procrastination-featuring-m-e-vaughan/ – ERHollands 7 months ago
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  • I think fan fiction has its purpose. A lot of a lot of literary assignments spanning elementary to college is fan fiction. In one of my last college projects I changed the ending of AI. Got a B. Also isn't a lot of science fiction tie-ins work inspired by its source material? – lisa82 6 months ago
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