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Boku no Hero Academia: The evolution of Superheroes

Boku no Hero Academia (BnHK) is an anime series that has been rising in popularity over the years in Japan as well as with the Western audience. Among the recent slew of movies and entertainment based around superheroes, Boku no Hero Academia is no different. This follows a current trend in the evolution and redesigning of superheroes’ past and present. There are various similarities and identifiable inspirations that the author of BnHK has taken to flesh his characters, and yet there is a unique charm to one of the series’ protagonists: All Might that carries forward to other characters in the series and makes it truly unique. All Might is very much the Superman of the series, and yet there is something about his character that makes him far more evolved and endearing than the big boy scout. How does this correlate to the current perspective and revision of the modern superhero?

    5

    Is Print Media Beyond Saving?

    As the number of digital news sources rise, the number of print media consumers falls. Many believe that the death of print is inevitable since the generations that are accustom to print will eventually die out. Do you think younger generations will keep print alive? Is it really worth saving?

    • I think it will stay around as a novelty, especially since we can't keep the aesthetic of a bookshelf to display all our favorite works with an e-book for each lol I hope it stays around in some form but it's hard to say. – Slaidey 1 year ago
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    • That's a tough question to answer. I do think there is something irreplaceable about being able to physically hold something (such as a print book) that online sources just can't give you. At the same time, online sources are more accessible, reach a larger audience, are cheaper than print, and can be taken anywhere as long as you have digital access. I don't think print media will go away completely, but as it becomes more "outdated" I think it will become more of a collector's item like vinyl records - not used as often, but something people like to hold on to as a work of art. – fhlloyd 1 year ago
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    • A printer technician is working for his or her expertise in maintaining the proper operation of pressure equipment in a commercial facility. These people are part of a company's maintenance department and usually report all manager's instructions and follow them. These printer technicians often have to undergo professional training to familiarize themselves with the company's operations. – chrissamson 11 months ago
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    • The term or expression "print media" seems quite broad addressing daily newspapers as well as books and therefore book stores. Too broad a term makes it difficult to focus on specifics, which I think is needed to address this issue in a thoughtful way. – Joseph Cernik 11 months ago
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    • Terrifying question to anyone who loves literature/reading, but a good one. I think it'll stay around yes, but with time it'll most likely make a shift to a "vintage" sort of aesthetic rather than what it is today. I think it'll be a large aspect of any reader's life regardless because well having the physical book is different than an e-book, but when it comes to industry, it'll definitely change. There is a Forbes article titled "The Barnes and Nobles Buyout: A Godsend For Book Readers And Investors" where it talks about B&N barely being saved from bankruptcy. It's definitely a frightening time for the publishing industry indeed. – Scharina 10 months ago
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    • Publishers Weekly records that print sales remain strong. Have you watched CNN recently? Do those commentators and interviewees sitting in front of their bookshelves at home really read those books, or are they a stage set like the one "Owl Eyes" discovers in Jay Gatsby's "library" in The Great Gatsby? As Mr. Cernik points out here, "print media" is a large category that takes in many forms. The history of the book suggests that the book will remain around for quite some time. – rockandrollbob 5 months ago
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    6

    Unnecessary Articles In Journalism

    Have you ever read a headline while reading the news, whether it’s considered a serious platform or not, where you truly question why someone would write a whole article dedicated to something so trivial? How is it possible today to see two articles side by side about two drastically different subjects like "Baby Found Amongst Rubble in Syria" right next to "Will Selena Gomez Ever Wear a Bra Again"? I understand that the world can’t always focus on the negative aspects of life all the time but shouldn’t we start to question how nitpicking an famous individual is a better news alternative?

    • I feel that "unnecessary" might be a bit subjective. I could be wrong, but it feels more like you want to critique the online news cycle and clickbait, as compared to print journalism standards. Some questions that could be asked: Who writes clickbait? Why is there a prevalence of clickbait articles on the internet? How has internet journalism changed which topics are highlighted by news websites? How has ad revenue impacted headline choices? And how do algorithms give very different headlines equal standing on any given website? – Eden 1 year ago
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    • I think it could be useful to explore where we draw the line between "Buzzfeed journalism" and "New York Times journalism" (for example). Are either one of these less legitimate than the other? In a world where SEM and SEO increasingly rule, and newsrooms are shrinking, which urge wins-- the urge to write material of quality and truth and intellect, or the urge to actually get people to read it and make a little money off of it? Is there a way to combine both? – haileyscomet 10 months ago
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    • Celebrity gossip is unnecessary. Who cares if the dress is black or white (or whatever it was) or who has broken up with whom? On the other hand, it would be nice to see more articles about a hobby or genre of music or something. Interesting, but not stupid. – OkaNaimo0819 9 months ago
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    5

    The Male Muse

    A muse has traditionally, and generally, been seen as female. She may come from any walk of life and need not be a ‘beauty’ in the classical sense, for it that elusive, almost undefined quality that inspires the creative male mind – but what of the male muse inspiring female creativity? For the Mexican painter, Frida Khalo (1907-1954), her husband was her muse, despite their often turbulent relationship. More recently the American photographer, Sally Mann has spent over forty years photographing her husband going about his daily life. The Dutch artist, Rineka Dijkstra finds inspiration in photographing her son as he grows into a young man, whilst the British filmmaker, Sam Taylor-Johnson describes her husband, Aaron as both her muse and soulmate.

    Familial, romantic and/or sexual relationships aside – do creative women regard their male muses any differently from how creative males regard female muses? By extension – what does a creative woman look for in her male muse? By citing examples from history (both ancient and modern) examine how creative women have found and been inspired by their male muses.

    • Wonderful topic! And I'm very curious about which examples might be pulled to support this topic. I would like to remind you however that this is a little heteronormative--what about women with a female muse, and men with a male muse? Not even in a romantic sense, but maybe as a comparison for the male/female dynamic. I'm thinking of Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West for example. No need to expand beyond heterosexual muse relationships but just a thought! – Eden 11 months ago
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    • Someone may run with this topic in any way he or she wishes :) – Amyus 11 months ago
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    • What a wonderful topic. The art world is full of passionate women who get their inspiration in so many different ways. A male muse is not new, just described less often than female muses. I am very excited to see which examples are shared on this topic and I am looking forward to it! – Guinevere 3 months ago
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    4

    Is disabling comments on internet articles and videos brave or idiotic?

    When online publications release a video or an article that covers a controversial topic or expresses a provocative opinion, more and more frequently the moderators of the website decide to preemptively disable the comments section. Is this a smart idea, given that some topics on more popular websites will inevitably draw internet trolls or similar undesirables to flood comment sections with useless vitriol that overpowers legitimate discussion? Or is this an idiotic action that stifles any chance of legitimate discussion for fear of having to deal with hateful or useless material? Are moderators afraid of being accused of fostering a hateful environment if they allow this material to be presented in their forums? This is especially relevant given that many websites feature a voting system for their comment sections which allow audiences to give relevant comments more visibility based on the opinions of the people actually reading the article or watching the video, thereby allowing audiences to self-regulate what material they choose to engage with.

    • I would suggest being wary of using qualitative terms like "brave" or "idiotic" without strong supporting data (statistics, news headlines, polls, website usage data, etc.). What defines "brave" or "idiotic" is subjective. This feels like it could include a bigger discussion about freedom of speech, censorship, cyber bullying, and hate speech. I would be very interested if this focused on one platform like a case study (YouTube, Twitter, Twitch, 4chan, etc.) because it might be a lot of work to do a broader examination of online commenting. – Eden 1 year ago
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    • If the comments are very/all negative, then you absolutely must disable them. Of course, if the content is disturbing or shouldn't be seen and it causes public outrage, then disabling them seems redundant. However, for something innocent or religious, disabling comments would definitely be necessary. – OkaNaimo0819 9 months ago
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    • Interesting topic! You could possibly explore reasons why disabling comments would be appropriate or argue that it is never appropriate depending on your stance. – Dena Elerian 8 months ago
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    7

    The Heroine's Journey

    Maureen Murdock created the Heroine’s Journey as an alternative to Joseph Campbell’s famous the Hero’s Journey. She believed that the Heroine’s Journey would align better with the female experience.

    Analyze the possible applications of the Heroine’s Journey in writing. Compare the Hero’s Journey and the Heroine’s Journey. What do the differences between them imply about society and our perceptions of masculinity and femininity? Are there any examples of the Heroine’s Journey prevalent in literature and pop culture?

    • I am not as familiar with Murdock's work as I am with Campbell's work and Vogler's interpretation of the Hero's Journey in his book "The Writer's Journey." That being said, Vogler suggests that the real difference between male and female journeys may be in their form: that men's journey is more linear, "proceeding from one outward goal to the next," while women's journey may spin outward, inward and outward again. I think this form suggests that a woman' journey is more introspective than a man's, who--according to Vogler--must achieve his needs of going out and conquering, possessing and achieving. – Paula Rai 1 year ago
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    • I'd love to see an article about this topic! – Sean Gadus 1 year ago
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    • Great topic! Cheryl Strayed's novel-made-film Wild (2012, 2014) would be a great text to examine through the Heroine's Journey. There's a clear quest structure (leaving home, enduring trials, etc.) along with a lot of movement between the outward and inward and a lot of treatment of the mother/daughter relationship.How we look at something affects what we see end up seeing. It'd be interesting to examine how we get different things from a single text if we look at it through Campbell's model or through Murdock's model. – JamesBKelley 1 year ago
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    4

    How fan-fiction has evolved through the years.

    Analyzing how fan-fiction has evolved as something sort of niche and obscure on the internet, written by a usually younger audience to explore the different ideas they wanted to see from shows and movies they loved. Now it has become a wildly viral thing where some people explore those same ideas but with real people including YouTubers, band members and Hollywood celebrities. An interesting approach might be how the ones based on true people might affect those celebrities or internet personalities.

    • cool idea, but it seems somewhat broad? something that could narrow this down could be picking a specific theme/celeb (like you say in the prompt) and examining that, while also synthesizing it to related themes/contexts if you so wish. any stats/additional credible information you could find on this topic supporting its increased prevalence would be useful! – r 6 months ago
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    4

    How Blogging Can be a Great Escape

    Analysis of how using a blogging platform can free the mind and creativity, as well as potentially even releasing writer’s block. Open to any other thoughts on where to take this.

    • I like this, but I would suggest a little clarification. What does it mean to "free the mind" and what is the advantage for writers? Can you find any concrete examples (i.e. quotes, statistics, examples of authors) that either support or do not support blogging as beneficial for writer's block? I think this could be a useful article for young writers. – Eden 1 year ago
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    • I agree with Eden that this needs to be more fully outlined, especially as there are many blogs used for a range of purpose, are you advocating the process of blogging about writing or just doing a blog in general? This is an interesting suggestion but obviously difficult to measure. – SaraiMW 1 year ago
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    • Since I won't be the one writing it, I decided to leave it up to whoever decides to, and let them have free reign on it. Sorry if it sounds kind of floppy, but I wasn't sure how to go about it. – sophiebernard 1 year ago
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    • I began blogging to release all the anxious thoughts that were piling up in my head. I found it much more cathartic than simply writing it in a notebook because submitting something to the internet makes it feel as though that thing has been taken out of your hands and released to strangers forever. – veritygrace 1 year ago
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    • A good idea-probably requires some theme, where the writing develops around some central issue or theme so readers see how it expands. – Joseph Cernik 12 months ago
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    • For whoever takes this, I might also suggest thinking about the social aspect of blogging. How might this help--or complicate things if someone lacks confidence or is shy when engaging with others online? – Emily Deibler 12 months ago
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    • I would recommend as a blogger myself discussing how blogging creates a community and an ability to network as well, which can catalyse this 'escape' – waveofsalt 12 months ago
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    • Do you mean blogging as in writing about day to day life for the world to read? Or do you mean blogging as in writing about one's passion? If you elaborate more on your view, it would help bring this piece together. – Dena Elerian 8 months ago
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