JamesBKelley

JamesBKelley

I was taught to teach writing in the traditional way, with standard essays on standard topics. I'm interested in learning how to use this sort of forum with my own students.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    What do video games allow and not allow?

    The character creation and storytelling features of video games are often interesting and compelling, but each game — by the very nature of its design and coding — doesn’t allow a player always to do exactly what she wants in the game. What is a player to do?

    • I think that there is something deeply philosophical in this topic. Concepts like the rhetorical situation and determinism can also be of use here. – Matt Sautman 1 year ago
      3
    • They can submit new ideas to the developer, but things that people think they want is not always the best idea. – dff5088 1 year ago
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    Latest Comments

    JamesBKelley

    Thanks for your comment. I obviously need to take a closer look at that film!

    Thor's Worthiness to Wield the Hammer
    JamesBKelley

    Myth is inherently inconsistent, I think. Even in ancient Greece there were multiple, contradictory versions of individual myths. See, for example, this statement from Bernard Evslin’s Greek Mythology: “The cycle of tales that make up the Argosy are among the earliest in Greek mythology. As has been seen, there is no ‘authorized text’ of any myth, and particularly none of this cycle, which varies wildly in all its versions.”

    Thor's Worthiness to Wield the Hammer
    JamesBKelley

    Great comment. I think you’re absolutely right about the History Channel’s “Vikings” as well as just about anything on the History Channel.

    For me, inauthenticity isn’t a huge problem in itself, as there’s a lot we’ll never know about previous historical periods and there’s always going to be at least a little of ourselves and of own imaginings in the stories and histories that we tell. For me, the real problem is lack of reflection and abstract thinking. We often take stories much too literally, turning them into historical reality and literal truth. I agree with you that we can enjoy stories of just about any kind even while we remain a little critical of them. Like you say, they should be “enjoyed with a healthy serving of salt with a side of suspension of disbelief.”

    Thor's Worthiness to Wield the Hammer
    JamesBKelley

    Thanks, Beaa, for the comment.

    My understanding is that mythology is constantly being adapted and revised. Even the ancient Greeks were engaged in adaptation and revision, taking ideas from earlier Near Eastern mythologies and reworking them as their own, producing variants of their own myths, and so on. For me, developing a critical view of mythology doesn’t have to mean not having love for mythology. I know that I would much rather read and write about things that really interest me than about things that I simply don’t like.

    Thor's Worthiness to Wield the Hammer
    JamesBKelley

    Thanks, Alphonso, for the great insight. I’ll need to think more about the most recent Thor film.

    Thor's Worthiness to Wield the Hammer
    JamesBKelley

    I enjoyed reading your essay. I don’t know the series at all and could follow along easily. I’m left wondering though if the human protagonist keeps the parasite a secret (does he hide Migi from other humans?), or does everyone know about parasites in the series? If they keep their symbiosis a secret, that secret might work well as a theme for exploring the question of whether or not humans hide a (secret) inhumane nature.

    Your essay covers the topic well, moving from criticism of humanity to a defense of sort of humanity. The transition from your first main point to your second main point comes here: “Though a large portion of Parasyte seems to be a condemnatory criticism of humanity, it also explores quite the contrary.” For me, the section headings used in your essay didn’t help me see that organization at first. I was looking for a heading to announce each new main point.

    Some spelling errors interrupted the reading for me or caused a little confusion at first. “Humanities” is a word, but in all three times that you use it I think you mean to use the possessive form of “humanity”: “humanity’s.”

    Parasyte: Exploration of what it means to be human
    JamesBKelley

    That sounds absolutely right to me. Even documentaries are more than uninterrupted filming of some animal or event. Documentaries are also edited for dramatic effect. We don’t want reality on our TVs.

    Getting to the Airport and Other Actions That TV Completely Misrepresents
    JamesBKelley

    These days wouldn’t hacking mostly look like this:

    Okay, I’ve sent the email. Someone on the inside just has to click on the link. So now… we wait.

    Getting to the Airport and Other Actions That TV Completely Misrepresents