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The impact of a female Doctor Who

The announcement that we would have the first female dr who really divided a lot of people. Personally, I think it is a fantastic idea, but I would love to see an article that looks at both sides of the argument. It would also be good for the author to look at other women in science fiction television roles, and what they brought to the role in comparison.

  • I'm not entirely sure that there is a valid, non misogynistic, reason not to have a female Dr. Who. An article focusing on the evolution of the Dr into this new incarnation and its impact could be fascinating without being inflammatory. Combining that with or creating a separate article focusing on women in leading/supporting roles within science fiction could be interesting as well. – L Squared 4 months ago
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  • Im of the opinion that creating genuine original kickass females are better than just substituting original male characters....Ellen Ripley is my favourite character in sci-fi... Maybe some more great characters ??? – RedFlame2000 3 months ago
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Taken by Nad (PM) 1 month ago.
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Rick and Morty and the success of spontaneous comedy

Perhaps one of the most talked about and bingeable Netflix shows is Justin Roiland and Dan Harmons: "Rick and Morty". Drawing influence from ‘Back to the future’, combining it with philosophical pessimism and a convoluted plot line featuring parallel universe- the shows success is rooted from its spontaneous humour and erratic social commentary . This formula behind this creative process has been emulated by numerous shows to great success which would make an article about this trend exploring why such success is present, quite compelling.

  • Yes, I really like this notion, Bojack Horseman is another netfilx comedy within this genre – Iliasbakalla 2 months ago
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"Anne With An E" - Elucidating emotional realism and compassion

Some parents feel that Netflix’s Original series "Anne With An E," a remake of Montgomery’s beloved "Anne of Green Gables," goes too far in introducing topics such as child abuse, neglect, bullying, and sex to a family audience. Others feel it is an amazing and beautiful handling of these topics, teaching compassion and consideration even in a dark world. How does discussing difficult emotion promote or prevent healing and understanding?

  • J'adore your topic! :) – Stephanie M. 4 months ago
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  • Thanks! :) – CLHale 4 months ago
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The message that George RR Martin is trying to send with Game of Thrones

Analyze and discuss what greater meaning there is in Game of Thrones, an overarching message that Martin is trying to send to his readers (and viewers I guess) beyond the amazing fantasy, political intrigue, and gut-wrenching battles and deaths that has enraptured most of the fan base.

  • An interesting idea for a topic, especially since Hillary Clinton appears to identify with the Cersei Lannister/Baratheon character. Real life copying art? – Amyus 2 months ago
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  • Something can be said for the unabashed yet tactical killing off of characters in the series, and what relevance this has in contemporary television's trends in dependency on viewer/fan preferences/reactions. – LNwenwu 2 months ago
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  • I think it would also be helpful to analyze, or critique, i would say, his methods for promoting messages. The amount of gross sexual content in the series, for instance...is this fanservice? Necessary to the plot? What are his ways of getting his views across to others? – EricJohnson 2 months ago
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  • Is there truly an overall message that Martin is trying to send though? I personally don't believe it's that complicated. Just Westeros vs the dead with Martin just trying to make a buck off his creative and intelligent fantasy writing style. – EsportsJosh 2 months ago
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  • While I'm not sure there's a coherent "message" to be found within Game of Thrones, I do think it's been noted before how much GOT/ASOIAF deconstruct certain tropes of fantasy. The traditional good v. evil battle is muddied constantly throughout the series, and there's a quote by George RR Martin saying "the true horrors of human history derive not from orcs and Dark Lords, but from ourselves," which brings up GOT's emphasis on its characters largely being responsible for their actions, and the consequences that arise from them. – LucasLacamara 1 month ago
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Red Dwarf - Growing old disgracefully in Space.

The British science fiction comedy TV series ‘Red Dwarf’ (1988-1999)(2009-Present) has gained a cult status and follows the misadventures of what are essentially four less than intrepid blokes stuck in Space. With the main characters frequently exhibiting flaws such as cowardice, laziness and downright incompetence, the stories provide a welcome, humorous antidote to the morally upright characters typically found in many science fiction series. The latest series is due to appear in October 2017 and the fact that the lead actors are no longer the spring chickens they once were has not gone unnoticed by the show’s main writer, Doug Naylor, who has already started to include jokes at the expense of his ageing characters. Could this perhaps lead to the birth of a new comedy genre that would playfully examine the inevitable encroachment of advancing years and a second childhood in a Sci-Fi setting?

  • This is an interesting point. One of the newest trends emerging out of the UK has been the changing focus of target audience age groups. One of the best examples of this has been 'Dr Who' with the return to an older doctor with both Peter Capaldi and Jodie Whittaker. In many ways this is a logical choice as the aging baby boomers are still the largest generation and are now progressing into a period of having greater disposable incomes and time, it makes sense then that there is a return to nostalgic childhood, but explored through the aging "grey" actors. – SaraiMW 2 months ago
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The Women of The Bold Type

The first season of The Bold Type just concluded and it has received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and viewers alike. For a show predicated on the lives of three young women – Jane, Sutton, and Kat – working at a women’s magazine, the writers could have easily made its characters vapid and its plot shallow or overly predictable, or pit the three females together in competition with each other. Instead, these women each occupy their own department within the magazine and only ever try to support each other as they navigate their love lives, sexuality, jobs, and identities.
Analyze the diversity of The Bold Type’s major female characters (Jane, Sutton, Kat, but even Jacqueline and Adena are useful for this discussion): their strengths, faults, and growth throughout the season. How does the characterization of these women, and the obstacles they must overcome, contribute to the show’s overarching theme of female empowerment?

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    CW's "The 100" and Moral Relativity

    "The 100" has become known for its morally gray characters. In the TV show, warring clans often use the justification "[insert devastating action] was done for my people." However, "The 100’s" stance is not so clear cut. Discuss the TV show’s portrayal of moral relativism. Does "The 100" agree with the justifications characters provide for their actions (i.e. committing genocide "for [their] people")? Or does it want viewers to challenge the ideologies behind the "heroes" behavior? What evidence contributes to your conclusion, whether it be cinematography, symbolism, plot parallels, etc?

    • Almost all characters have their "gray" moments, but Marcus Kane's season 1 arc was very important in defining the show for me. – IndiLeigh 3 months ago
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    • An interesting topic, and worth discussing within also the framework of the moral dilemma at the heart of the narrative - the concept of the sacrifice of few to save more. Moral relativism is a complex area to examine, but this show indeed touches on a number of areas because it is removed from the pre-existing framework of a recognisable socio-cultural setting. – SaraiMW 2 months ago
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    The Evolution of Tim Allen as a Dad

    In the 1990s, Tim Allen starred in Home Improvement as Tim Taylor, wherein he raised his three sons Mark, Brad, and Randy with wife Jill. Around 2010, Tim returned to the dad role, this time as Mike Baxter on Last Man Standing. As Mike, he raises and supports three daughters, Kristin, Mandy, and Eve, with wife Vanessa.

    The two shows are both great and bring to mind several questions. For instance, how is Tim Taylor, who raises sons, different in personality and approach from Mike Baxter, who raises daughters? Are they alike at all? Do the ages of the children make a difference–Baxter’s daughters are pretty much grown up, and one is a mother (Eve, the youngest, is in high school. Taylor’s sons were middle and elementary schoolers when Home Improvement began and age more slowly). Which character, if either, is the more realistic TV dad, or the better one? The better/more realistic husband? What does each show have to say about raising single-gender families?

    • I am so psyched to read this future post. – Emily Esten 3 months ago
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    • Thanks, Emily. I considered writing it myself, but I haven't watched enough Home Improvement to make any definitive calls. I am, however, a Last Man Standing fan. – Stephanie M. 3 months ago
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