Ryan

Stonybrook Undergrad

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    Latest Topics

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    Primate Representation in Media

    This topic is concerned with the representation of non-human primates, especially great apes, in television, cinema, music, and more. This topic isn’t necessarily concerned with the quantity of primate representation as much as it is the quality; how they are represented in relation to humans, in relation to their endangerment, habitat loss, mistreatment, evolution, intelligence…etc. Some examples of primate media representation one might consider are: The chimp in Jordan Peele’s "Nope," The Planet of the Apes franchise, meme culture…etc.
    Writers in this topic would be exploring how the current attitudes towards our closest taxonomic relatives is embedded either blatantly or within the subtext of modern media, or how these attitudes have changed overtime. In the Planet of the Apes example, one might write about humanity’s ability to share our planet, or even consider sharing our planet, and what qualities of life are required in a species for us to even begin to consider sharing resources. Just about any example will require writers to discuss the prevalence, or the rare absences, of speciesism in our culture.

    • More details for the person who will write this topic would be much appreciated ;) – Beatrix Kondo 5 months ago
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    • Could you clarify what you're looking for the writer to explore? – Sunni Ago 5 months ago
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    • Regarding the Planet of the Apes franchise, one could consider the representation from the 1968 film in comparison to the more modern films as a bit of a possible starting point. – SiothrĂșn 5 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    I’m particularly taken with how Jane’s mural depicts her as intertwined with the universe in a way not too dissimilar to how you describe her relationship with ABQ. She affects the universe around her as it also affects her. I wonder what we might be able to say about the murals reflection of Walt’s epiphany about chance and odds in the fly episode.

    Breaking Bad's Jane: An Island in Albuquerque

    I think this is a very well written article but the topic leaves me wanting more. I’d be more interested to know why you think Shakespeare wrote LM to be “complex.” Do you find that by having LM denounce her femininity Shakespeare is demonstrating, or subconsciously adhering to, a gender barrier for writing complex characters? Also, while I do agree that LM is one of Shakespeare’s more developed female characters, I don’t know if I’d go as far as to say she is complex. I think for her character to be considered complex, we’d need more explanation of her motivations. Her lust for power lacks complexity. Why does she want power so bad she’s willing to kill for it? The only explanation I can come up with is a feeling of powerless she might feel from everyday womanhood, or more specifically from her lost child. Yet, neither of these reasons get much written attention. This child is mentioned only once during the “unsex me ” speech and given no further context. LM also lacks interaction with other characters, only conversing with Macbeth. I’ll agree that her manipulating of her husband adds complexity to her character, but take these marital interactions out and she’s a rather isolated character. For that reason she has always seemed to me to be more of a vessel for commentary on gender rather than a complex character. Then again I’d just as quickly argue many Shakespearean characters lack complexity.

    Lady Macbeth: Unravelling the Complexities of Shakespeare's Iconic Character

    I’ve often heard interpretations of this film, focused on the symbolism or presence of oil specifically, that propose Daniel to be a victim. In these interpretations, the oil itself is the antagonist of the film — similar to its role in “Oil!”, the Upton Sinclair novel that the film is based off of. When I considered these interpretations alongside your points about isolation, I got to thinking about how Daniel is never really alone in the film’s onset as you suggest. The opening score paired with the mountain landscape shots convey the evil presence of oil under the ground, waiting to be dug up.

    Alienation in "There will be Blood"