Kaya

Kaya

Drama student in Queen Mary University of London.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Existential and Philosophical Questions in 'West World'

    The new HBO series ‘West World’ is a striking example of a deeply philosophical reflection of the world we live in. It poses questions regarding the existence of God, who or what is he? Are people able to ‘play’ God? Is there another world, one which is invisible for us? Or maybe countless dimensions? Are our everyday lives just a meaningless form of existence or is there a deeper meaning to everything? The series suggests that everything happens for a reason and people can, after all, control their own destiny.

    • Such an interesting topic! The TV series Westworld has gone much further than simply being a remake of the 1973 movie. In the series, we follow human characters but, most of all, we follow the robots and we sympathize with them. We mainly see their perspectives and, sometimes, we even identify with them. The consequences of such a directorial choice are complex. Robots are not presented as others anymore. They have feelings, memories, and back-stories. They are continuously updated in order to satisfy the clients better, in a way that reminds us of the way in which we continuously need to adapt ourselves to the ever-changing external world. Even though these robots are depicted in such a ‘human’ way to us, we also see them treated as objects, as goods by the clients and by their creators. Still, even within their oppressed and objectified position, these robots manage to control their own storylines. In this way, the old motif of the struggle between creator and creature –which recalls Shelley’s Frankenstein– is explore in a new, existential way. Can individuals escape determinism? Can we rewrite a story that has already been written? If not, is there a meaning in our lives? – CostanzaCasati 10 months ago
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    Modern Cinema: Are Movies Becoming Just a Bunch of Special Effects?

    We all admire the new techniques and special effects in movies we see in the cinema, but is there actually any value in them? You walk out of the cinema with your eyes full and your head empty. Are movies adopting a purpose just for entertaining? Films from the past, like Luc Besson’s Leon, or Blade Runner, or even Forrest Gump carry lots of food for thought, a vast emotional landscape and deserve to be called true works of art. Can we say the same about movies nowadays?

    • I totally get where you're coming from, but treating this as a symptom of "modern cinema" seems like a bit of a generalization. True, the issue has become grossly more inflate with each passing year since the 1980s, but that's only really one side of the industry, the flashy Blockbuster market designed for mass consumption. Let's just look at one year for a moment, 2014: sure, the box office was dominated by Transformers 4, The Hobbit 3, and Guardians of the Galaxy 1, but this was also the year of Boyhood, Whiplash, and Selma, as well as (in my opinion, two of the best films in recent memory) Leviathan and The Best Offer. Perhaps the issue isn't that all contemporary films are saturated in special effects, but rather that the films which employ extraneous spectacle with little substance consistently out-gross the more artistic films, which may say more about audiences than filmmakers. In fact, this very subject was handled expertly in Birdman (also from 2014), which made great use of special effects to enhance its artistry while simultaneously satirizing the current state of the popular cinema. – ProtoCanon 11 months ago
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    • Depends on what one means by art, I would tend to agree with you that a lot of movies don't seem to have any substance outside of the over-the-top special effect sequences, action movies in particular. Keep in mind though, that the people working on those special effects more than likely have computer design and art backgrounds. When looking at it from that standpoint, movies like Fast & Furious, The Avengers, X-Men, and so on, are more art-based than The Piano or Forrest Gump. The problem or question at hand, is whether or not studios are choosing more special effects filled mega releases over thought provoking 'works of art'? – MikeySheff 10 months ago
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    • I find that although films such as Independance Day: Resurgance do exist, wherein special effects are all the film has to offer, many a time, VFX aid storytelling in films today, and even blockbusters can remain compelling films despite the use of set pieces full of special effects, examples being Edge of Tommorow, Captain America: The Winter Soldier/Civil War, and Ex Machina, a film which used very expensive visual effects to tell a particularly intelligent and compelling story. – JacobSe7en 10 months ago
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    • This is a great topic. I think that the Hollywood film is the general type that appears in cinema today where there is flashing and violence and different uses of special effects to keep viewers interested. It seems that films these days are focusing too much on this aspect and not on the emotional aspect and I think this really takes something away from the culture of cinema. – alexadoiron 10 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Kaya

    Thank you so much !

    The Brutal Presentation of Modern Society in The Play 'Shopping and F***ing'
    Kaya

    The question about the difference between the original tales and the Disney remakes has always been an interest to me. There was one part in your article where you assert that the message the fairytales convey is that if the princesses behave well, they will be rewarded. That is not the case with every princess’ fairytale though. Ariel for example always breaks the rules and is not “well-behaved”. Also I don’t think that Disney princesses are such a bad influence. I see nothing wrong in educating children (both boys and girls) how to be kind, generous and warm-hearted. The issue about the appearance, however, is one that I agree with. A bigger diveristy amongst the presentations of what a “beautiful” and “good – looking” person looks like is needed.

    Fairytales and Feminism: "I Don't Wanna be Like Cinderella"
    Kaya

    That was a very inspiring piece of writing there, thank you! Apart from strongly believing in magic, my other little trick for getting inspired is talking to my loved ones. Writing creates another world, one where you can open up yourself truly and its fascinating what that world can offer you! Stay inspired! 🙂

    Creating a Writing Habit that Works: Muses, Magic and Faith
    Kaya

    I love the complexity of the work!

    Lively Objects: Curating 'Broken' Electronic Art
    Kaya

    That was very nicely put.

    Manga: How to Travel Between Dimensions
    Kaya

    Wonderful article!

    Using Zen Philosophy to Improve Creativity and Overcome Writer’s Block