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Animal studies and cartoons?

I am interested in this topic. Maybe here there are already many articles and people focusing on that? Maybe several people that know good books, articles related to anthropomorphization?

  • Do you have a specific idea or question about animal studies and cartoons? Maybe, why cartoons tend to anthropomorphize animals, or what the history of cartoons with animal characters is like? These are just examples. Once you have a specific idea or question in mind, try searching this site using the magnifying glass icon at the top of the page to see if other articles or topics have been written about this idea. Good luck! – Eden 1 year ago
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  • Thanks for the hint. I am interested in all kinds of questions related to this topic but specifically, I have an interest in how anthropomorphization affects the perception of animals and how animal stereotypes are showed and created in cartoons. I am pretty sure I will find some information for those questions, here. – JustinaVonDanzig 1 year ago
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  • I would be more specific with your topic. Because right now I feel it's a little too broad. – BMartin43 1 year ago
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  • I'm not sure I see the issue: animals and cartoons. Is this about Bugs Bunny or the Lion King? This needs a major rewriting. – Joseph Cernik 1 year ago
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  • As other people have mentioned, I would make this question more specific to one or two cartoons or works, like ThunderCats, the Animorphs book series, etc., and discuss one main issue with anthromorphization. For example, "Manimals: The History of Anthropomorphization" or "Bunnies and Cats and Dogs, Oh My! The History of Talking Animals in Saturday Morning TV." – Devon 1 year ago
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Living Vicariously Through Cartman: Cartoons, Free Speech and Taboo

Cartoons like South Park and The Boondocks are known for their provocative humour. However, its hard to imagine the same jokes and subject matter in a live-action format being tolerated in mainstream culture. Consider whether the worlds of cartoons, due to their overt incongruence with real life on the superficial level, make this kind of humour more palatable. Also, discuss the significance of cartoons for public conversation and free speech. Do cartoons and the universes they create allow us to indulge in taboo conversations in a way that is more difficult with more realistic material?

  • Definitely. I mean having these topics brought up in an 'unreal' world surely makes these things easier to say, and therefore, easier for viewers to stomach? Same kind of logic that applies to depersonalisation through online communication I suppose. – TomWadsworth 3 years ago
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