Ryan Walsh

Ryan Walsh

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

    3

    Superman: Symbol of Hope Overshadowed by Nationality Identification

    Analyzing the history of Superman’s concept as a hero who fights for truth, justice, and freedom, to how freedom was replaced by the "American Way" leading to fans and casual readers to argue about Superman’s national identity. Overlooking how national identity does not solely define Superman’s legacy as an inspiration for hope, and question if his label as an "American icon" is more harmful to the character than anticipated.

    • They did do a Red Son superman where he was no longer fighting for the American way but for the Russian way. I am not sure if that would be helpful seeing as he is still fighting for a national identity. Perhaps there is room here to analyze audience responses and see how some creators conflate national identity with freedom. – DClarke 2 years ago
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    Kinnikuman: The Struggles of Cultural Sensitivty

    Kinnikuman is the name most people would be familiar with from the dubbed version of its second anime entitled "Ultimate Muscle", not knowing that it is a sequel to Kinnikuman. One would wonder why it has not been released in North America as it moves like a typical shonen story. However, during the times of Japan’s naivety compared to today regarding anime, Kinnikuman presents some questionable imagery that would be baffling and unintentionally insulting to other countries. Should Kinnikuman be allowed to have a proper North American release? Or should Kinnikuman be lost from the public eye except to the internet culture and online fandoms?

    • I'd look into G Gundum for more examples of anime racism that is mostly harmless – MattHotaling 1 year ago
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    Progression in Television Animation: Prejudice towards Comedic Cartoons

    With the rise of progressive animated shows for children and adults these days such as Gravity Falls and Steven Universe, a lot of praise has been spreading around for how entertaining the shows are for balancing heart, development, and comedy. However, there seems to be a vocal backlash towards shows that doesn’t live up to the expectations of the people who enjoy progressive shows. If an animated show is comedic without much depth or drama, it is garned as idiotic and for some reason, deserves to be hated by many even though those shows never really harmed anyone. This article would discuss the progression of animated shows through time and make comparisons between shows that are different in their presentations. And determine if they truly are meant to be hated, or are just getting attention from people who are not their intended target audience.

    • Do you have any examples regarding purely comedic shows that get a vocal backlash. Because I would argue that there are some specific shows out there right now that are purely comedic, and they don't serve much in terms of either good humor, or good taste. And thus somewhat deserve a certain amount of negative press for not putting enough concerted effort into making at least a generally entertaining show. For instance, "We Bare Bears" is by and large a purely entertaining comedic series. It doesn't aim to be anything more, and it does not try to have more than a basic moral message in each of its episodes, if they have one at all. But a purely comedic show like "Pickle and Peanut," is just pure garbage by comparison, and offers nothing of wit or substance to its potential audience. – Jonathan Leiter 1 year ago
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    • Basically what I mean is that "We Bare Bears" is an excellent series that fosters good gags and humor. Whereas "Pickle and Peanut" does not. Now what does this say about comedic and even gross-out cartoons of the past? Well those shows still have their moments and their audience. But it was also a different time, and they were perfectly fine in their own era. Today, though, I don't think you can quite present the same kind of gross-out content without upsetting far more people than back in the 90s. And I personally can't stand most of it because honestly, its really unappealing. – Jonathan Leiter 1 year ago
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    • I noticed that the tag for this is Teen Titans Go, and while I can see why some would call is idiotic, there might be more to it than that. The reason I can see for Teen Titans Go getting so much backlash is not because it is being comedic; rather, it is because it had a serious predecessor that ran incomplete. There are many DC fans that feel like Cartoon Network is mistreating their DC shows. Teen Titans, canceled; Young Justice, Canceled; Green Lantern Core, canceled; it might be that Teen Titans has been running so long while these other shows got canceled while they were arguably of a higher quality. People that want to see serious ideas in animation will probably steer clear of We Bare Bears and Uncle Grandpa because those are label as comedies, while Teen Titans Go came from a line of serious animations. – garland41 1 year ago
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    Power Rangers and Super Sentai - Cultural Differences Between Two Versions of the Same Heroes

    Introduced to North America in the 1990s, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was a different type of superhero show that became a major part of pop culture. Later on it was revealed that the series actually used footage and characters from the 16th Super Sentai series in Japan, Zyuranger. Both series has similarities but contain many differences due to cultural differences from their home countries. Are the changes justified or was the conversion from Sentai to Power Rangers an example of Americanizing foreign shows?

    • I think it'll be really hard to know whether the changes were justified. Justified here makes little sense... What kind of cultural changes are justified? Do we measure it with the amount of originality it has or accreditation it gives to the original show? Anyway, I'm tempted to think that any cultural copy, no matter how natural-looking or coincidental, is a step of, well, copying. So surely it's an example of Americanizing foreign shows, which continues even today I think. – Abhimanyu Shekhar 1 year ago
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    Original vs Remake: Which is the better film?

    This is a topic that has many people split down the middle. Many people will say that if the new film is a remake of a classic, watch the classic. However, for many people, they believe the remake is better than the original. Ranging from the Chocolate Factory films, the Planet of the Apes films, even superhero films such as Batman and Spider-man have people split about which version is better. Are the originals always better, are the remakes superior, or will this just be an endless debate with no real end?

    • This shouldn't just focus on pure American remakes but also on remakes of films from different countries. Two example that come to mind are the [REC] films (Spanish) that were remade into Quarantine and there are also The Ring films to compare to. Both of these examples are horror films and they could easily be looked at too, there are plenty there to look at. How the format of this article would be interesting, whether it goes film by film or by genre (World cinema, horror, superheroes, fairy tales etc.). I think either way would work but I would probably edge to wards doing it by genre. – Jamie White 1 year ago
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    • With remakes, they could overdo trying to replace possible quality in the original with the quantity so often found when introducing elements like CGI. Like there's this attitude that CGI can "breathe life" into an older film that was made before CGI became abundant everywhere, as was the case with the remake of The Thing (also a horror film) in 2011. So CGI could definitely be a problem to address for the original vs. remake debate since overuse of new technology can make or break the remake especially in the name of attempting to make the original relevant again in the public eye. – dsoumilas 1 year ago
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    Sonic the Hedgehog: Video Game Icon, Gaming Community's Punching Bag

    Analyze and discuss why Sonic the hedgehog gets a lot of ire on the internet despite his status as a video game icon. The Blue Blur became a phenomenon in the 90’s but then struggled during the dawn of 3D gaming. Despite having some successful 3D games with praise from critics and fans, a mass others still cry out that all 3D Sonic games are garbage and inferior to Sonic’s 2D games despite there existing good 3D Sonic games. Is the massive disappointment of the modern Sonic justified or are people putting down Sonic as a popular fad to hate something for no explained reason.

    • One of the reasons that the Sonic franchise has received a lot of backlash is how the character is the embodiment of Sega's downfall. Think about it, Nintendo and Sega were constantly butting heads in the 90's, but now-a-days, we see a lot of Sega games on Nintendo devices. Now that we know that Sega lost the battle with Nintendo, Sonic as a character will always be carrying the stench of failure. – Aaron Hatch 1 year ago
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    • I think it's really interesting how Sonic has been incorporated into the Nintendo world with Smash Bros. It shows that Nintendo is so far ahead of Sega now and that they are so confident of their own products that they are willing to put a competitors character in their own game. – Jamie White 1 year ago
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    • A big part of this, I think, is Sega failing to understand the market and what their fans want. Objectively, on paper, the idea of a Sonic game NOT being about speed and fast traversal sounds counter-intuitive for the series, as was the case with Sonic Boom. They have tried to focus on mobile games, but their profits continue to dwindle.Sega cited the global economy as reason for their financial loss, rather than accepting ownership over the quality (or perceived lack thereof) of their games.They seem to lose sight over what people want from the Sonic series. – BradShankar 1 year ago
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    Canadian Animation: The Struggles of Earning Recognition from Audiences

    Discussing the history of how Canadian animation stood out from its more successful neighbours in the United States and Japan. While also analyzing why is Canadian animation overlooked from its creative possibilities and cultural identity, to being remembered only for its Adobe Flash animated shows that is considered cheap entertainment.

    • I think that its also important for whoever writes this to discuss Sheridan - it's renowned for its animation program and many of its students are hired to work in the US. As a result, much of the talent in Canada spread and sourced throughout other more well known animation companies. – DullahanLi 2 years ago
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    • I think this is a very important topic. I also think that it could be parlayed into asking where Canadian comic book talent is as well. I think somebody should tackle this one – DClarke 2 years ago
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    • There are also Canadian animation companies that are well-known, such as 9 Story Media Group (who have Arthur on their slate). It will be good do research on these companies and what they produce. – YsabelGo 2 years ago
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    What Defines as “Just for Kids” in Entertainment?

    Analyze what it is that makes the audience define animated films as just for kids, even when a film contain mature themes, scary moments, or adult humor. Despite appealing to audiences of all ages as the intention, society continues to label animated films as kids stuff since they are not realistic like other films.

    • I definitely agree that the lack of realism is part of what has lead to animation being treated as just kids fodder. However, correct me if I'm wrong, but before the advent of colour cartoons, weren't cartoons moreso considered adult entertainment? They were often played before films of the era and had much more racy overtones?Is it perhaps an effect of the marketablility of colour on children that led to this also? Or am I totally off base? – Talcon 2 years ago
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    • @Talcon: Thanks for that insight, what I wanted to focus on was is the animation that is well known to the public eye. While there were indeed racist cartoons, but I noticed many people either talk about them from an academic stand point, or choose to ignore them because of the racist content. For me, I'm focusing on what is popular and well loved, but is still regarded as kids stuff just because its animated from a modern perspective. – MajoraChaLa 2 years ago
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    • Princess Mononoke and Hunchback of Notre Dame are fair pieces that come to mind. In fact, Disney itself is very guilty of this when we talk about Pinocchio. I agree that many times, we're given animated films described as just for kids yet they have explicit adult themes. However, it's also fair to note that many times, different people disagree on what is terms as for kids. For example, if we switch mediums to Harry Potter, the author maintains her books are for kids, death or no death. So, a good definition and line needs to be drawn at the beginning of any article centered on this topic. – SpectreWriter 2 years ago
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    • Another interesting point which this raises is: How seriously should one take a children's film, does it deserve, or not deserve the same amount of criticism as a serious art film, simply because it aims to please children? There has, inevitably, been a shift towards appealing to adults, as well as children, mostly because it is the adults who are inevitably paying to see the film along with their children. However, there is a common argument that there should be some concessions towards children's films when analysing or evaluating them. Should a children's film remain consistent with itself or be given some sort of leniency because of its target audience? – Matthew Sims 2 years ago
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    • I think it is purely the medium this genre takes. Animation is associated with cartoons (obviously) which we associate as children's television. It is basically judging a book by it's cover, or a semiotic thing; we assign certain traits to colours for example (red: love, blood, death, passion). It's a subconscious thing that I believe we all have/do. It does unfortunately put us off brilliant serious animation like the Cuban film Chico and Rita, which was a lovely romantic story with a wonderful jazz soundtrack. – Jamie 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Ryan Walsh

    I think goofy was just referring to how people treat the franchise as a religion despite that its just entertainment.

    In Defense of the Star Wars Prequels
    Ryan Walsh

    Kinda miraculous how it has lasted for this long isn’t it?

    Dragon Ball: Why is it Still Endearing to People Everywhere?
    Ryan Walsh

    This is interesting to read about as I was just talking about this in my one class. From my own experience, remastering helps to tweak up a game with better controls and graphics without changing a lot of the game’s presentation, as the 2 Zelda remasters on the 3DS are great examples. But some remakes can be questionable indeed. I remember learning that the PS4 remake of DmC included improved visuals, controls, adding in lock on, and also more costumes including the classic Dante. Otherwise for other games, not really sure if its worth a bang for your buck. It could be too for another reason why we’re getting a lot of these is because we’re going on such a nostalgia kick these days. Nintendo is always famous for that as they have many franchises and characters that are iconic to gaming, so I think other companies are trying to do the same with some of their games that are considered popular and/or iconic.

    An Abundance of Remasters: Originality in the Gaming Industry
    Ryan Walsh

    But because of the graphical limitations of its time and even the HD remaster of it still uses sprites, it has an excuse in a way. But when it comes to some 3D games, that can be problematic. Just seeing the one image of Yuna in this article on the 3 different systems is quite jarring as the PS4 one looks blurry.

    An Abundance of Remasters: Originality in the Gaming Industry
    Ryan Walsh

    I remember so many arguments in the Zelda community about which is the “definitive” Zelda title, Ocarina of Time, or Link to the Past before it. Problem being is that it all comes down to personal preference that somehow makes people think their preference is the dominant reason for the one game to be the best. For many, OoT explores more of the Zelda mythos with its story, but some feel it robs the exploration. Whereas LttP before OtT, has the exploration, but little story. No real balance, its just both games have their strengths and weaknesses.

    But to me, yeah, Ocarina REALLY holds up, it helps too with the remake for the 3DS. It was also the game that got me into the Zelda franchise to begin with and I’m thankful for that. But I remember being there when LttP was around and even then I was never interested in the game, even after finally playing it. Guess I was born to never really like LttP.

    Does Ocarina of Time Still Hold Up By Today's Standards?
    Ryan Walsh

    Its interesting how there is a lot of darker imagery and darker themes in the original story, but doesn’t help that the show is always an advertisement for the actual cards. Maybe it would’ve been different if 4kids didn’t dub it, but then we wouldn’t have yugioh abriged would we? lol. But I jest, still interesting article!

    Yu-Gi-Oh!: Terrifying or Inspiring?
    Ryan Walsh

    Well that was one of the many ways how it got exposed to people, but I was talking about how it lasted for so long even to today, being exposed on north american channels is a tiny reason for its success.

    Dragon Ball: Why is it Still Endearing to People Everywhere?
    Ryan Walsh

    Funny thing, Dragon Ball DID air in North America before DBZ, but from what I remember, they only did the first 13 episodes which was the Emperor Pilaf saga. Though even more ironic that it was supposed to be the ONLY story Toriyama started with intentionally before it got really popular. The problem was that it didn’t capture the attention of the western audiences of the 90’s because they wanted more action. Same thing happened with the Mega Man cartoon, originally capturing the spirit and feel of the games, but then gave it a completely rehaul to make it more “MANLY!”. But basically years later, DBZ aired and that’s what happened then. DBZ did make become popular here, but it TECHNICALLY did not air here first. The first 13 episodes of Dragon Ball did.

    Dragon Ball: Why is it Still Endearing to People Everywhere?