Aliya Gulamani

Aliya Gulamani

My articles convey my interests in the arts scene. Literature, in particular, is important to me and I enjoy examining and analysing both fictional and non-fictional works.

Junior Contributor III

  • Lurker
  • Pssst
  • Hand Raiser
  • ?
  • Articles
    1
  • Featured
    1
  • Comments
    46
  • Ext. Comments
    41
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    2
  • Topics Taken
    0
  • Notes
    8
  • Topics Proc.
    0
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    418
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    256

    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

    5
    literature
    Write this topic

    The book after the bestseller

    Analyse the complications and challenges authors face when writing a new book after publishing a bestseller, that has earned them public acclaim. Most writers dream of writing a successful book but can this achievement turn out to be destructive? Also, our expectations as readers – do we, despite ourselves, have expectations that are inevitably unfulfilled? Do we play a hand in promoting commercial literature and hindering creativity by responding to texts and authors in a certain way?

    • This piece could include examples of books that successfully followed their bestselling prequels, as well as those that disappointed, and try to analyze the differences. – Amena Banu 5 years ago
      0
    • The last question, 'Do we play a hand in promoting commercial literature and hindering creativity by responding to texts and authors in a certain way?' has potential to be explored as a standalone article. – Yama144 5 years ago
      0
    • I agree with Yama, the topic is too large for numerous in depth questions. The first question relating to our expectations can be the basis of a solid, interesting and revealing article. – arcade13 5 years ago
      0
    • I can definitely see this applied to book series like Harry Potter and the way Rowling was influenced by fans and the films. – Christina Cady 5 years ago
      0
    • I am willing to take up this topic, but I cannot think of content. No one likes a personal opinions post or a short post. I think we either needs lots of ideas or a case study. – Abhimanyu Shekhar 5 years ago
      0
    • I think Harry Potter's books would be a really good comparison as Christina mentioned above. Also J K Rowling's decision to adopt a pen name afterwards. Another more recent example would be Kazuo Ishiguro - whose new release the Buried Giant - as a fantasy novel has created interesting responses. You could examine the responses to his book and compare or contrast the popular responses to his previous works. – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
      1
    2
    Published

    Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist

    Examining Roxane Gay’s ideas in ‘Bad Feminist’ with particular emphasis on her use of the term ‘bad feminist.’ How does this particular term aid the feminist movement? What are its benefits and implications? Is it problematic or is it liberating? Do you identify as being a Bad Feminist? Considering the wide range of feminist books, where does Gay’s book belong on this publishing spectrum? And lastly, what does Roxane suggest the feminist movement should do to enable progress?

    • This has gotten me so intrigued! I'm off to read more about Gay, watch her TedTalk, and maybe possibly have this be part of one of my first Artifice posts. I'm hoping maybe I can tie in the "bad feminist" ideas into either a Literature or a Film post. I will be back in touch if I decide to snatch this topic. Thanks for the inspiration. :) – Rachel Watson 5 years ago
      0
    • Hi Rachel, no worries. I love Roxane Gay & her literature. I find her ideas really compelling and have always thought it'd make a good article. Keep me updated on how you go. (Btw, there's some fab articles & interviews in the Guardian online) x – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
      0
    • Hi Aliya, thank you so much for the tip! Do you think that be okay if I combine Gay's ideas with looking at "Jane Eyre"? The literature of Charlotte Bronte is kind of my speciality, so for my first article I was hoping to write something on her. I think it would fit quite well since most readers see Jane Eyre as this pinnacle of feminism and female independence, but then in the end she becomes a wife and mother--but my biggest question (and I think what Gay gets at), is why being more of a tradition woman suddenly means that you're not a feminist, or that you're a "bad" feminist. I would be interested in tying these two together in a Literature post, but I would bring it back to how these issues relate to our contemporary society. – Rachel Watson 5 years ago
      0
    • Wow, that's an amazing angle. I actually had a friend who was really dismissive of Austen, Bronte, etc and I told her that these women were actually remarkable feminist characters at the time, and how that literature transformed society's perspective of women and women's perspectives of themselves. Even by adhering by their traditional roles, they can still be feminists and I feel that's the crux of Gay's novel - how feminism has alarmingly developed into a stereotype and in doing has oppressed various types of women who don't fix the mould. Jane Eyre would be an amazing example - yes she marries Mr Rochester and yes she becomes a mother but she does it all on her own terms. I really really love the idea of this, as you may have gathered. I think it's amazing! – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
      1

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    Aliya Gulamani

    What a fantastic analysis of what appears to be, a great film. I haven’t managed to see it yet but its high on my list. I really enjoyed your article and the references that you made to explain or shed more insight onto certain kinds of behaviours. Definitely has me thinking. Thanks.

    Whiplash: The Cost of Dreams
    Aliya Gulamani

    I really liked this article, and you´re right, it´s so much more than a love film, despite initial impressions. How you weave religious themes, modern movements and psychology together is compelling and persuasive. Really enjoyed this, thank you.

    Chocolat: The Most Over-looked Feminist Film of the 21st Century
    Aliya Gulamani

    This is a fantastic article. I really really enjoyed this and the connections you made between philosophical concepts and the development of Doctor Who are convincing and persuasive. Indeed – we preoccupy ourselves with searching for answers we definitely forget to examine the questions and what they, themselves convey. This has definitely left me musing for a while, thank you.

    Doctor Who? Why the Question is More Important than the Answer
    Aliya Gulamani

    Good article, with an acute analysis of the key themes in the book. I was definitely intrigued by Atticus’s character and how he himself seems to have no class, gender or race prejudice – his sensitivity and awareness is commendable and also in itself breaks gender preconceptions.

    To Kill a Mockingbird: Discrimination Against Race, Gender, and Class
    Aliya Gulamani

    Absolutely fantastic article, a brilliant exploration of such an intriguing concept. Really enjoyed this. Thank you.

    The Philosophical Pitfalls of Utopias in Literature and Film
    Aliya Gulamani

    I’ve unfortunately have not yet been captured by Ginsberg’s poetry, and I hope one day I will be for they seem so important. Your article certainly highlights why and I really enjoyed learning more about the importance of his poetry, the impact they had and that – from the other comments -they’re continuing to have.

    Punk Rock in Allen Ginsberg's Howl: Kill Your Idols to Make Yourself a God
    Aliya Gulamani

    Really interesting article. I’ve always felt that Thelma and Louise is a powerful female empowerment movie, perhaps I’d go further to call it a feminist movie, and your analysis really supports this concept. The detail and attention that you’ve devoted to this article makes it convincing and enlightening. I wonder, though, what you make of J.D and Jimmy and how they fit into the patriarchal world you’ve identified so well?

    Thelma and Louise: The Language of Patriarchy
    Aliya Gulamani

    Loved this article. It’s such an important social issue – particularly in this modern age and not only do you address these concerns but you also provide some valid solutions. The speed at which products are being distributed, circulated and promoted is certainly overwhelming, which is amplified somewhat by the incessant social pressure to be “up-to-date” and “aware.” Often, the initial joy of reading a book or watching something is clouded by this and it’s incredibly tragic to see Art reduced to a commodity. It needs to be talked about and kudos to you, for doing a fantastic job. Thank you.

    The Insatiability of Indulging: Binging in a New Age