Bojan

Bojan

Writer with a PhD in political philosophy. Short stories published in Cosmic Roots & Eldritch Shores, Great Lakes Review, Every Day Fiction, Fiction Vortex, others. Anime

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The Power of Music in Anime

How does a music score affect the overall feel and quality of Anime? Looking at Anime series that place a heavy emphasis on music, such as Nodame Cantabile, Kids on the Slope, and the works of Jun Maeda (who is both an Anime writer and music composer), can we say that a greater emphasis on music contributes to the greater overall quality of the Anime? Does the ability of an Anime series or film to incorporate music make it a superior medium to manga?

  • Some of the best music I've seen in anime is definitely the scores for Miyazaki's films. – enizzari 4 years ago
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Latest Comments

Bojan

I was one of those people who really disliked Shinji (my favorite Anime character is Kamina from Gurren Lagann, the exact opposite of Shinji), but I still enjoyed the show because of all the psychological and philosophical themes and implications.

I also prefer the End of Evangelion movie ending to the series ending. The series ending strips Shinji of all individual agency as he is absorbed into the Human Instrumentality Project along with everyone else. In the film, his agency is restored because he is able to restore his physical body through the force of his will, and he and Asuka become the Adam and Eve of the new world. Hence, the New (Neon) Genesis.

The Endings of Evangelion: Exploring Shinji Ikari
Bojan

It really comes down to catharsis: the capitalist system not only tolerates but actually welcomes films that criticize the excesses of capitalism, because this allows the audience to sympathize with the fictional characters and their struggle, to blow off some emotional steam, and to then move on without seriously questioning the injustices of their own society.

To quote Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s 18th century critique of tragic plays:

“Thus the most advantageous impression of the best tragedies is to reduce all the duties of men to some passing and sterile emotions that have no consequences, to make us applaud our courage in praising that of others, our humanity in pitying the ills that we could have cured, our charity in saying to the poor, God will help you!” (Letter to d’Alembert on the Theater, 26/24)

The Hypocrisy of The Hunger Games
Bojan

I couldn’t agree more! South Park has managed to stay fresh and relevant precisely because of its biting social commentary. I don’t personally agree with some of Matt and Trey’s libertarian positions, but I respect and appreciate their willingness to critique the hypocrisy on all sides of the political spectrum. What sets South Park apart from shows like The Simpsons and Family Guy (I tuned out years ago because both have become stale) is its willingness to challenge the mainstream media dichotomy of “Aging Hippie Liberal Douche” vs. “White Trash Redneck Conservative.”

South Park: Respect Their Commentarah