CoolishMarrow90

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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The Monsters of Love Lost: An Otherworldly Take on Separation in Film

There have been many films that follow a romantic relationship from hopeful beginnings to an optimistic future and there are those that take it to the other end: when a relationship fails and the repercussions that entails. While some take a more realistic approach to the emotions riding through a former couple and their separation, there are others that follow one partner and see the other as almost literal monsters. Examples like David Cronenberg’s The Brood which gives the main character’s wife the ability to create child monsters or Andrzej Żuławski’s Possession having from Mark’s perspective seeing his wife Anna become a crazy sociopath and another woman as almost a double of the former, go into an almost otherworldly plane to explore how painful separation from a loved one can be. There might be other examples of this, like maybe Hideo Nakata’s Dark Water, which is more of a focus on how divorce can effect children in the short term and long term in the realm of a ghost story. So I think the article should be an exploration of films that go into themes of love lost that goes more into the horror aspect and how people can seem to change into monsters when the rose tint is taken away.

  • Hmm, I would also suggest looking into Spike, a 2008 horror adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. – Emily Deibler 3 years ago
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Solid article. I like the structure of it quite a lot.

Reservoir Dogs: The Game and Deception

Interesting. I do agree that the zeitgeist of the time can play a lot into the success and failure of horror films and their overall effectiveness as time passes. The ones that transcend and become classics usually take on those subjects while taking on more universal themes that can be terrifying at times.

I kind of wish foreign horror was brought up more, though. To compare the sensibilities of different cultures and how they view what’s scary for them.

Horror Movies, Why We Love [Some of] Them

It was a rather interesting article to take on. I was only familiar with the original incarnation of Fullmetal Alchemist and have only caught a few episodes of Brotherhood but it was interesting to see the differences in the portrayals of certain homunculi. And I do like the poetic way they are defeated if that was the creator’s intention. Great read and well put together.

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi