LX4Tumbla

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor I

  • Articles
    0
  • Featured
    0
  • Comments
    3
  • Ext. Comments
    3
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    1
  • Topics Taken
    1
  • Notes
    1
  • Topics Proc.
    0
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    37
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    22
    Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

    Latest Topics

    2

    Can an audience still enjoy a film that stars actors who are truly horrible people?

    O.J. Simpson in the Naked Gun movies, Joe Son in Austin Powers, Jeffrey Jones in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. Hollywood films are rife with actors who have found their way on the wrong side of the law. Some are for petty reasons or misdomeanors, though some have been convicted (or at least tried) for truly heinous acts. Though does knowing this take away from the enjoyment of the films themselves? Can an audience enjoy and empathise with a character without seeing the criminal (if not evil) actor beneath? Where do we draw the line in our supposed ‘suspension of disbelief’? Are there some films or actors that people just simply cannot bring themselves to look at? Do we boycott or condemn the film, and is that fair towards the other innocent individuals that worked on it?

    • These are all very interesting questions to ponder, since I have thought about them myself. Maybe choose a specific film and actor to talk about, and try to answer those questions. – Gabby 2 years ago
      2
    • It might be interesting to take a look at this topic from a political/historical perspective, as well as 'homages' to them (i.e. Leni Riefenstahl (propaganda filmmaker during Third Reich) and George Lucas (almost exactly copying one of Riefenstahls frames in Star Wars)). – Charly 2 years ago
      2
    • Depends on the crime, people's individual values/morals, but it's a shame as you say that other innocent actors can feel repercussions, – per221 2 years ago
      1
    • One question you can ask is do we boycott everything about said actor or only stuff that comes out after they became problematic. He’s not an actor but let’s say Kanye West, a lot of people who I know decided to no longer support him because of all his controversy but they still listen to his old music. While as others have decided to completely “unstan” him and anything associated to him from past to present. I think the question of time could be something interesting to target. – tmtonji 2 years ago
      1

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    I feel that the fact that people emotionally invest in characters from video games, helps solidify the fact that video games are an art form/storytelling device on equal footing with literature and movies.

    Emotionally Investing in Games and Their Characters

    I was disappointed with DC when they retconned Barbara Gordon out of her wheelchair with their New 52. Whilst I understand where a lot of the anger from fans came from in regards to the violence she suffered in Moore’s Killing Joke, I felt that her disability made her not just unique, but showed an immense strength in her character. When I started reading Batman in the 90’s, Barbara Gordon was well established as Oracle and was always portrayed as using a wheelchair. She always seemed the smartest in the Bat family, sometimes even being the mastermind in certain storylines. I feel that reading those stories as a child certainly nurtured my respect towards people with disabilities.

    Disability in Comics: The Misconstrued Representation

    Excluding the most recent entry (Survive) and the spinoffs, the Metal Gear series has always strived to pose philosophical questions. Even as far back as the original MSX instalments, Hideo Kojima has been committed to engaging the player and making them think for themselves and expand their conciousness through the medium of video games. I look forward to seeing what he chooses to focus on with the upcoming Death Stranding.

    Video Games That Ask Deep Philosophical Questions