Robyn McComb

Robyn McComb

When I was 7, I wrote a story about a raven named Nalwut. Now I'm 22 and author of 3 novels. I spend my days freelance writing, playing with my dogs, and drinking mimosas.

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    Latest Comments

    Robyn McComb

    So depressing. This novel shows how we can make mistakes doing what we feel is right at the time and then life is forever changed. I liked your stayement about how this novel is a cautionary tale of how life does not go as planned and our dreams may not come true. I still cling to hope that my dreams will, but books like this depress me. I also find it so sad how a flippant remark by Sue ended in so much death and heartbreak. Goes to show that we need to be considerate to our fellow humans, since you never know what could destroy them.

    Jude the Obscure: Infinite Sorrow and Incomplete Desires
    Robyn McComb

    Mad Men wardrobe is definitely attractive! Women knew how to accentuate curves then, and men always seemed to look well put-together and even sexy in suits with cigarettes and gelled hair and glasses of Scotch. Glad lipstick is more popular now, I love lipstick.

    How is 'Vintage' the New Form of Entertainment in Television
    Robyn McComb

    I think that TV is not lacking in historical substance, so much as celebrating a time that people can never live again and thus allowing readers to live in that time vicariously. In order to make the past something worth celebrating and desirable to audiences to want to live vicariously in, however, shows must glamorize the past somewhat. Beautiful vintage clothing and styles is one such way to glamorize the past, making it both real and appealing. Plus, I think people have always loved vintage to a degree, provided that it is so old their moms and their grandmas did not wear/decorate with it. Vintage is a connection to a past. All clothing is made to be attractive (at least, most clothing is…) but its attractiveness dies from generation to generation. However, younger people suddenly can begin to see the attractiveness again in clothes or furniture old enough to no longer be considered “outdated” and instead “vintage.” Then it becomes cool again, and a connection to a past they can never live, or even really understand.

    How is 'Vintage' the New Form of Entertainment in Television
    Robyn McComb

    Great thoughts. I agree that the marketing is indeed only there to get moviegoers to go see the movie, but I also agree that audiences have every right to hold their sense of entitlement to seeing a movie as represented by trailers. Being deceived by a clever marketing ploy leaves people feeling jipped, especially considering how expensive movies are now. People show up feeling like seeing a particular types of film, so if they are shown something different than expected, maybe they are not just unfairly giving up on the film, they are actually rightfully angry.

    Film Marketing: A Lesson in Deception
    Robyn McComb

    That’s my article in a nutshell! Glad you agreed with my interpretation of the film.

    "Her" and Our Love Affair with Technology
    Robyn McComb

    I think a limited Samantha is indeed more likely, but I also agree that Jonze chose to go in a different direction in order to make Samantha leave in the end so that Theodore finds real human warmth.

    "Her" and Our Love Affair with Technology
    Robyn McComb

    I respect your opinion and I do agree that this idea has been done hundreds of times. However, this movie takes the idea and explores the implications of our obsession with technology with it. It kind of adds a fresh spin to the old idea. I also have to disagree with your statement that a person would have to be an emotional cripple to fall in love with a machine. While I can see why you think that, if the machine projects a human identity, and is perfect and readily available in ways no real human can be, then love is inevitable. Or, at least, deep friendship and attachment is inevitable.

    "Her" and Our Love Affair with Technology
    Robyn McComb

    Very true, and it seems to be happening!

    "Her" and Our Love Affair with Technology