ZacSingletary

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor II

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    Latest Articles

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    Original “First World Problems”: Depiction of the Upper Class in The Shoemaker’s Holiday

    Through an analysis of a particular play, Thomas Dekker’s classic The Shoemaker’s Holiday, an attempt is made into describing Renaissance life. The work focuses on the way in which the experience of the upper class in the play differs from the experience of the lower class.

    • I like it. I think this would be a great topic to continue writing on. But do you think that it will be read largely amoungst your peers? – Endea121 3 years ago
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    • This sounds interesting. I would like to see you explore it further. – L Squared 3 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    As a Poe lover I was immediately drawn to your title and area of focus. I thought you did an excellent job breaking down some of the important aspects of the classic short story. From an aesthetic stand point I thought the images were appropriate and kept me engaged. It was a good read.

    Terror and Horror in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"

    I have been a fan of rereading for much of my relatively short life. I never really considered the cons of rereading, and so that perspective was interesting for me to be exposed to. It didn’t change my opinion on rereading, as I felt your other arguments were engaging as well.

    Why Reread Books? The Pros and Cons of Rereading

    In my exposure to him in British Literature, and my own personal paradigms, I too thought of this characterization of Coleridge. The defining of hippie and counterculture made this post relatable in both its description of Coleridge, and relating to modern audiences.

    Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture