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Oversensitivity: Harmful Oppression in Entertainment at the Price of Passion

Examining popular entertainment like film, books, and the arts, can we see where our generational fixation on oversensitivity and prohibiting the lifespan of anything that offends us has weakened or diminshed the reputation/ influence of these mediums? Are we heading toward a destination of absolute safety that leaves no urgency or passion to be acceptable, being too volatile of subjects?

  • Passion in terms of what? Story concepts? Types of scenes or narrative events? The emotional or personal interests of the characters themselves? You're rather vague on that point. – Jonathan Leiter 6 years ago
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  • you subbed this under "film" so I will stick in that art form: what film examples do you have of "oversensitivity"? I am not sure what you mean by this term (and so I agree with Jonathan above). If you provide an example, it will help define what you mean by "oversensitive." – Caitlin Ray 6 years ago
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  • I can't really think of something in recent memory that was cancelled or shut down because it offended too many people. I will agree to some extent that content these days is more "PC friendly," but at the same time, certain things are just as vulgar and inappropriate for certain age groups as they've always been, it just depends on where these things are shown, and what the core demographics are. And also, plenty of shows and books have tried to broaden the scope of modern fiction by exploring topics and approaching stories from an angle which allows a wide variety of people (genders, sexes, colors, cultures, etc) to enjoy it for themselves, and get out of it what is meaningful to them as an individual. Many people will find these new trends offensive and say that they have a sinful agenda, but since when was allowing someone to think for themselves a sin? But, I still have no idea what this all has to do with an eventual ultimate result of total safety in media and a "lack of passion or urgency." I think there are plenty of things to be passionate about that are offensive to no one, but it is the things that are offensive to a lot of people that are worth talking about, because often they are things which shouldn't be offensive at all from a rational point of view, which is why people fight for them to be accepted. I think if people can learn to stop living in the past and embrace a new way of thinking, living, and creating, we might be better off in the future than we are now. We're much better off now than we ever were in previous decades or centuries. But it doesn't feel like it because we all think that our childhood years were so much different than things are right now, when in reality, they probably weren't much different. It all has a lot to do with perspective. – Jonathan Leiter 6 years ago
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  • Are you talking about what media has shown this kind of example in the plot, or are you talking about how our reality effects media? If it's question 1.) I would say the writer should read The Giver. If it's question 2.) I would say research banned books. – Jaye Freeland 6 years ago
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  • The Giver by Lois Lowry or The Chrysalids by John Wyndham are two books that are relevant to this topic. Munjeera – Munjeera 6 years ago
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