Derek

Derek

I am an aspiring writer and educator with an interest in resiliency education through philosophy, Queer rights, feminism, and decolonization.

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    Graphic Novels vs. Comic Books

    I’m fairly new to the world of comic books, and I’m really curious in the effect of distinguishing between graphic novels and comics. I have heard the suggestion that graphic novel is a gentrifying term that prioritizes one type of expression over another. Art Spiegelman, for one, dislikes the term graphic novel.

    I’m wondering what people more knowledgeable than I am on this topic think about this suggestion.

    • Normally "graphic novels" nowadays are a series of comic books all in one that come out after the first part of a series has finished. So, Deadpool 1-9 would all be together in one huge comic book (hints, also, why they are 30-40$). Rather than buying the separate issues 1-9 for 3$ or so. I don't know if that is a millennial thing that changed it and made it like this. But, I mostly would buy it for that reason. A graphic novel could also be a longer version of a comic book as well, more novel formation rather also. But, I'm not sure what other people think about the topic.I know that comic books more so have issues that come out weekly or monthly. But the art style I assume is also different and etc., which can be explored upon as well. – scole 4 years ago
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    • I think graphic novel as a term also refers to the length as well as the binding of the book itself. Comic books have a kind of lighter and more fragile binding, and are more cheaply made which is how the cost can be as low as it is to sell them. Graphic novels are longer and are usually bound with a paperback or hard back cover in some cases.I think the Westernization of graphic novels is in some part of the influence of manga translations over to the Western world. Just my opinion though. – Nayr1230 4 years ago
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    • A graphic novel may well have a beginning, middle, and end, just as most novels do. It is likely to have narrative completion. Comic books are more likely to have an open ended narrative when you take them as a whole. That is, they do not necessarily constitute a completed whole. It's not just a matter of which is longer (graphic novel versus a comic book or a series of comic books) or that X number of comic books might go together to make a novel. A series of comic books (about a given superhero, for example) could conceivably go on forever. The series may well end not because the hero's story is "finished," but because the artist died, the publisher dropped the series, or the public tired of that hero. – JWHorton 4 years ago
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    • The way I understand it graphic novels are comic narratives that reveal everything from the characters to the message of the story, while comic books use episodic segments to get their point across. – RadosianStar 4 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Derek

    Fantastic article! I have to admit that my knowledge of Queer Lit. is embarrassingly sparse (recommendations are welcome!), but this puts into words something that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately.

    With reference to the recent Queerphobic attacks in the US, I think that this rally-cry for Queer characters being depicted as humans rather than plot devices is so important. Thank you for the piece!

    Queer Death in Media: Drawing Attention to the Bloodshed
    Derek

    I loved this article: I’m particularly interested in the connection between the mother’s body and the home as subverting gendered spaces.

    I’m wondering what you think of the idea that these subversions can be empowering to women? Just in virtue of depicting a women (even if it’s through horror) as dealing with feelings of resentment toward their children? I mean, this is coming from a cis-male perspective, so maybe the question is ridiculous.

    Maternal Horror Films: Understanding the 'Dysfunctional' Mother
    Derek

    This is a great point that I often thought about while studying Freud. It’s tough because, yes, Freudian theories are deeply problematic, but they are also a system in which culture has been created within for so long. I think that there is a bit of a self-fulfilling system regarding Freud, and arts and culture tend to keep the system going.

    Maternal Horror Films: Understanding the 'Dysfunctional' Mother
    Derek

    Great article, Emily! I’m wondering how you think that this trend in horror (toward more psychological horror) plays out as an evolution of a genre. You touch on it briefly, but, for example, why do we see this type of horror movie in the 60s and 70s, and what does the prominence of slasher-films in the 80s and 90s do to subvert the psychological aspects?

    This is a pretty nebulous question, though.

    Fantastic article on a fantastic film; a film that I have been an incessant nag about everyone I come into contact with seeing.

    The Witch: Yes, It is a "True" Horror Film