DrownSoda

DrownSoda

Let's talk. Special interests in Philosophy, Sexuality, Politics, Film, Literature, and History.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Amadeus and the Mark of Cain

    Juxtapose the Biblical story of Cain and Abel with Milos Forman’s film Amadeus. Posit that the relationship between Salieri and Mozart mirrors the relationship between Cain and Abel.

    Salieri perceives that God has betrayed his faith by granting more talent to Mozart, similar to the ways in which Cain feels that God has given Abel the upper hand. While Mozart’s cause of death was not murder, Salieri repeatedly expresses a desire to kill him. Salieri also spends so much time manipulating Mozart, while Mozart spends most of his time composing; similar to the work ethic of Cain and Abel.

    At the end of the film, Salieri attempts to play God by "absolving" himself and his fellow psych ward inmates, much like Cain tries to play God by taking away a life.

    • Sorry I didn't mean to mark that as fixed, I just wanted to thank you for the note. I thought I was so witty and original for thinking of this! In all honesty, I'd much rather explore a different topic based on this recent discovery. But I'm glad you told me about this research. I'm reading the article now! – DrownSoda 2 months ago
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    • Unfortunately, I haven't seen Amadeus, but this makes me want to check it out. :) – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
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    • Genius! You have a talent for seeing connections. – Munjeera 2 months ago
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    American Psycho: Political Rhetoric

    I started reading American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis during the final debate, and finished the novel shortly after the election. At the start of the novel, there is a particular quote that, I think, mimes the political rhetoric used during election season (well used frequently, but only recognized by a wider audience during election season). While watching a Milo Yiannopoulos talk (shameful–I know), a member of the audience referenced the same quote; which he refers to as the speech given during "the restaurant scene" in the film. The audience member argued that the monologue, performed by anti-hero, Patrick Bateman, mimics some of the language Clinton used during the campaign. I found it very interesting, especially since Bateman is obviously obsessed with Trump throughout the entire novel. While the novel was published in 1991, and the Clinton’s weren’t yet a household name, I found it very funny that both the audience member and I made that association (despite the fact that I found Bateman’s speech to be a satirical monologue that could be applied to Clinton, Trump, and media’s impression on the common person’s understanding of politics). I want to share this quote, let me know what you think:

    "We have to stop people from abusing the welfare system. We have to provide food and shelter for the homeless and oppose racial discrimination and promote civil rights while also promoting equal rights for women but change the abortion laws to protect the right to life yet still somehow maintain womenโ€™s freedom of choice. We also have to control the influx of illegal immigrants. We have to encourage a return to traditional moral values and curb graphic sex and violence on TV, in movies, in popular music, everywhere. Most importantly we have to promote general social concern and less materialism in young people."

    Ellis, Bret Easton, author. American Psycho : a Novel. New York :Vintage Books, a division of Random House, Inc., 1991. p.15. Print.

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      Latest Comments

      DrownSoda

      I absolutely agree. Having struggled with an eating disorder in the past, as well as knowing several female friends with anorexia, I know how the Hollywood image of sexiness impacts one’s perception of their own body. Research does confirm this as well.

      That being said, and I’m very sorry if this sounds crass, I find it nice to look up to sexy Hollywood stars. Camille Paglia, my personal muse as a writer, regards Classic Hollywood stars as pagan idols. She suggests they should be revered; not necessarily emulated.

      It would be nice to see a balance where we can admire the beauty of celebrities and other glamour idols, without trying to mimic their oft-unhealthy habits. Can this ever be achieved? I do wonder that often…

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      I’ll have to look into this fascinating study. Thank you for the suggestion.

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      Thank you Munjeera! As a writer, I only scold when necessary. My objective here aligns with the integrity of The Artifice: to enlighten and entertain.

      The first half of the article was lengthy because I wanted to focus on the war of toys. My goal was to discuss both the war on toys and the art of toys, and I hope I expressed a balance of ideas.

      I think it’s important that people understand that many people subvert gender norms and many other don’t. I feel that recent coverage over gender stereotyping often implies that gender norms are oppressive. In fact, they are in many cases. But other times they are simply norms that a general population inhabit. Let’s celebrate those who naturally follow this script as well as those who subvert it.

      Also, I am fascinated by the concept of toy preference among transgender and intersex children. But, as Munjeera confirms, this is a topic for another article. There is so much that can be examined here, and the research in that area seems scant (based on my recent investigations). If anyone has articles they like to share on this topic, I’d love to hear it!

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      I love Christina Hoff Sommers! In fact, I recently applied to be her research assistant over the summer. Thanks for sharing!

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      Thank you! Although I’m discussing the “norm” with toy preference, I was a boy who played with Sky Dancers frequently. Does anyone remember those? They were the coolest toys, but they may have been considered hazardous and consequentially recalled ๐Ÿ™

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      Thank you LC. Honestly, I felt that the info on toys and gender correspondence was repetitive, but I expanded on these issues based upon recommendations. It just goes to show: sometimes you’re your own best critic. I’m sorry you felt scolded, but I like to taunt my readers a bit ๐Ÿ˜‰ There’s so much to say on this topic, and I fully encourage people to upstage this article!!

      Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
      DrownSoda

      Riccio–amazing article! I do share Blephen75’s critique of the statement: “Thus, for Nietzsche, these scientific revelations proved his belief in life as meaningless.” As you explain that these truth systems are human creations to validate human existence, in reference to religion (and more specifically Christianity), I think it would also help to delve into the distinction between scientific fact and the invention of human logic. Perhaps rephrasing this statement into something like: “Thus, for Nietzsche, these scientific inquiries corroborated his analysis of the futility of human existence.” And then from there perhaps discuss the paradox of scientific revelations as it pertains to human truths and the human invention of logic. I love the concept of fate and free will that you focus on towards the end of the article. Your conclusion was very cohesive and compelling. As a fellow Nietzsche enthusiast, I’m particularly found of his seminal work “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” and the quote “shatter the tablets” (in reference to Moses, and of course translated differently among several scholars). I think that quote is especially relevant to this article.

      The Death of a Purposeful Man
      DrownSoda

      I’ll admit, this is the first article I’ve read about the Nintendo Switch (though I did watch the trailer recently). I think the voice chat feature could definitely be a make or break situation for the upcoming system. I, for one, am very much looking forward to its ability to be used as a handheld console. Perhaps I am an outlier, but I much prefer the physicality of a handheld device (as an avid user of the DS) over touch screen games. Regardless, I can’t wait to test all the features on the Switch!

      The Nintendo Switch: What It Needs To Succeed