WebJJohnston

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Dante's Inferno: Self Insert Fanfiction, or Classic Literature?

    Analyzing the concepts of the popular site, Fanfiction, and use of self inserts while examining one of the most prolific of 14th century poetry by Dante’s Divine Comedy, from Inferno to Paradiso. This essay will also examine the use of self inserts in modern literature, such as Slaughterhouse Five, and other novels that use this concept as a way to commentate on the events that occur in the story.

    • It seems to me that the topic you are referring to will make for an interesting experience if handled well. There had been a movie which used the whole concept of Dante's "Divine Comedy" (mostly Inferno) although the only ones (fan fiction) which I've come across are on deviantART rather than on fanfiction.net http://kiwikiwi3.deviantart.com/gallery/33711392/Seventh-Circle http://nazaru.deviantart.com/art/9-Circles-of-the-Shadow-Realm-152335095 http://www.deviantart.com/browse/all/literature/fanfiction/d65ityw With that said, seems like an interesting topic to work on, and I look forward to any results which pop up in fanfiction.net (good and bad) on such a concept – shehrozeameen 5 years ago
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    • Very interesting topic. Obviously the practice has changed from respected to less respected, and there's a lot of history to deal with. I'd also recommend looking at Thomas More's Utopia for this, as he uses a self-insert to argue against the controversial "Utopia" the main character describes for the majority of the work. – IndiLeigh 5 years ago
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    • I would also recommend exploring Paradise Lost by John Milton, the ultimate biblical epic aka fanfiction. He doesn't self-insert himself as a character per se, but he is ostensibly the third-person omniscient narrator and his voice does come across through a variety of figures. – txl 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Cosplay is definitely an art form, no joke. Even if it was hastily put together, which rarely is the case, people still recognize the characters they’re portraying and it still is fun.

    An Overview of Cosplay: Exploring the Subculture

    I have to agree, Cowboy Bebop is one of the legends in animation that definitely deserves its title. While it may “look” dated, with the 3d animation looking not up to par with what we have now, the story stays strong; a lone space cowboy and his posse trying to survive in the space age time of crime and politics. It really is something to behold.

    See you later, Space Cowboy.

    Cowboy Bebop: Top Ten Essential Episodes

    Alan Moore has done a fantastic job with The Killing Joke, although personally it’s one of the most darkest points in Batman’s time as a super hero. It’s not because of the suddenly changed role of Barbara Gordon; the then Batgirl now revived in the New Batgirl series by Cameron Stewart and Babs Tarr, but of the philosophy that Joker puts onto Batman. We all know, if you have read the shenanigans of Joker and Batman long enough, that they are two sides of the same coin; the brooding dark knight with his clown jester trying to crack a joke out of him. But here, we see the “origin story” (I’m putting this lightly because there’s the Moore story, and then there’s Batman: Arkham Origins, which, I’m going to say was not the best story in the Arkham series.) and how he had the one “bad day” that changed his life forever. Philosophies and humanity are exposed as the two duke it out, until the bittersweet ending of Joker finally being locked up in Arkham, even though that it never was penciled in.

    Moral Truths Within 'The Killing Joke': Tragedy and Choice