claytonpitcher

claytonpitcher

English undergrad at Buffalo State. An aspiring poet and funny-man. I like exploring word-play, the subtleties of language, and the question "who am I?"

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Latest Topics

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Comedy and Film Noir

What are certain comedies that draw on themes of film noir and neo-noir that make these comedies ironic? The example of Arrested Development comes to mind. Culturally, film noir played a major role during and after the second World War, and now with the advent of the comedies of today, is there a levity in darkness? What cultural circumstances must be evident to bring about the bleak and the comedic?

  • Another comedy that comes to mind is Who Framed Roger Rabbit. It's got a bunch of different elements in it that you could talk about. – nighteyes 5 years ago
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Latest Comments

claytonpitcher

I don’t find the example of Sherlock Holmes fitting. He’s not a particularly heroic character outside of his brilliance. Even though it was a “fan service” to contrive a way to have Holmes’ intelligence save him, there’s satisfaction in the success of wit. The details of characterization, in this case, matter.

Sherlock Holmes: To "Kill Off", or Not to "Kill Off"
claytonpitcher

It speaks to the adroitness of the director and the actors reoccurring in the director’s films when they are able to play roles – when compared, juxtaposed, whichever – that are able to be distinct from one another such that the actors aren’t “type-casted.” It’s incredible to see. It’s why it’s so easy to pick out a Tarantino movie once it’s described.

The Work of Quentin Tarantino: Quality Over Quantity
claytonpitcher

There’s a great episode entitled Deep Breath with the twelfth Doctor that exemplifies the Ship of Theseus thought experiment that I think you referred to. The Doctor is the embodiment of the question “who am I?” With the emphasis on the question “Doctor who?” in the revival of 2005, people are able to identify more with this mythic sage. He’s thousands of years old, and still has no idea who he is. He reminds me of Alice in Lewis Carroll’s eminent books; Alice can’t give an accurate account of who she is because she has changed so often. With the Doctor’s many faces, he is a reflection of all of us at once.

Doctor Who? Why the Question is More Important than the Answer
claytonpitcher

As an aspiring writer with a penchant for being rigorously correct while straying from cliches, this is a great list that I can refer back to later. In fact, I’m almost certain that the Lynne Truss book here is required for a course of mine coming up. Thanks!

Essential Books for Writers