joshuahall

joshuahall

A Digital Media student fond of writing.

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    What does Netflix's model of season release mean for television series?

    Netflix stands by its method of releasing an entire season of a show at once; House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt are all successful shows that have used this method. How will this change the television series model? Will cable television shows lag behind due to the extra space between each episode’s release? Without the concept of screen time on a network, will we see more series produced exclusively for the web, where we have unlimited space and time for television shows? How will this change the structure of each show? Will dramas continue to end each episode with suspense to ensure the viewer’s return, or save the big twists for the end of the season? And, as an afterthought, will cable shows garner more fans when they are released online for streaming, versus their original premiere on a network?

    • Netflix is taking advantage of its model and that's that people watch Netflix to binge. If they were to release an ep once a week, it might disinterest viewers and look for another completed show to watch (one that has multiple seasons). Broadcasters release an episode per week to get viewers to come back, and leave cliffhangers to tease them. It's simply understanding your structure and using it to your advantage. – YsabelGo 5 years ago
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    • Live television will always have its place, for the background noise or the effect of experiencing something with thousands of people at one. However, I do believe the quality will go down. We'll see less drama that relies on you watching every week and more comedy. People come to live television to watch for a bit and then walk away. Why watch a drama on television in the coming years when you can watch the whole story from beginning to end by losing a day? Netflix will change television styles to a mixture of suspense at each episode's end and saving the big twists. They've proved that both are excellent models for television. It just depends on what kind of show you're presenting. – casswaslike 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    joshuahall

    I played Serena before I knew any of its backstory. I’m glad you gave a concise history. It really contextualizes the game, and makes it even more impressive.

    Like you said, the voice acting is a bit hokey, but the narrative is phenomenal. It really succeeds as a digital narrative, allowing the player to explore at their own pace without losing the quality of its storytelling. If this is the result of indie game-making collaboration, then I’m excited to see what else the industry has to offer. Removing Serena from the profit-driven industry and creating it for an artistic and striking purpose truly allowed the game to flourish. It shows how much of an impact a video game can make; games like this are defining the future of the indie industry.

    Serena and the Power of Collaborative Indie Game Development
    joshuahall

    You captured two dark storytellers very well. I’m not as versed in Neil Gaiman as I’d like to be, but I read a lot of Stephen King growing up, and I have to agree that his narratives are pioneering horror and magical realism in the postmodern.

    What always struck me about King was the way he often made inter-human conflict the driving force. In Under the Dome, the trapped citizens face more conflict from the power-struggle than the dome itself. Often, King’s magical element is only a catalyst for human conflict. Pet Sematary and Needful Things are good examples of this. In Carrie, the human conflict creates the magical element, which is then fueled by further human conflict. The villains aren’t necessarily the magical elements, but the humans who use them.

    My point is: King’s magical realism seems to be lens for looking into society. He can explain our conflict-driven world through his magical world. When reading his characters, we see ourselves. We are not heroes, or knights, or wizards, but we are writers, and cops, and doctors, and parents, and sometimes the world feels utterly against us. It’s why I love Stephen King horror. The enemy is not someone with an evil nature–it’s us.

    Neil Gaiman and Stephen King: The Power of Realism in Postmodern Fantasy
    joshuahall

    I like the way you framed the critic as part of the creation of a film, even though most people assume that the critic’s role comes after the film is made. Movies are often discussed in terms of their director/leads, and the many hands who assisted in a film are usually forgotten.

    Most often I view critics as contextualization; at least, that’s often how I use them. Their discussion is beyond emotional reaction and delves into artistic significance. Beyond a basic reaction, they discuss how the films fits into the larger trend of its genre, and whether the film succeeded in whatever it was trying do.

    Critics are like quality-checks, ensuring that what’s made was made with purpose and vision. I enjoy your praise for the film critic, but I do have to disagree with your distaste for Sharknado. They can make those films until I die.

    The Glaring Importance of Critics in Filmmaking