KKillian

KKillian

Bachelor of English, Michigan State University College of Arts & Letters, Class of 2016.

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Latest Topics

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The Nostalgia Trend: Good or Bad for Future Generations?

It seems like every new release these days is either a reboot, a revival, or a sequel. That’s all well and good for those of us who grew up with the original media and are now more than happy to see it return, but is this trend perpetrating the longevity of the series we love, or is it robbing the next generation of too many chances to form their own unique experiences with new media?

  • I think the question is less about the level of goodness for younger (what I assume you mean by "future") generations, and more about how the generation appreciating the original interacts with the new nostalgia. Media is like a time capsule. Social climate, humor trends, and so much more changes over time, so when we reboot media, how do people balance nostalgia/tradition with change and the present?I don't think that younger generations will care as much. Especially if they are unfamiliar with the older versions. – ASeriousLady 4 years ago
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  • I love this question. I was just talking about the book The Future of Nostalgia by Svetlana Boym, and I think she's on to something regarding cultural landmarks and landscapes that might be applicable to your developing analysis. Of course, I'm also thinking of the cable show Stranger Things, which was full of 80s references, but didn't advance the plot or make the characters more finely drawn. As a child of the 80s, I thought the references were a nostalgia "straw man" that distracted from problems and gaps in the narrative. – pfurnish 4 years ago
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  • We need new media. I want to see what Millennials and their successors can come up with on their own, because we really are the generation of reboots and superheroes. No more "Stranger Things" style homages. At the very least, go the "Rick and Morty" route and bastardize a respected property until you imbue it with a new thematic significance, elevating the work to new levels of art. Anyway, yeah, someone needs to write this topic, if only to speculate what a landscape with more unique properties would even look like coming from our specific concerns and fixations. – demogorgonzola 4 years ago
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  • I've always believed old and new things have their place, but that we've lost out on enjoying some older things because pre-nostalgia, our generation was exposed to so many new and trendy things. Example: Sometimes my parents or grandmother (my only living grandparent) will talk to me about the things they watched or read or experienced, and while I can appreciate they loved these things, I can't actually relate. I'd like to see more of a mix of nostalgia and new media, especially since each generation has its own experiences to feel nostalgic about. I mean, one of these days our kids and grandkids are going to be nostalgic about iPhones, Netflix, and online pizza orders. Scary. :) – Stephanie M. 3 years ago
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Latest Comments

KKillian

Cable providers have certainly deserved to become obsolete for a long time now. Inevitably every package contains a multitude of channels you’d sooner go blind than watch, and they bait you with services only to “coincidentally” move them to a more expensive package later, “whoops.” I wouldn’t be opposed in the least if streaming TV took over entirely within the next 10-20 years.

Online VS On TV: Is Cable Becoming Obsolete?
KKillian

I grew up with the prequels, so I’ve always been in the minority that always genuinely enjoyed them. As I got older, seeing the barrage of hatred for them was more than a little disquieting. People seem to attack these movies as a free-for-all without remembering that they’re only movies. They’re only supposed to provide a few hours of entertainment, that’s it. It’s possible the prequels were a victim of Lucas pulling a JK Rowling, continuing to pile on information that nobody asked for, but it’s even more likely, I think, that they’re just a victim of narrow, fanboy minds and overly heightened expectation. Were they priceless pieces of cinematic art? No. But they served their purpose, they provided us with backstory, and they represented huge strides in the CGI industry, too. For whatever they are, they’re not worthless.

In Defense of the Star Wars Prequels
KKillian

I think the romanticization of writers is something that most, if not all writers end up doing at some point or other, whether in a work of their own or in their own heads. It goes along with the way people as a species are inherently narcissistic. We all want to think of ourselves as the narrator; as the person in charge of taking the everyday or the tragic and presenting it to the rest of the world in a way that will qualify as beautiful or special, something worth outlasting us.

From The Get Down to Moulin Rouge: A Look at Baz Luhrmann's Writer-Heroes