msnfrd

msnfrd

Far too into popular culture, especially SF and zombies, for my own good. Teach history and sociology of sport as my real job (yes, that's a thing).

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    World Expanding with the Walking Dead Novels

    Both The Walking Dead television show and the comic book series are incredibly popular, sharing similarities but so different in story and character arc that they constitute separate universes. Less well known (relatively) is the series of novels, written initially by Robert Kirkman with Jay Bonansinga, and later taken over by Bonansinga as the sole writer. These novels, set in the comic universe, explore the rise of the Governor in more depth, and then follow events in Woodbury after he is gone. What ways do the novels expand the world of the comics, in terms of character and plot development, and how does the post-governor Woodbury relate to other types of societies seen in the series?

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      Latest Comments

      msnfrd

      I appreciated the way you deconstructed different aspects of editing, production, etc. For competitive reality TV, one of the key things seems to be the choice of people in the first place. Watching shows like Big Brother and Survivor, I’ve often been struck by how much people are living, walking stereotypes. In some measure, it’s match the types of “characters” you want and let the conflict happen. to be heightened then by the many things you’ve discussed.

      The Enhanced Reality of Reality TV
      msnfrd

      Have to agree with the couple of people who suggest that the term “speculative fiction” is older than you’re initially suggesting. But I do really like the way that you break down sub-genres and the major topics within them. Suggestion for future consideration if writing about SF history or genres – think about “space opera” as a major sub-genre. Lots of what you have in the other sub-genres here would fit well with that, too, and it was a big influence in the 1930s and 40s.

      Science-Fiction: Defining a Sprawling Genre.
      msnfrd

      Enjoyed the article. Sometimes the historical inaccuracies can be a jumping off point for people to do more investigation themselves, so maybe there’s value in that. I teach a world history of sport course, and use lots of films to communicate a sense of things, but relate the inaccuracies to current perspectives and misunderstandings. For example, I love to pick apart “A Knight’s Tale” but try to point out how the intentionally modern things in it are meant to communicate to the audience how much this was “sport” to people at the time.

      How Important is Historical Accuracy in Films?