Joslyn Robinson

Joslyn Robinson

Joslyn Robinson, MFAW. Writer/college instructor. Focus: genre fiction, transpersonal psychology, myths and fairytales. Visit at joslynrobinson.com

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

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Web-Videos
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Web Videos: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Anyone can publish a video on the web. There are series that have gone one for years, the Junior and Chef Pee Pee videos, the Game Grumps. An article that compares and contrasts the good, bad and ugly of "home-made" web-video series would be fascinating. What’s popular, what’s good, what’s awful and why? And why are they so popular?

  • It would have to be well established as to what makes a "good" or "bad" video. Is it production, content, etc? – Ryan Errington 5 years ago
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Story or Trophies: A Gamer's Dilema

With all video games hooked into the internet and social media, what is more enjoyable: the story of the game and the personal experience of the gamer, or the pressure to achieve trophies and on-line notoriety. How is this trend impacting games and gamers?

  • For Story is for non-competitive gamers, while Trophies are for competitive gamers, I feel – Aaron Hatch 6 years ago
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  • To whoever picks this one up: the two don't have to be in opposition. Both are parts of a gaming experience that are designed to keep you playing the game. The feeling of annihilating an immortal being in God of War and getting a coveted badge in Call of Duty both make you feel -- for the lack of a better word -- like a badass. Or take a look at some other story driven games. In Portal 2, there's are achievements for completing alternate tasks that lead to a new "ending". It's a trophy given for your actions in completing the story. The two should always be viewed synchronously. – Austin 5 years ago
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Modern Art for the Common Person

Is art dead? Has art become an expression of personal narcissism? Or does it still feed the human soul? What delineates good art and bad art in Modern Art? Who decides? An exploration and examples of Modern Art and Artists and which, if any, have any value would be interesting and informative.

  • I appreciate your topic about modern art. However, the tone of these leading questions seems to be negative. Perhaps another approach would be how are people being exposed to modern art through media or actually going to galleries and museums? Most art forms, including modern art, as you know, are subjective and people develop their own individual perception as to which artists speak to their soul. – Venus Echos 5 years ago
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The Evolution of the Zombie Film

A comprehensive overview of this genre would be insightful and helpful for readers interested in the genre. Questions to ponder: what was the first Zombie film? Why do Zombies continue to fascinate us and what deeper meaning does it have for us as audience and society? Where can it go next?

  • This would be a very interesting article. You could even write about the two different zombies depicted in pop culture: the slow moving and the fast running ones. Just an idea! – Amanda Dominguez-Chio 6 years ago
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  • There's been a lot of work done analyzing the zombie movie as a comparison to consumerism. Romero's _Dawn of the Dead_ was set in a shopping mall to emphasis this theme. Any discussion of how/why the zombie metaphor's in use would have to discuss the evolution from that point, or at least acknowledge it. – Monique 6 years ago
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  • This type of article is on my 'to do' list. However, regarding the where can it go next question is an exploration of subcultures that invest in the zombie lore and have celebrated and much attended Zombie Walks. These participants might be able to answer that question. – Venus Echos 5 years ago
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Latest Comments

Joslyn Robinson

Hi ND,
Does literature need conflict or is it that the reader needs conflict and therefore literary conflict is a “device” of invention and not necessary. That seemed to be a main question early on and a fascinating one. But I was unclear at the end of the article if you answered that. I think you illustrated the need for conflict as part of the human condition, but I am not sure you proved this is why conflict exists ( and is necessary ) for story based literature, if that was your argument. You proved that conflict is inherent to the human existence but therefore wouldn’t it then be inherent in all story based literature about a human being? Have you read Aristotle’s Poetics?

The Philosophy of Conflict in Literature
Joslyn Robinson

Thank you for the well thought out (and thought provoking) comment.
I have also given much thought to the concept of Jung’s anima/animus in regards to gender identity and sexuality. Absolutely fascinating and it makes a whole hell of a lot of sense as well as a possible avenue for understanding the diverse and complex nature of human sexuality and gender orientation.

Thanks again.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

That is a great writing exercise. It makes a character’s “flaw” very real and individual to the character, and not a stereotypical tack-on.

Thanks for the idea!

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

Yes, I was also deeply influenced be King’s writing, specifically his early work. He has a way (as he puts it) of getting “skin on skin” intimate with his characters that brings us into uncomfortable (and unforgettable) intimacy with them.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

I think that, as writers, it is easy (or easily glossed over) to forget that no matter how great the idea, concept, setting or plot we have for a a story, it is ultimately character that matters most. Without a “real” character, there can be no “real” story. And like “real” people, characters also have a psychology: good and bad, light and dark.

Thanks for reading and the comment.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

Sounds like you need to stop thinking, get your character out of your head and onto the page! Put the critic in a box and the box on the shelf and let the character and story out of the closet.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

It is a scary and thrilling place to be when a character truly becomes a living breathing thing. This is when you have to let go and let them guide the story, and you just take dictation, and all your well laid plot plans go into the trash.
Thank you for the thoughtful comment.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide
Joslyn Robinson

Yes, the Shadow is by far one of the most complex concepts. And your observation about opposites is astute. The rational (conscious) mind likes to think of things, organize things, in terms of “opposites” Good and bad, light and dark, etc. But in the unconscious mind, there is no opposite, so that’s where the conflict arises.
Great observation,
Thanks.

Working with The Shadow: A Writer's Guide