sarah jae

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    How Men vs Women Write Feminist Novels

    When reading a feminist novel, or one based on that movement, if differentiates greatly between the gender of the author. Women, I find, speak more passionately about the subject, and are willing to stand up and ridicule the opposite sex with great meaning and intention. However, when a man is writing a book about feminism, it’s through an entirely new set of eyes. He may or may not judge the patriarchy as harshly or express similar views, even though it’s the same concept.

    • This is an interesting topic. It would be cool to see comparisons between books written by the opposite sex. – OkaNaimo0819 6 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    I think it’s wonderful that fans of different tv shows can from time to time have an opportunity to be heard by the producers. Not only through ratings, but voicing concerns and showing support for different shows can really make a difference, and it’s cool when it happens.

    Fan-Power: Saving Shows From Cancellation

    I whole-heartedly agree. It’s interesting to look back and watch the evolution of storytelling!

    The Emergence of New Media Writing

    Good points made. I think that as a reader it’s inherent that there will never be a completely accurate novel-movie adaptation. However, I find that it becomes less engaging when it’s more apparent. If the movie producers take out a major plot point or change something along the way, it surprises everyone, especially those who are coming in having read the novel first. For example in Shadowhunters, they had killed off characters that were never meant to die or had no reason to, sloppily making it a part of the plot for one mere episode. It felt like they were going for shock value, and they succeeded: Nobody saw it coming. It did, however, close many doors for future plot foundations. If the character was unimportant, it doesn’t matter. But if it changes major narrative features, that’s where people find problems.

    An Analysis into Screen Adaptations